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Old Nov 3, 2006, 9:01 PM   #11
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That sounds like the right camera choice for what you want to do. Your best lens choice might depend on the type of sports or the conditions. If you are planning any indoor sports you might need a fast prime lens like the 50 f/1.8 or the 85 f1.8.

http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/150/cat/10
http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/154/cat/10

For some outdoor sports, the 70-200 f4 you are looking at might do, but in some cases you might wish you had a brighter f2.8 zoom instead. And for some sports you might want more than 200mm. But to have both both 300mm and f2.8 gets very expensive, so it's usually a trade off depending on what you're shooting.

Look for posts from JohnG here on sports shooting.

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Old Nov 3, 2006, 10:03 PM   #12
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I'm shooting mostly outdoor motorsports (Enduro/Motocross/Supermoto/Rally's).

I also like to shoot wildlife and nightlife/party/long exposure night shots.
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Old Nov 3, 2006, 10:24 PM   #13
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Outdoor motorsports and wildlife: my suggestion would be the Canon 100-400L - it's not the perfect wildlife lens nor the perfect sports lens but it is very good at wildlife and pretty good for motorsports type work (where it isn't so critical to have 2.8 apertures).

If you need a cheap solution to get started with, the Sigma 70-300 lens is pretty decent and only $200. So, FOR THE PRICE, it's a good buy. But it's gonna be short for what you want to shoot and the auto-focus won't be that fast. But what do you want for $200?

Next up the food chain is the Canon 70-300 ($400 or $500 I think) - you get IS, better focus performance and very good image quality.

Next up the list - Sigma 100-300 f4 ($1000). By all accounts it has fabulous IQ, excellent focus speed - a very nice performer. But, you'll likely want to pair it with a 1.4x TC for wildlife and motorsports work.

Canon 400mm 5.6 prime - good for both wildlife and some motorsports but you're limited by it being a prime. Most birders prefer this over the 100-400 for flight shots - but the 100-400 is more flexible which I think will be beneficial for your motorsports work.

Sigma 50-500 (Bigma) - ($900). Has a pretty big following. Arguably (and there are a lot of arguments about this) not as good as the Canon 100-400 but still very popular. But, it's a very heavy lens - monopod or tripod is recommended.

There are some other lenses (I think Tamron has a new 200-500) but IMO they don't have a proven real-world track record yet. I prefer to base recommendations on photo evidence not on reviews, spec sheets or mtf charts. Until I see bodies of work with a lens, I wouldn't recommend it to someone.

After that it gets really pricey.



For long exposure night shots - it's not the lens that matters, you want a good, sturdy tripod (and by that I mean plan on spending $150-200 for starters ifyou want sturdy).

For nightlife - you probably want a fast prime lens. 50mm 1.8 is inexpensive but may be too tight. A 2.8 lens is probably not fast enough otherwise the 17-55 2.8 would be ideal. Maybe a 28mm or 35mm prime would be the best bet. I don't shoot primes that small - but I'm sure others here can recommend a solution.



As you can see, there is no single lens solution. So, you'll likely have to prioritize your needs and make some trade-offs. But that's all part of the game - most of us don't have the $$$ to buy everything at once. Best of luck!
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Old Nov 3, 2006, 11:05 PM   #14
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JohnG wrote:
Quote:
Outdoor motorsports and wildlife: my suggestion would be the Canon 100-400L - it's not the perfect wildlife lens nor the perfect sports lens but it is very good at wildlife and pretty good for motorsports type work (where it isn't so critical to have 2.8 apertures).

If you need a cheap solution to get started with, the Sigma 70-300 lens is pretty decent and only $200. So, FOR THE PRICE, it's a good buy. But it's gonna be short for what you want to shoot and the auto-focus won't be that fast. But what do you want for $200?

Next up the food chain is the Canon 70-300 ($400 or $500 I think) - you get IS, better focus performance and very good image quality.

Next up the list - Sigma 100-300 f4 ($1000). By all accounts it has fabulous IQ, excellent focus speed - a very nice performer. But, you'll likely want to pair it with a 1.4x TC for wildlife and motorsports work.

Canon 400mm 5.6 prime - good for both wildlife and some motorsports but you're limited by it being a prime. Most birders prefer this over the 100-400 for flight shots - but the 100-400 is more flexible which I think will be beneficial for your motorsports work.

Sigma 50-500 (Bigma) - ($900). Has a pretty big following. Arguably (and there are a lot of arguments about this) not as good as the Canon 100-400 but still very popular. But, it's a very heavy lens - monopod or tripod is recommended.

There are some other lenses (I think Tamron has a new 200-500) but IMO they don't have a proven real-world track record yet. I prefer to base recommendations on photo evidence not on reviews, spec sheets or mtf charts. Until I see bodies of work with a lens, I wouldn't recommend it to someone.

After that it gets really pricey.



For long exposure night shots - it's not the lens that matters, you want a good, sturdy tripod (and by that I mean plan on spending $150-200 for starters ifyou want sturdy).

For nightlife - you probably want a fast prime lens. 50mm 1.8 is inexpensive but may be too tight. A 2.8 lens is probably not fast enough otherwise the 17-55 2.8 would be ideal. Maybe a 28mm or 35mm prime would be the best bet. I don't shoot primes that small - but I'm sure others here can recommend a solution.



As you can see, there is no single lens solution. So, you'll likely have to prioritize your needs and make some trade-offs. But that's all part of the game - most of us don't have the $$$ to buy everything at once. Best of luck!
Thanks a lot for all the info!
I'll have the 18-55 I get with the kit and I want a second lens with very fast focus speed and very good image quality.
How come you didn't comment about the 70-200mm EF-L lens I was looking at? This lens is very fast and hight quality isn't it?

With 1110$ on the camera kit + 170$ for the battery grip i'll have about MAX 600$ for a lens for now.
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