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Old Oct 26, 2006, 2:40 PM   #1
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I am getting sickwith researching cameras already. Can I just trust "my product adviser"? :-)I just turned up all the sliders to the max and hey, here's what I've got in order;

The recommended top five:

#1 Olympus EVOLT E-500

#2 Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTi

#3 Olympus EVOLT E-330

#4 Nikon D80

#5 Pentax K100D

Any users of the Olympus EVOLT E-500 can tell me how great that camera really is? (It must be apretty prevalent camera to appearright atthe top)

BTW, I would like to see what you'll guys end up with>>>

My produce adviser.
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Old Oct 26, 2006, 2:49 PM   #2
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I was under the impression you had already made your decision:?. From The D50, to the A100, to the 7D, and most recently a Samsung, it looks like you're on at least your 5 model. When will our resident DSLR expert finally pull the trigger on a DSLR??:?
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Old Oct 26, 2006, 3:02 PM   #3
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Sorry rjseeney, I am no residential expert at all! I am just feeling real bored having just sold off my N1 for U.S. $300+ to my dad. I am feeling pretty uncomfortable walking into a camera store to buy my next camera now, I just don't have the assurance that I'm doing the right thing - to part with $900 (a great sum for me)on some camera...

So that is why I was waiting so long.

I was just thinking of getting the recommended Olympus EvoltE-500 with the Olympus 14-54 mm lens , but I don't think I can afford that combination yet. At the mean time, I would like to hear some experiencewith the Olympus Evolt E-500 dSLR from owners. All those reviewsthat I have read justcouldn't give in the final kick to the goal.

I heard this lens is as good as the R1's Carl Zeiss:





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Old Oct 26, 2006, 4:10 PM   #4
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Quote:
I just turned up all the sliders to the max and hey, here's what I've got in order
I was more selective in what was more important to me (I wouldn't want to get a bad recommendation).

So, I moved the slider labeled "Having Complete Control Instead of Point and Shoot" all the way to the right.

Then, I decided to look for a good Sports camera and moved the slider labeled "Taking Pictures of Action Scenes" all the way to the right, also.

Then, I stepped through the rest and didn't change much, except that I wanted to see models from HP, Vivitar and Mustek.

I heard (via my Sister's, Hair Stylist's Son) that Vivitar is really better than HP for action scenes where you want complete control. Does that sound right to you, or are the HP and Mustek models better for action photography?

I did tell it that I would be willing to spend $1500+ on a camera that met my needs.

It made some recommendation for me, including the Mustek MDC 830Z, HP R817, and more (including some Vivtar models in the second page like the Vivitar Vivicam 6300).

It was a nice surprise to find out that I can find models that fit these categories well for much less than my $1500+ budget I gave it, especially with cameras from well known manufacturers like Vivitar (and my Sister's, Hair Stylist's Son is a pretty good photographer, or so I'm told, so he should know about those things)

What do you guys think? Is the Vivitar the best camera for "Complete Control instead of Point and Shoot" for "Taking Pictures of Action Scenes", or would it be better to go with one of the higher rated HP or Mustek models instead?

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Old Oct 26, 2006, 4:17 PM   #5
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Ben, you're a tough kid to figure out. You've been preaching high ISO performance being the end-all, be-all and now you want to buy one of the worst performing high ISO cameras out there?

I'm gonna go out on a limb here. Whatever you end up buying you're not going to be happy with it. You're a little inconsistant and a self proclaimed 'pixel peeper' who looks at every photo at 100% magnification. My honest advice - and I'm serious here, not joking - buy the cheapest setup out there. Because you're going to regret whatever purchase you make and want to buy something else inside of 6 months because it's the 'latest and greatest'. Normally I would suggest to most people making the move up to DSLR for general photography they would be happy with any of the entry level DSLRs. But, based on your history of bouncing all over the place, and your desire to research and overanalyze rather than take photos I think you're gonna be dissatisfied with whataver you get.


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Old Oct 26, 2006, 10:14 PM   #6
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Ben:

What do you like to take photos of, and where did you find limitations with your Sony?

Almost any camera can take good photos in most conditions, and your skill is usually just as important as the equipment you're using.

But, in more extreme conditions, some models are better suited compared to others, and can make getting good photos easier and increase your percentage of keepers.

Most of the Oly owners like their cameras.

But, their entry level models tend to lag behind some of the other DSLR models in a number of categories. For example: noise levels (and/or smoothing of detail from noise reduction at higher ISO speeds in this model's case), AF speed/usability in lower light, focus points, buffer size/speed to media, viewfinder size.

On the other hand, because it's sensor is smaller compared to the ones you'll find in other manufacturer's DSLR models, you also have more depth of field for a given aperture for any given subject framing. So, that can make it easier for the transition from a P&S model, since your focus won't be as critical with the greater depth of field you'd have.

That's great if you want more depth of field. But, it can be a drawback if you want less to help your subject stand out from distracting backgrounds. It's still going to be very shallow compared to a camera like your Sony.

Another thing to consider is availability of lenses on the used market. Because the 4/3's system is relatively new in comparison to lens mount systems from other manufacturers, if you want AF lenses, you won't be able to find the bargains that you can with other brands.

For example, you can buy a relatively bright 50mm f/1.8 lens for Nikon or Canon models for around $100 brand new, or less used.

But, with an Olympus DSLR, you don't have as many choices in brighter lenses that would give you the same angle of view, unless you want to use an adapter with an older Manual Focus lens (and with the smaller viewfinder, that could be pretty tough to use).

Even then, because you'd have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnification), you'd need to find a wider lens to accomplish the same thing (and wider primes can get pretty pricey if you want brighter ones).

To put that into perspective, I bought a working Maxxum 7000 35mm SLR including a Minolta 50mm f/1.7 Autofocus Lens and a Minolta 1800AF flash for a "buy it now" price of only $49 on EBay. Try buying a used Autofocus Prime for an Olympus DSLR for that price, camera included or not. ;-) Ok -- that was a good deal. But, there are many good deals around if you're a patient shopper for the more popular camera mounts.

So, make sure to take lens offerings into consideration. Now, Sigma is planning to ship a number of their lenses in 4/3's mount, and the Olympus 4/3's lineup is looking better all the time. But, you still won't have the vast number of lenses available in the market (both new and used) that you do for other brands, because it's a much newer system.


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Old Oct 26, 2006, 10:27 PM   #7
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Jim's on the right track....pick your lens system 1st & the camera body 2nd (you'll go through bodies much faster than lenses).
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Old Oct 27, 2006, 6:50 AM   #8
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Quote:
Sorry rjseeney, I am no residential expert at all! I am just feeling real bored having just sold off my N1 for U.S. $300+ to my dad. I am feeling pretty uncomfortable walking into a camera store to buy my next camera now, I just don't have the assurance that I'm doing the right thing - to part with $900 (a great sum for me)on some camera...
I just find it ironic that someone who has been as vocal as you in doling out DSLR advice to other forum members about which cameras are best for their needs, can't decide which camera is best for himself.
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Old Oct 27, 2006, 8:42 AM   #9
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I'll take JimC's advice in mind. JimC, thanks for that great advice of yours.

I actually simply played around with that "my camera adviser" thing; I actually got various results when I played around with it a few times. As a result, I don't think thatthe Olympus EvoltE-500 can actually be considered to be the ultimate contender.

I actually desire high quality lenses though, and that Olympus Zuiko digital 14-54 mm F/2.8 - F/3.5 zoomlooks to be the one that can match the Sony DSC-R1's lens in quality.

The overall package of the Olympus E-500 also doesn't look that bad as some of you might be thinking in here. I think it is theonly dSLR that I can get with a lens like the R1's...in quality. Ofcouse there are super expensive L glasses and Nikkor's out there, but those alone can cost more than this two combinations.

It is true that the Zuiko digital 14-54 mm F/2.8 - F/3.5 zoomis one of the main factor(s) thatalso drawsme to wards the Olympus E-500 dSLR.

On the other hand, the Olympus EVOLT E-500 dSLR is also looking very complete and independent to me. This lens+bodycombination looks to be a very handy photographic tool to me. But sadly to say, it probably exceeds my budget by a tiny bit. (Which can be a matter of life and death - getting it or not getting it at all)

My other alternative will surely be the great Sony DSC-R1, it's lens and image sensor combination is a little bit more powerful than the E-500 + 14 - 54mm lens. The reach of the R1's lens is still a bit wider at the wide end, and longer at the long end than the E-500 + 14 - 54mm lens. If I bring into consideration the larger APS-C size image sensor of the R1, I can see that the lens of the R1 must be very great indeed to achieve all that edge.

The pixel pitch of the R1's 10 MPAPS-C CMOS and the 8 MP 4/3 CCD of the E-500 dSLR must be the same; considering that the R1's CMOS is slightly bigger with slightly more pixels and the E-500's slightly smaller with slightly less pixels.

I read that a bigger image sensor size will always be better for a given print size, since the pixels need to be enlarged less thanon a smaller image sensor.

So if you want to print a given size with both sensors, the R1's APS-C10 MP CMOS will not need to be enlarged so much compared to the 8 MP 4/3 CCD of the E-500. As a result, noise levels will be less magnified on the R1's print.

Also keep in mind that the pixel pitch of the R1's 10 MP APS-C CMOS will be about the same as that of the 8 MP 4/3 CCD of the E-500.

I learned all this from the very useful and informative link below>>>

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...ensor-size.htm

Also read the link below because it tells you about the diffraction limit(s) on various image sensor sizes with a given amount of mega-pixels>>>

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...hotography.htm

This is also to inform you that moremega-pixels does not necessarily determine more resolution.






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Old Oct 27, 2006, 9:34 AM   #10
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BenjaminXYZ wrote:
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I just don't have the assurance that I'm doing the right thing - to part with $900 (a great sum for me)on some camera...
Benjamin, if your budget is limited, I would strongly disadvise you to go with Olympus.

They're great cameras, but they're going to cost you.

As a beginner I think you'd be better off with Nikon, Canon or Pentax. All of these 3 manufacturers have bargains for lenses on ebay and other places. Don't underestimate this.

Once you have your camera, you'll soon notice that you want more than 1 lens. And if your wallet is a little thin (like mine), that might become a problem with Olympus.

Since I've noticed you're pretty particular about quality, maybe Nikon or Canon is the right choice for you, depending whether you like a firm grip or compactness.
A few weeks ago you liked the D70s a lot. Well, then if I were you, I'd get the D50 now and buy a nice lens with it, I've used both side to side, and except for a more expensive feel with the D70s, I didn't see or find much difference...

Also be prepared to make some bad purchases in lenses as you get along. That just happens...what you do is sell them again and try another one

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