Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Tips & Tricks

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 28, 2006, 11:31 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 19
Default

Its may be a silly questions, but most of photographer always try hard to avoid hands shaking while taking shots and on many articles they always saying lean or try looking for any form of support like leaning on wall or keep your lefthand tight to your body, hold your breath when you pressed the shutter release.etc etc//,,,,,,,,

Is there any combination of body,legs and our hands that we can follow methodically every time we started to bring the camera to our eye level start for shooting?

Come on guys,,......... share your expert skill on how to avoid shaking to beginners photographer like me, becoz if one get used to do handheld the rightway, later its becomes a good habit and easier to have a less blurr pictures cause by shaking problem..........
Shakyhands is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old May 28, 2006, 12:27 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
TheGhost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 103
Default

For starters, get something with IS (Image Stabilization). It makes all the difference in the world. Here in Toronto we have a "Doors Open" event. I've been in bank vaults and inadequately lit rooms. I hand held shots for as long as 1/3 a second and IS pulled through 100% of the time.

Now if you don't have IS, get a tripod as that's the next best thing (not accepted in some places though). A tripod by itself is not usually enough though. If your camera supports timed mode or mirror lockup, make sure to set one of those options. Or if not that, get a remote shutter releaser. Why? As your camera sits comfortably on the tripod, you end up shaking the whole thing just to press the shutter button. This will be noticeable on longer exposed shots (typically anything longer than 1/4 a second).

The above two approaches cost $$$. If that's not what you're looking for, then really the best way to eliminate camera shake is to practice. You need to relax your muscles so that they don't vibe so much. Here are some things I do when I get the shakes and there's nothing for me to lean or lay on.
1) Cross my arms close and tightly and lay the camera on my left upper arm (raise up your arms to eye level). This produces a smoother camera shake and is easier to control.
2) Breathe in some carbon dioxide. It will make you feel drowsy, and thus relaxed. Just cover your mouth with your hands and breathe normally for about half a minute.
TheGhost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 3, 2006, 5:56 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
msantos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 561
Default

The best is getting a camera or lens with image stabilization (IS, or OIS). Panasonic has cheap and very good cameras with OIS.

The other way, of course, is using a tripod or monopod. If you need speeds to 1 sec or more, it is also a good idea using a remote shutter-


Talking about positions, put your left elbow on your stomach, hold the camera cith the left hand, frame the picture, free all the air in your plumbs and shoot. With this position and a panasonic camera (OIS) I've done handheld picts at 1 sec with no blur
msantos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 3, 2006, 6:28 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,234
Default

The above advice is very good. About all I would add is to NOT use the LCD for composing and shooting, This requires you to hold the camera away from your face and increases the likelihood of shake. Using a viewfinder gives you a three-point brace for the camera, which is more stable. If you have the time when shooting, to compose the shot, also compose yourself. Relax into it.

The Marine Corps used to teach shooting with the mnemonic BRASS

B- Breathe. Take a deep breath, and, when ready to shoot,

R - Release. Release half the breath.

A - Aim. For picture taking, compose shot.

S - Slack. Take up slack in trigger. For photos, this would be equivalent to half-press shutter for focus and exposure.

S - Squeeze trigger (shutter all the way)

Run thru this when you shoot hand-held, and after a while it becomes second nature. Using available rests is also a good idea if shutter speeds are low.

Brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 4, 2006, 2:20 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 19
Default

my appreciation to msantos and vtphotog, both give me the very much advised i am looking for.

as you said the more we practise the correct way it become our second nature .... and at the end of the day we got a better blurr less pictures.

I almost forgot to thank to MR. ghost buster - you done it again - I did try breathing a full carbon dioxide and almost "fly" lucky I am not die yet ....................just I am getting more shakyhands:-):-):-)
Shakyhands is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 4, 2006, 8:23 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Corpsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 879
Default

Here's a couple threads I started on this topic illustrating how to stabilize a shot with the help of the Panasonic FZ30's stabilization. There are plenty of example photos.

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=23

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=23
Corpsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 5, 2006, 2:31 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
terry@softreq.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,539
Default

I suppose if you shot at a shutter speed of1/500th, I'd imagine that would cancel the shaking.


terry@softreq.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 6, 2006, 12:00 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 19
Default

Hi Terry,

every one knew that Terry, its the situation and condition of the picture that we would like to takes is most what we facing up - low light / indoor shots/ party shots which most likely 1/500 is out of question to be use.
anyway thank yu for your words !
shakyhands
Shakyhands is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2006, 12:42 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
msantos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 561
Default

[email protected] escribió:
Quote:
I suppose if you shot at a shutter speed of1/500th, I'd imagine that would cancel the shaking.


:blah: Good Idea!!! I'll try it. :?
msantos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2006, 9:46 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
terry@softreq.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,539
Default

Shakyh ands,Some Nikons let you shoot with a flash at 1/500th.*That could work for indoor situations I suppose.-- Terry*
terry@softreq.com is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:28 AM.