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-   What Camera Should I Buy? (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/what-camera-should-i-buy-80/)
-   -   Best of the Best (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/what-camera-should-i-buy-80/best-best-143757/)

goodtall Jul 9, 2008 3:23 PM


Okay, I am going to purchase 1 of the 15 cameras listed on Steve's Ultra Compact-Pocketable List. I just don't know which one to choose. My needs are simple, I need a ultra compact digital camera for indoor/low light photos. And we all know thereare no digital cameras made "specifically" for indoor/low light photos. But, surely there is 1 on this best list that stands above the rest that will work for my purposes. Please provide me some feedback and cast your vote for which one I should buy. Thanks.

Ultra Compact - Pocketable List

Samsung L210

Pentax Optio M50

Nikon Coolpix S210

Sony Cyber-Shot W150

Canon Powershot SD1100 IS

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS3

Canon Powershot SD790 IS

Sony Cyber-Shot T100

Sony Cyber-Shot T200

Sony Cyber-Shot W120

Canon Powershot SD770 IS

Casio Exilim EX-Z77

Canon Powershot SD750

Casio Exilim EX-Z1080

Sony Cyber-Shot W200

JimC Jul 9, 2008 3:36 PM

goodtall wrote:
Quote:


Okay, I am going to purchase 1 of the 15 cameras listed on Steve's Ultra Compact-Pocketable List. I just don't know which one to choose. My needs are simple, I need a ultra compact digital camera for indoor/low light photos.

That's not exactly simple, unless you don't mind blurry photos.

What kind of "indoor/low light" photos? If you mean without a flash, and your subjects are not stationary, none of those are going to work well.

If you mean with a flash, make sure to read Steve's review conclusion sections for models you consider. That's where you'll find some discussion on image quality (both indoors with flash and outdoors), Autofocus Speed, etc.

Quote:

And we all know thereare no digital cameras made "specifically" for indoor/low light photos.


Try a dSLR (with much higher usable ISO speeds compared to the pocketable models with very tiny sensors, which influences how sensitive the sensor is to light), and brighter available lenses (compared to the relatively dim lenses you find on a subcompact model, which require a slower shutter speed for the same lighting and ISO speed). They're not exactly pocketable, though. ;-)

You may want to look in the used market for a Fuji F20, F30, or F40fd model. They're better than most smaller cameras at higher ISO speeds. But, they may not work well either, depending on what you mean by "indoor/low light" photos.

I'd be more specific for better suggestions from forum members here (I'd give more information on the subjects and conditions, and if you can use a flash or not).


goodtall Jul 9, 2008 5:05 PM

Okay, here is some more help for you....

1st: Must be a Pocket Camera

2nd: Indoors/Inside the house photos, basement where Flash is a must, because of low light area. Photos will be of my kids and playroom (which is the basement where their toys are). Kids will be kids and moving constantly. Pocket camera for on the spot photos is a must...I can't be lugging around a 5lb SLR camera with these subjects. Plus I own a bar where I like to take photos of my patrons that has very little lighting....so a strong flash is important.

I am no expert when it comes to digital cameras but know they are horrible for inside photo taking because they are not made specifically for inside/low light conditiions.

Jim you threw in monkey wrench when you suggested the Fuji series....ahhh, they are not on Steves List.

Hope this helps and Thanks again.

JimC Jul 9, 2008 5:23 PM

goodtall wrote:
Quote:

Jim you threw in monkey wrench when you suggested the Fuji series....ahhh, they are not on Steves List.
Actually, the Fujifilm FinePix F20 is still on Steve's Best Cameras List (it's in the Compact Category), even though it's a discontinued model now (which is a bit unusual for this list).

Most of the models on it are going to be newer cameras (but, just because a given camera isn't on the list, doesn't mean that's it's not a good choice, depending on what you want to shoot, the conditions you want to shoot in, the viewing/print sizes desired, use for the images, etc.). Some models you can still find have been on the list and since replaced by newer cameras, too.

If you can use a flash, higher ISO speed performance isn't as important (although that's still a desirable feature so you can get more flash range, as well as let in more light from sources other than the flash into the image). But, I'd pay close attention to Autofocus Reliability/Speed (and you can expect slower performance in lower light). Ditto for flash range and recycle times (these features are normally discussed in a camera's review conclusion section there).

If you could stand a bit larger camera, a model that can use an external flash (where you can bounce it for a more even and diffused light source, versus the more focused light of an internal flash) would be a better bet for the conditions you're describing. That would also help to reduce redeye (the closer the flash is to a camera's lens, the greater your potential for redeye).

'

AndyfromVA Jul 9, 2008 5:47 PM

My picks would be the Sony W150, the Casio 1080, the Panasonic Fx35 or the Fuji F100fd.

dr_spock Jul 9, 2008 8:33 PM

I think the Fujifilm Fxxfd line are pretty good compared to others of the same size for flash and lower light.

goodtall Jul 9, 2008 10:07 PM

Thanks and Wow....I wasn't even considering a Fuji product (thinking the Sony's and Canon's, etc, etc,were mentioned most, therefor the best). But I am impressed with the Fuji F100fd camera for sure now. Now I notice some reviews show they had a problem with pink lines? I don't know what this means. But I see where Broadway Photo has the best price on it.

rinniethehun Jul 9, 2008 10:18 PM

Good camera - maybe not so good store...

http://www.resellerratings.com/store/Broadway_Photo

the Hun



goodtall Jul 10, 2008 8:31 AM

Thanks for the info, rinniethehun. The good thing is that most internet vedors will match prices. Greatly appreciate this for sure. Nobody wants to get ripped off.

Check this priceout: http://www.86photovideo.com/products...oduct_id=18825

Any more suggestions on the camera I should buy? Is the Fuji F100fd what I need??????


JimC Jul 10, 2008 10:00 AM

Always check out a vendor using resellerratings.com

http://www.resellerratings.com/store...et_Photo_Video

If a price looks too good to be true...

Suggested reading:
How to buy a digital camera without being robbed



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