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Old Apr 6, 2009, 8:52 AM   #1
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I have tried flat bed scanners and I just don't get the quality I want, mostly because the focus is not good. I have seen some equipment advertised on TV that makes it look easy but I wonder just how good they are. If someone had converted slided with good results please let me know. John
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Old Apr 6, 2009, 9:00 AM   #2
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Welcome to the forums.

I'd look at dedicated film scanners for best results (for example, Nikon's COOLSCAN series).

http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Ni...ers/index.page

Make sure any scanner you buy has drivers for the operating system you're using (for example, it's not uncommon to find scanners with no drivers available for 32 bit or 64 bit Vista).

You may also want to browse through our Image & Film Scanners Forum for ideas and tips.

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Old Apr 6, 2009, 9:16 AM   #3
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P.S.

Although most are a bit dated now, you'll find some reviews of both flatbed and dedicated film scanners here:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/digi_....html#scanners

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Old Apr 6, 2009, 9:26 AM   #4
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Other ideas:

From time to time, you'll see members that mention using a slide projector and taking photos of the projected image. You can also find adapters and bellows that let you take photos of slides with some digital camera models.

Depending on the number of slides you need to convert, you may also want to consider using a professional service. Here's one I've seen mentioned as doing a good job with large quantities of prints. I don't know how their slide scanning service stacks up.

http://www.scanmyphotos.com/

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Old Apr 6, 2009, 9:59 AM   #5
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Thanks Jim. you have already been a great help. I figured many others have either had little success withtheir conversions or have never attempted it. Between myself and friends and family we have hundreds and maybe approaching a thousand 35mm slides. I tried taking photos of slides projected on a screen and even found that those were slightly out of focus.

I like your Forum. thanks again. John
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Old Apr 8, 2009, 11:21 PM   #6
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One thing to note about slide conversion. If the slides were from higher ASA film like 200 or 400 scanning at very high resolutions just looks grainy.

I have an Epson Perfection 3600. I started scanning slides from 200-400 ASA film at 3600dpi and was never happy with them. I cut that back to 1200 dpi and they look fine, I just can't enlarge and crop to a portion of the slide and get any thing decent. They are fine for powerpoints on the computer and small prints. They also scan alot faster and are much smaller files to store.

I recently scanned some very old Ektachrome 64 slides and they looked great at higher resolutions. Age had messed with the colors, but that can be fixed in Photoshop. I imagine the old Kodachrome 25 film would scan nicely at higher resolutions.

I used higher ASA film when I didn't wish to lug around a tripod for low light situations.
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 7:20 AM   #7
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:idea:Great information. Most of my slides are ASA 400 on a scattering of Ektachrome film so that inside information is real nice. Thanks so much.
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 7:42 AM   #8
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I started filmscanning years ago using a 'Scanwit' SCSI filmscanner, before Ibought my first digital camerain 2002.I got into digital photography and image editing that way. I did get some very good results, suitable for big enlargements, but it was laborious.

I made some feeble attempts to transcribe some of my thousands of negs & slides, but gave up because of the magnitude (and difficulty) of the task. I know filmscanners have moved on a lot since, but I found software from Ed Hamrick invaluable as a replacement for the software that came with the scanner. I just confirmed that his website, a mine of information on current scanning, is still alive & well at http://www.hamrick.com/. This may give you some ideas on scanners. In the old pre-www days he ran a thriving email-based discussion & advice group. I'm still tempted occasionally to get a new scanner.

I have however, made a little progress since projecting the slides on a white card in a darkroom, and recording them, with commentary,using a Video 8 camcorder. The quality is pretty poor, but preserves the memories. Of course thatformat is now also obsolete, so I'll have to retranscribe the tapesto DVD.

We'll still have to make sure we shift our digital images to each new medium as it comes along, but at least in principle it won't degrade any more (until current jpeg becomes extinct, horrors)!

The wallsof our home bear many pictures from filmscanned negs and slides. This one hangs over the fireplace as a 19 by 13inch framed print. You don't have to worry about the quality, if you get good equipment and are willing to put in the effort.

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