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-   -   Best Macro Camera - please help and advise (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/what-camera-should-i-buy-80/best-macro-camera-please-help-advise-79323/)

pelfed Jan 29, 2006 3:18 PM

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Hi All

I'm after a digital camera that can take shots like the image below.

I realise that there is a lot to macro photography having browsed the web for info, but what i would like is a camera that can just do the job as simple as possible.

I don't really want to spend money on xtra lenses etc or special gear, just a camera that does the job...maybe a specialised macro camera?

This will probably cost alot?

Hards80 Jan 29, 2006 5:36 PM

to do that, you will need a very very expensive set... do you realize what magnification that is... wow..


if you are interested in doing more normal macro work, the canon s2is is quite capable in its macro capabilities and is relatively easy to work with..

JimC Jan 29, 2006 5:47 PM

I'd bet that's a crop a larger image (hence the name 49172157.drinking_eye_crop_small.jpg I see for it). ;-)


JimC Jan 29, 2006 6:10 PM

pelfed wrote:
Quote:

Hi All

I'm after a digital camera that can take shots like the image below.
That's a crop (you can tell by the filename alone). In other words, someone cut off the outside edges, leaving the desired portion in the center. It's still pretty good detail, though (someone probably used a reversed lens to shoot it). Where did you find it?

Quote:

I realise that there is a lot to macro photography having browsed the web for info, but what i would like is a camera that can just do the job as simple as possible.

I don't really want to spend money on xtra lenses etc or special gear, just a camera that does the job...maybe a specialised macro camera?
Most non-DSLR Digital Cameras do a pretty good job at macros (but, they won't be able to capture an area that small).

IMO, the best you'll find for macros without buying any lenses would be the Nikon Swivel Bodied Coolpix Models (the older discontinued ones, not the new S4).

I'd check Ebay for the Nikon Coolpix 990, 995 or 4500 models. The older 900, 900s and 950 can also do extremely well (but they don't give you as much control of aperture as you'd get with the later 990, 995, or 4500 models).

These older swivel bodied Coolpix models can all "fill the frame" with a subject about 2/3" across with virtually no distortion (because their macro mode can work at the "sweet spot" of the lens at about half zoom).

But, keep in mind that you'll need to be pretty close to a smaller subject to fill the frame (and the insects may not cooperate). ;-)

A DSLR gives you more flexibility, since you can shoot from further away with the appropriate lens. But, you say you don't want to worry about lenses.

Many of the photos you see in the reviews herewere taken with a Swivel Bodied Coolpix model (990, 995, 4500). Steve has probably reviewed more cameras than anyone around over the years. So, when someone like Steve uses one for his own closeups, you can bet it's a pretty good tool for the job. See his response to a question about it here, when a forum member noticed how much detail there was in things like dials and buttons in the images:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=17611

If you want to see how detailed the closeups from one of these cameras can be,here is a photo of a cointhat Steve tookwith an old 3MPNikon Coolpix 990 (straight from the camera with nomodifications or cropping).

http://www.steves-digicams.com/nikon...2/DSCN0076.JPG

You can probably pick one up for under $200 if you shop around on the used market and keep an eye on Ebay listings.

I've personally owned the Nikon Coolpix 950 and 990 (and I still have the 950). They're great cameras for macros (but, they are not speed demons, especially by current standards).


superakuma Jan 29, 2006 8:21 PM

My camera can do that....sort of with a macro lense. I have a Fuji S5200 with the Raynox CDR-250 macro lense. That lense is amazing. I bought it for about $64 at bhphoto.com shipped. You can get it for about $50 shipped on ebay if you dont mind buying from ebay.

Here is a sample shot that I took with it. Its a peice of RICE that I found on the ground.
http://stevesforums.com/forums/attachment.php?id=49966


At the same distance but with the lense off and not zoomed in.
http://stevesforums.com/forums/attachment.php?id=49965


The picture is NOT CROPPED!! I only shrunk it so it can be uploaded easier. The quality isnt that great because I took the picture at night time with flash.

audioedge Jan 29, 2006 8:38 PM

good effort super, but not quite same league... you can see the sphericals on the eye of a fly in originally cropped image

jacks Jan 29, 2006 10:00 PM

Most point and shoot digitals can do pretty good macro shots as their tiny lenses and sensors allow them to focus very close to the lens - you can shove the camera right up against what you're shooting so the magnification is very good. Not having to use an optical viewfinder to frame the shot is also an advantage here. If your subject isn't going to run away and you can get a lot of light on it, that's fine.
P&S have their limits but to do better with an slr you really need some good gear. A good macro lens, tripod and lighting set-up, and these are going to cost. A lot.

bernabeu Jan 29, 2006 10:12 PM

fuji s7000:

bernabeu Jan 29, 2006 10:14 PM

fuji s7000:

Pinchas Jan 30, 2006 10:21 AM

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Strangely enough, the Sony Mavica's of the last century did a fine job of getting very close -just an inch or less than 3 cm - to an object. This pic was takenon abright day in London's Kew Gardens, with my old Sony Mavica FD73, a 0.3 Mp oldie. I reached out with the camera inside the flower, and the result was stunning, at least for such a "humble" piece of digital antiquity.


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