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Old Jun 8, 2006, 11:42 PM   #11
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hey Terry,:|Thank yu for remind me that !

by the way I am now looking for a replacement of my tripod....anyone can advise me ..........??

my budget around US$150 or slightly more
- tobe use for D200+lenses which the longest below 300mm zoom =
total weight camera + lens less than 2,5Kg
prefer a ball head that have only 1 or 2 knob for tighten

thank you
shakyhands
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Old Jun 9, 2006, 6:03 AM   #12
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[email protected] wrote:
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Shakyh ands,Some Nikons let you shoot with a flash at 1/500th.�That could work for indoor situations I suppose.-- Terry�

If you're using flash, you really don't need fast shutter speeds in darker conditions.

It depends on how much light you have.

I've got a little Konica KD-510z that I take with me everywherein my pants pocket,and Iprefer to shoot most of my flash photos with a shutter speedof 1/30 second, even though this model gives me a choice of what shutter speed the camera will usewith flash and autoexposure (1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125). Or, if you switch to manual exposure, you can set shutter speeds any way you want to with flash (up to 1/2000 second). It defaults to 1/60 with flash from the factory using Autoexposure.

This way (shooting at slower shutter speeds), you pick up a little more ambient light.

The only time I get in trouble trying to shoot at 1/30 second or slower is when there is alot of light coming in through windows during the daytime. Then, you can get some ambient light exposure of your subject, resulting in motion blur.

Heck, Isometimes use 1/15 second with flash in darker surroundings (for example, restaurants and clubs at night), with no perceptable motion blur from either camera shake or subject movement at lower ISO speeds.

The flash itself freezes the action. Most strobes have a flash burst length of between 1/1000 and 1/10000 second, depending on range to subject. At lower ISO speeds indoors with most lenses, your subject won't be exposed by ambient light at typical shutter speeds most cameras use by default (around 1/60 second is common with flash turned on).

As a result, the subject is only exposed properly during the very short flash burst (the image would be dark without the flash). So, the flash itself has the impact of freezing the action, since it's typically a 1/1000 second or shorter burst length.

Where you run into difficulty is when you have too much ambient light contributing (ISO speeds set higher, too much light coming in through windows, aperture opened all the way with a brighter lens, etc.). So, it's all a balance (depending on conditions).

Here's an example of how flash can freeze action at slower shutter speeds in darker surroundings. Shot with a Konica Revio KD-510z at 1/15 second, ISO 200, f/2.8 with flash (and BTW, there was a lit chandelier over the dance floor, but it did not provide enough ambient light to cause any motion blur with these camera settings:


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Old Jun 9, 2006, 6:42 AM   #13
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Well JimC, your tips very interesting , this idea never occured in my mind before, but yes I can imagine it will work perfectly if the situation consider as "dark" and the movement object is quiet near to the camera

Thank you JimC for the input...............
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Old Jun 9, 2006, 6:55 AM   #14
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A typical "well lit" home interior at night has an EV (Exposure Value, which is one way light is measured) of between 5 and 6.

Let's give it the benefit of the doubt and call it EV 6.

At f/2.8 (largest available aperture on most non-DSLR compact cameras), and ISO 100, you'd need a shutter speed of 1/8 second to expose the imageinEV 6 light levelswithout a flash.

So, using 1/60 second at f/2.8 and ISO 100, ambient light exposure would be 3 full stops under where you'd normallyset shutter speed without a flash (very dark image). As a result, the flash itself freezes the action, since the subjects are only exposed properly during the flash burst.

Some compact models have ISO 50 available now, too. So, that would put ambient light exposurea full 4 stops under in typical well lit interiors at night shooting at ISO 50, f/2.8 and 1/60 second.

Or, you could use a smaller aperture (higher f/stop number) to accomplish the same thing.

That's probably why most manufacturers use a shutter speed of around 1/60 second with flash turned on using Autoexposure. It's a good "compromise" setting that lets you capture moving subjects indoors without motion blur in most conditions you'd need a flash, since the flash itself freezes the action due to a very short flash burst length.

On the downside, flash range will be shorter if you use lower ISO speed settings or smaller aperture (each time you double the ISO speed, max flash range increases by 1.4x). So, it's all a matter of balance, depending on conditions, camera specs, etc.



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Old Jun 9, 2006, 7:03 AM   #15
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jimc, do i need to compensate the flash by 1/3 - 1stop to minimise the effect of the image so its not really looks like we shot with flash? or let the flash "power" on its std setting power from the camera?pls advis
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Old Jun 9, 2006, 7:12 AM   #16
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That'sanother downside of letting the flash provide all of the light. You can tell the photo was taken with a flash, unless you use an external flash (bouncing it and/or using a decent diffuser.

So, there are pros and cons to using flash to freeze action.

You wouldn't want to try and dial it back, if you wanted properly exposed images, using camera settings where the flash is providing virtually all of the light.


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Old Jun 10, 2006, 10:21 PM   #17
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That's quite the shindig you've photographed there, JimC.

Another option would be to use an external flash and bounce it off the ceiling.

I usually shoot flash at 1/250th but that's the highest sync I can obtain on my 20D.

My father used to shoot at 1/60th a second and get good results.

I shoot my day to day stuff at 1/125th.

-- Terry




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Old Jun 28, 2006, 1:00 AM   #18
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Re the shot taken by Jim C. How a perfectly innocent shot can catch you out. Hope the man in the background doesn`t show it to his wife. A bit of sleuthing shows the lady isn`t married ( no wedding ring) but looks like he is having a great time.
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Old Jun 29, 2006, 10:19 PM   #19
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I've not scoured every post in this thread but, something as simple as a heavy-duty chain (the type used for key-chains & dog-tags, but thicker), connected to a camera tripod mount works great. I used a keyring loop to attach to the bottom af a tripod mount tightening thingy. Run the chain through the loop & fasten it, drop it to the ground & step on it with one foot, while pulling up on the chain with the camera......instant solid platform (plus you can turn the camera to whatever angle you want).
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