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Old Oct 11, 2006, 5:01 PM   #1
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Hey everyone,
I'm just looking at getting a new digital camera for myself, looking to spend somewhere in the range of $300-400, I don't want anything super fancy, but I do preferably want something that has an ultra zoom lens (at least 10x) if possible. What would a good option be for this sort of product. I was looking at something like possibly a fujifilm s5200, canon s2, or olympus s-510uz, kodak z612, ect... I've been looking around, and also found a one a nice looking kodak p880 at costco http://www.costco.ca/en-CA/Browse/Pr...v=&browse=
but it only has 5.8x zoom, but it does have 8mp, and manual focus, zoom, wide angle. This has probably been the most promising camera I've looked into so far, and I'm really liking it...

Edit: Also if I buy at costco if I would ever have any problems I could promptly return it, no questions asked...

Any help would be greatly appreciated, like I said I'm looking for something around the 300-400 range ($CND), but can go maybe up to 500, but I don't want to go any higher than that. I'm just a beginner, but I want something that will last. Another question I have is would I be better off to possibly go used rather than buying new?

Edit: Also another option someone gave to me is the Panasonic FZ7, how does this compare to the p880

Thanks!
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Old Oct 11, 2006, 6:28 PM   #2
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Turbo,

I think it would be easier for us to help you if you could make your own mind up. First you said you wanted an ultrazoom (at least 10x), then you said your #1 pick was a camera that only has a 5.8x zoom...because it was...nice looking?

If you told us what type of pictures you wanted to take, we would have a better idea of which camera might better suit you. The Kodak has some nice features, like the manual zoom and focus rings, and a very wide angle lens. However, if you plan on shooting a lot of available light pics (like inside without flash), it doesn't rate too well. It's ISO 400 performance looks pretty noisy, and the ISO 800 and 1600 are only available in a reduced resolution - 0.8 MP - ??? - you could probably do better with a cell phone cam. It's also reported to take a long time to write to the card in the TIFF and RAW modes.

That's why you need to elaborate a bit on your needs.

the Hun

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Old Oct 11, 2006, 6:54 PM   #3
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I find myelf in a similar situation and because price is at least part of the equation I decided on the Panasonic FZ7. 6mp, 12x zoom, and IS. All for under $275.
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Old Oct 11, 2006, 8:57 PM   #4
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I didn't mean it looks nice as in outside looks, I meant the overall camera "looked" like a good option :?

I'd assume most of my shots are going to be more outdoor type stuff. Also the F7Z isn't as cheap compared to the P880 here in Canada. (Both are actually about the same price, in the 400-450 range)

I'm just not sure if I need the zoom to tell you the truth, I have no clue what types of pictures zoom is good for...

I haven't done too much photography before with a "real" camera, I've mostly used the point and shoot type dig cameras, and just wanted to go a little bit deeper into photography.

Again I'm going to be doing mostly outdoor shots I'd assume, sceneries, night shots, ect ect... not too much indoor stuff.
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Old Oct 11, 2006, 10:29 PM   #5
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Just kidding about the "nice looking" crack...I knew what you meant.

Here's a link to help you appreciate what focal lengths mean to your picture taking experience:

http://www.tamron.de/Focal_Length_Co....html?&L=2

If you plan on taking landscapes, a wide angle is best. If you want to take pictures of little birds up on the tops of trees, a stronger telephoto would be in order.

Here's your #1 choice at ISO 400 - that's pretty noisy. As long as most of your pics will be taken outside in bright sunlight, it whould work pretty well. But in low light situations, you may be disappointed.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/kodakp880/page11.asp

Is there one camera that is best at everything? No. You have to decide what is most important to you.

the Hun

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Old Oct 11, 2006, 11:13 PM   #6
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So if I got this right:

P880 is good for more landscape type photos, not so great at lower light levels

The Z7F has better zoom, but still not as good PQ as P880?

Also another question, if in the future I would ever want more zoom, I could get a telphoto attachment, or a fisheye attachment to the lens correct?
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Old Oct 11, 2006, 11:59 PM   #7
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I have a P880. And, I can say... the ISO 400 isn't THAT BAD. The S2 or S3 might be better at that.. but, I don't know.

Anyway, I can highly recommend this camera. If you doing landscapes, and indoors, this wide angle is great. You can even attach an external flash (Say, a Kodak P20 zoom flash) for your indoor stuff, with more natural light. And you can even bouce the flash off the ceiling.


Also, I've heard real good things about the Kodak Z612. Real good reviews, and I've seen some great shots from it.

The picture quality is excellent. ISO 50 is very good. Iso 100 is pretty much the same. ISO 200 is good. Not as good as ISO 100 and ISO 50, but, still very good. ISO 400 is the worst. But, still usuable.

You can look at some of my photos in the Kodak forum, if you want.

Don't know much about the panasonic, accept that its most likely noisier. (Thus, worse for indoor low light photography without flash)

Also, yes, you can add a Kodak 1.4x teleconverter to the P880. As long as you have the 55mm adapter. Also, I find that my camera performs quite qell in low light. The focus is good, especially with the Af light.

Anyway, as the Hun said, there's no all in one camera. So, chose the camera you want depending on what you need out of the camera.

If you want high resolution, wide angle, and really good photo quality, I can very, very highly recommend this camera.

If you need a lkot of zoom, I can't recommend this camera any less. :blah:


Hope this helps.

Cheers.

-En
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 8:50 AM   #8
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Hi there,

So after probably 100 or more hours of obsessive research I decided to get the P880 at that great costco deal.. but then after a little more deliberation I'm not getting it. I will let you in on my reasoning and maybe you can draw some knowledge from it.

It all depends on what you want to photograph. I read the 4 or 5 really indepth reviews of the P880, and then went to the camera store to actually try it out. (never mind that every camera salesman will tell you no, they are just trying to sell you something else).

First the bad:
The P880 takes longer than most other cameras to get ready for the next picture. That is to say *CLICK*...wait...wait...wait...*CLICK*. Most other cameras have maybe 2 waits :!:. This is important if you are taking pictures where the action is moving, like at a party, or with friends, or with kids... dont' even talk to me about sports. P880 users will tell you it's not so bad, and maybe you get used to it, I don't know.

I've read that compared to other cameras on the market, the P880s low light performance isn't the best. Low-light encompasses indoor photography. So if you are having a party and all the lights in the house are on, you should be ok. But once you start turning off the lights it's going to be challenging.

Further, the P880 often takes a while to auto focus in low light. Lots of cameras suffer from this problem, it's their nature, but I think the kodak falls into the less-than-average category here.

Now the good:
The P880, when all forces come together, takes beautiful pictures! The color and the exposure are great. This is bottom line.

The lens is awesome and versatile. Nice wide-angle shots, and the mechanical zoom ring lets you get closer when you need to.

If you like buttons and easy access to necessary features, this camera is for you. There's also a nice thumb-wheel for your right hand. Put the camera in aperture priority mode and you can select an fstop easily.

There's a hot-shoe for a flash, this will help with low light photography.

Conclusion.
For the price, you can't beat this camera. It's a great gateway to really learning about photography, and it will take exquisite pictures.

BUT

Do yourself a favor, go to a camera shop and hold and click around with a few of the models you mentioned. The painfully slow picture to picture recycle rate was a deal breaker for me.

Two more things.
1. The fuji 5200 is deeply discounted these days, a good deal.
2. Don't be swayed by megapixels. Althought the P880 has 8Mpixels, there are far better cameras with lower counts. Unless you intend to print at 8x10 or larger (that's HUGE!) or you plan to heavily crop your images, there's no need to use that as a criteria.

TurboRegal wrote:
Quote:
I didn't mean it looks nice as in outside looks, I meant the overall camera "looked" like a good option :?

I'd assume most of my shots are going to be more outdoor type stuff. Also the F7Z isn't as cheap compared to the P880 here in Canada. (Both are actually about the same price, in the 400-450 range)

I'm just not sure if I need the zoom to tell you the truth, I have no clue what types of pictures zoom is good for...

I haven't done too much photography before with a "real" camera, I've mostly used the point and shoot type dig cameras, and just wanted to go a little bit deeper into photography.

Again I'm going to be doing mostly outdoor shots I'd assume, sceneries, night shots, ect ect... not too much indoor stuff.
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 9:01 AM   #9
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Quote:

But once you start turning off the lights it's going to be challenging.
I think that thiswill be a problem to most cameras if not all?
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 9:34 AM   #10
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Yes, I agree! But there is
  • Good low light performance[/*]
  • OK low light performance[/*]
  • Acceptable low light performance[/*]
  • Unacceptable low light performance[/*]
  • Poor/unusable low light performance[/*]
So it's all about what what's ok for you.

I'll also admit, I don't know how to use the flash, so I always turn it off inside, open the aperture all the way, hold the camera as steady as i can, and click.

I'd rather have my pictures a little blurry and or dark, than have the colors wrong.

BenjaminXYZ wrote:
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Quote:

But once you start turning off the lights it's going to be challenging.
I think that thiswill be a problem to most cameras if not all?
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