Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Tripods and Heads

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 13, 2006, 11:13 PM   #1
Member
 
TedM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 62
Default

Hello all,

I'm looking to replace my current Trikon (who?!) tripod for something that will last me a long while.

Keep in mind I'm VERY much a hobbyist and VERY much a beginner.

I currently use a Nikon D50 with the biggest lens I currently have being a 55 to 200 mm telephoto.

The criteria I basically want in a tripod is:

1. Not terribly expensive (teacher's budget and all! )

2. Quick release

3. Tilting at 90 degrees so I can take vertical shots.

4. Not terribly long folded (I can attach my tripod to my backpack/camera bag.

Any and all advice would be very much appreciated! Thanks much!

Ted


Edit: I saw in another thread this link and checked it out... feedback?

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...320&is=REG
TedM is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 14, 2006, 6:31 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 42
Default

The 3021Pro tripod is a very good one, but not sure if it would be what you want. You mentioned securing to your backpack, so I assume you're looking for a tripod to take on hikes. Only you can decide if the approx. 5 lb. weight of this tripod (w/o head) will be okay for you. Other than that, this is a very versatile and stable unit that would give you years of good service.
yendikeno is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2007, 6:41 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4
Default

Consider getting a compact tripod with a ballhead. They are lighter because they are smaller. The obvious limitation is that one has to find a wall, a car, a rock, a railing, a table, or some such object to set it on.

The tradeoff is a matter of probablility. There is a certain probability you won't be able to find something to set the tripod and camera on when you see the shot you want. There is also a certain probability that you won't have your tripod with you when you see the shot you want. For most people the larger and heavier the tripod, the greater the likelihood it will be at home when you see the shot. You have to decide which is the greater of the two likelihoods for you.

If the two probabilities are equal, the decider might be that life is pleasanter carrying a small light thing than a large heavy one.

A middle case is a monopod. It will be full height, fold up pretty small, and function as a walking stick in addition to a camera support. For all but exposures longer than maybe 1/16 or so a monopod is pretty good. Quicker to set up than a tripod too.

You might want to re-think the idea of getting a really good (i.e. expensive) tripod that you will have a long time. It always seems like it should work that way, but it doesn't.

First, technology changes. Imagine you had invested in a really good aluminum tripod with a panhead. When ballheads and carbon fiber came out you would have found yourself stuck with an expensive obsolete product that you no longer wanted.
Second, you change. You might become a much more avid photographer than you are now and find that the tripod that seemed great a year ago is inadequate. You might lose interest in photography and become interested in sudoku and fast women, or even slow women and the resulting small children. Your tripod would become expensive closet rummage. (Small children, particularly one's own, are great photo subjects, but trying to photograph them from a tripod is hopeless when they are awake.)

Third, things are never quite what they seem in the store. A tripod can be really good and still have some little thing about it or missing from it that starts getting on your nerves after a month and drives you crazy after two.

Much of what one wants in a tripod can be had from Circuit City for $30. When (and perhaps even if) that comes to feel unsatisfactory, you will then have a much better idea of what you want and don't want. I am certain you will save the $30 many times over on your subsequent purchase.
jackkessler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2007, 7:32 PM   #4
Member
 
TedM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 62
Default

Hi Jack,

Thanks very much for your response and feedback! Definitely see your point about not spending mucho bucks on a tripod right off the bat.

Ted
TedM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 22, 2007, 8:55 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

Not a bad plan so long as you are using cheap lenses. Ones you don't mind having on your camera when the tripod fails - pitching your camera lens first onto a rock.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23, 2007, 7:04 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 198
Default

Or, if you use expensive lenses, you can mount them using the tripod socket on the lens itself, so that they are balanced, and hence will not pitch forward onto rocks. Another possibility is to make sure that there are no rocks on the ground in front of where you set the tripod.


BillDrew wrote:
Quote:
Not a bad plan so long as you are using cheap lenses. Ones you don't mind having on your camera when the tripod fails - pitching your camera lens first onto a rock.
DougJGreen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2007, 7:57 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

DougJGreen wrote:
Quote:
Or, if you use expensive lenses, you can mount them using the tripod socket on the lens itself, so that they are balanced, and hence will not pitch forward onto rocks. Another possibility is to make sure that there are no rocks on the ground in front of where you set the tripod.
Wow. If you are that good at balance stuff, you have no reason to use a tripod at at all. Just stick your camera on top of a fence post, or on top of a stick. Or perhaps just levitate the camera or suspend it from baloons.

A cheap tripod is likely to be very expensive.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2007, 12:23 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 198
Default

Bill, I really DON'T think that it has taken any particular GREAT skill on my part to have gone 30 years in photography without ever having a tripod pitch forward and throw my lens on the rocks. And for around the first 20 years of that, I used a $30 tripod. If, as seems apparent, you have clearly been less successful in this regard, perhaps you ought to consult a medical specialist who can do something about your inadequate hand-eye coordination.

Oh, and BTW, a $5 beanbag is also VERY useful for using, say, a fencepost as a stable mount with long, expensive lenses. The trick is to actually HOLD the camera when you are shooting with your camera lens sitting on the beanbag between the fenceposts. Oh, and does a monopod count as "on top of a stick"? Because I also do that, and not once has the camera pitched forward onto the lens. Again, the trick is to actually hold the camera when shooting. Or, as I said previously, you (or at least anyone with the slightest coordination - perhaps you don't qualify) could mount the camera/lens on a tripod in a manner where it is balanced enough not to pitch forward.

BillDrew wrote:
Quote:
If you are that good at balance stuff, you have no reason to use a tripod at at all. Just stick your camera on top of a fence post, or on top of a stick.
DougJGreen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2007, 5:45 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

I agree: monopods and bean bags work well for stablizing a camera. Having your hand on the camera while the shutter activates doesn't add to the stability, but with care and for shortish exposures (less than a second or three) it is OK. I like using my monopod as a solid walking stick - it has enough solidity to stop a charging rhino so I can really lean onto it huffing my way up a hill.

I have had tripods collapse - caught the camera both times before it hit the ground. Once was with a cheap tripod that the wind blew over. If I had hung enough rocks on that thing to hold it down, it would have broken. Another time was with a solid Bogen when I didn't tighten one of the legs - learned about spending the time to lfigure out how to use gear with that one.

Having been dinging about with cameras for about 55 years (and I didn't start real young), I am getting a bit to stiff to want to jump quick to catch a falling camera. So, yes, I guess I qualify as an incompetent, uncoordinated, inadiquate, ... type who really does nead some well built camera support. Not being perfect, I need the help of a good tripod.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:40 PM.