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Old Oct 13, 2006, 12:29 PM   #31
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If you really want image stabilization (or shake reduction) on a DSLR, you might want to take a serious look at the Pentax K100D. As I said earlier, I own that camera and I love it. It is a full-featured DSLR that takes great photos, but it also has a "Full-Auto" mode for beginners. You can learn the camera as you go. It has the stabilization built in to the camera body, so any inexpensive lens will be stabilized.

You could buy that camera with the 18-55mm lens and add a 75-300mm lens, and still only have about $750 invested.
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 12:29 PM   #32
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jeepsr4girlz wrote:
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kenbalbari wrote:
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Does your 75-300 lens say "ultrasonic" on it anywhere, or USM? The USM would be on the wheel after where it say f4-5.6.
Yes, does say f/4-5.6 III
My apologies, I did answer all of your question completely.

It does say f/4-5.6 III, EF 75-300mm, Canon

On lens it also has 1.5m/4.9ft, 1:4-5.6 III, Canon zoom lens EF 75-300mm

It also has a little switch to choose AF or MF
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 12:31 PM   #33
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jeepsr4girlz wrote:
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Do I really NEED this feature or is this more for sports phoographers and such?
No, you don't NEED stabilization, but it is really nice to have. It means a lot more "keepers".
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 12:42 PM   #34
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So, if I am willing to spend $1,000-1,500 TOTAL, what would you recommend?
I would suggest sticking to an entry level DSLR, and putting a bit more into your lens selection. Just checking quickly, neither of the lenses you bought arre particularly good. They're not bad for the price. But a bit below average overall. The lens is a big part of the final picture quality.

Don't worry much about 8MP vs. 10MP. The larger size won't make much difference. You really won't see much difference in prints as large as 8x10. If you are going to often make large prints, it matters a bit more.

The camera you bought is a brand new model. It's mostly an incremental upgrade over the last years model. But because it just came out, you paying alot for the improvements. I expect the price will fall $100 or more in the next 2 months. I think that's money you might be better off putting towards better lenses, or elsewhere, rather than the latest camera, unless you know you really need the additional features (like a slightly faster autofocus).

Between entry level models, like the E-500, Pentax *istDS, K100D, or K110D, or Nikon D50 or D70, or the Rebel XT, you should also consider which feels best in your hand. Did you hold and try out the E-500 and the XTi at the shop before buying? Which felt best to you? This is an individual thing, some people find the Canons too small, others prefer them. The Pentax and Nikon are a bit larger, with larger grips.

Both the Nikon and Olympus models have unusually good kit lenses. The others may not be bad for the price, but you may be better buying camera only and buying a better lens seperately. For most of your outdoor shots, you will have a fast enough shutter that IS won't really matter. But if you want IS, the K100D is the most economical option, as even those cheap lense on it will then be stabilized, instead of paying more for IS lenses.






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Old Oct 13, 2006, 1:00 PM   #35
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kenbalbari wrote:
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So, if I am willing to spend $1,000-1,500 TOTAL, what would you recommend?
I would suggest sticking to an entry level DSLR, and putting a bit more into your lens selection. Just checking quickly, neither of the lenses you bought arre particularly good. They're not bad for the price. But a bit below average overall. The lens is a big part of the final picture quality.

Don't worry much about 8MP vs. 10MP. The larger size won't make much difference. You really won't see much difference in prints as large as 8x10. If you are going to often make large prints, it matters a bit more.

The camera you bought is a brand new model. It's mostly an incremental upgrade over the last years model. But because it just came out, you paying alot for the improvements. I expect the price will fall $100 or more in the next 2 months. I think that's money you might be better off putting towards better lenses, or elsewhere, rather than the latest camera, unless you know you really need the additional features (like a slightly faster autofocus).

Between entry level models, like the E-500, Pentax *istDS, K100D, or K110D, or Nikon D50 or D70, or the Rebel XT, you should also consider which feels best in your hand. Did you hold and try out the E-500 and the XTi at the shop before buying? Which felt best to you? This is an individual thing, some people find the Canons too small, others prefer them. The Pentax and Nikon are a bit larger, with larger grips.

Both the Nikon and Olympus models have unusually good kit lenses. The others may not be bad for the price, but you may be better buying camera only and buying a better lens seperately. For most of your outdoor shots, you will have a fast enough shutter that IS won't really matter. But if you want IS, the K100D is the most economical option, as even those cheap lense on it will then be stabilized, instead of paying more for IS lenses.





Pentax K100D and the Canon PowerShot S3 IS are the only ones I have found that offer the built in image stabilizer. I guess this is not a necessity, but makes it nicer. Of course with being digital, I can review and toss the not so good pics.

What about the Olympus Evolt 500 duel lens kit? $699.00 and coudl buy even another better lens? Comes with 40-150mm and 14-45 mm lens. 10x optical zoom, Zuiko digital lenses.
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 1:09 PM   #36
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I seriously considered the Olympus E-volt too. The reason I decided against it was because you're paying for that 40-150mm lens, but Ididn't feel it would give me enough "reach". In other words, I'd still be buying another telephoto lens anyways. I also liked the idea of getting the shake-reduction feature in the Pentax K100D. Like I said above, you can get the K100D with the 18-55mm lens along with a separate 75-300mm lens and only have around $750 invested in all of it. And you will have the shake-reduction in the camera body.
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 1:12 PM   #37
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Most of the digicams suggested, without removable lenses, have the IS feature. The Sony H2 and H5, and the Panazonc Fz7 all have it. The Fuji S6000 doesn't , but it has an anti-shake mode that instead uses higher ISO to use a faster shutter speed. This works because the Fuji has better high ISO performance than the other digicams.

The DSLR cameras, however, all are better than any of the digicams at higher ISO. The main reason is they are usign a much larger sensor.

Digital SLR cameras were designed originally to use the same lenses as film SLR cameras. Originally they used an electronic sensor designed to be the same size as the film. Now the sensors are a bit smaller, but they are still much larger in the SLR style cameras than in compact digital cameras.

This means that a DSLR will be better than the compacts in many action or low light situations where you need higher ISOs. Higher ISO is the evivalent of using a faster film in the film camera. Only you don't have to change any film, you push a button, or let the camera automatically decide bsaed on the light what setting to use.

The IS will come into play most in lower light situtions where you are trying to shoot with a shutter speed under 1/100s. It won't come into play for sports or action shots, since you will need faster shutter speeds anyway to capture the subject without blur.

Final point about the lenses. You will generally get better results with a good lens on a low end DSLR than a good DSLR with cheap lenses. So a $500 camera and a good $400 lens would be better than the $800 camera you bought with $100-$200 lenses. You want a good amount of zoom for wildlife, but ood quality lense with high zooms get expensive. A 300mm lens for $200 is often not going to be too sharp.

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Old Oct 13, 2006, 1:28 PM   #38
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Wow, looks like you jumped into unknown territory

Don't worry though, you'll learn quickly. Right now it's all confusing numbers and letters, but after some reading you'll know what it means.

This might be helpful to you: http://www.dpreview.com/learn/

TDN
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 2:14 PM   #39
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I seriously considered the Olympus E-volt too. The reason I decided against it was because you're paying for that 40-150mm lens, but I didn't feel it would give me enough "reach". In other words, I'd still be buying another telephoto lens anyways. I also liked the idea of getting the shake-reduction feature in the Pentax K100D.
Gadgetnut:

I think the shake reduction is a real advantage of the K100D. But I think the E-500 is actually very good if you want affordabble long zoom lenses.

For something like professional quality sports photography, it might make sense to go with Canon, which has cameras with better burst rates and quicker autofocus available. But those photographeras are going to need $1000+ lenses, and end up spending $2000++ overall to get what they want.

But for occasional action shots, any of these will do well enough. I think a good way to compare is to look at some of the third party lenses that are available in all mounts. For example, a Sigma f2.8 150mm prime lens is available for all of these at around the same price. On a Nikon or Pentax (1.5x factor), it will be a 225mm equivalent. On a Canon Rebel (1.6x factor), it will be a 240mm equivalent. On the K100D, it will be a 225mm equivalent, but it will also be stabilized, so you might say you are getting significantly better value for the same lens than with Nikon or Canon. On the E-500, it will be a 300mm equivalent--and you could also say you are getting better value.

The Sigma 50-500 f4.0-6.3, available for about $900, will give you a 1000mm equivalent:
http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/215/cat/31

And the Olympus 50-200 f2.8-3.5 is one of the best lenses made, for about $850. That gives you a reach of 400mm, but with f3.5 on the long end, you wont have any problems extending that with a teleconverter either. Maybe even a 2x TC?
http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...duct/38/cat/15

There really isn't a large selection of four-thirds mount lenses available yet, but what is there is generally very good quality and value.

The trade off for the smaller sensor in the four thirds mount, is that lighter lenses with better value per dollar for long zooms, comes at the cost of a bit more "noise" at higher ISOs, as they are trying to squeeze those MP out of a smaller sensor. But I don't think it's a bad tradeoff--though that depends on what you need more for .

And when it comes to Pentax, one advantage you have is in the number of older lenses that can be picked up cheaply on ebay, and such. There aren't going to be many used lenses out there for Olympus. Wheras you might find some older Pentax lenses out there for $100 or less which turn out to give perfectly acceptable results.

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Old Oct 13, 2006, 2:25 PM   #40
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I agree. I didn't mean to imply that the Olympus E-volt wasn't a great camera. I'm sure it is. I was just explaining my reasons for choosing the Pentax. With a little practice, I'm sure either one will produce amazing prints.
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