Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 9, 2006, 1:26 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 448
Default

When it comes to video, the S3 is way superior over the H5. With its flip out display and pano assist the S3 is also a lot more versatile. The H5 should have a slight advantage in overall image quality of still pictures. Last but nor least the S3 uses cheap, standard SD memory cards, while the H5 uses expensive, propriatary memory sticks. For me the S3 is clearly the winner over the H5.
kassandro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 9, 2006, 1:53 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Sintares's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 647
Default

I have always preferred to judge cameras onimage quality and better ISO performance.

Also remember the Canon user has to buy the lens adapter and rechargable batteries and a charger, the Sony user does not.

That alone adds up to a couple of gigs of "expensive" memory sticks.

And its hardly likely you will be buying a new memory card each week, so a one of purchase of a more expensive card , figured out over the 3 or 4 year life of your camera hardly adds up to much.
Sintares is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 9, 2006, 2:31 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 822
Default

Also see Steve's review of the H2, just published today:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_reviews/h2.html


kenbalbari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 10, 2006, 1:18 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 260
Default

Canon makes the G7, and if you dont mind the 6x zoom, it should outperform the Sonys and the S3IS in speed, ISO ability, and picture quality. It's considered a pro-sumer camera. The reviews should be coming soon.
KALEL33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 10, 2006, 7:35 PM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 24
Default

I saw a review of the G7 (don't quite remember where) and it wasn't all that favorable.
JohnnyNewbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 10, 2006, 7:41 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,870
Default

http://reviews.cnet.com/Canon_PowerS...-32069604.html

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/ca...ew/index.shtml

the Hun

rinniethehun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 10, 2006, 10:39 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 260
Default

The reviews were very good when you don't compare it to the previous G-series cameras, but it does very good on it's own. If you haven't owned any other G-series camera then the changes would not bother you. I have a G2 and will not buy the new one because of what it's lost, but can it do better than the S3IS, H3, and H5.....I think yes, but is it a better camera than the G6, G5, etc.....not in my opinion.
KALEL33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 11, 2006, 11:38 AM   #18
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3
Default

There can be cases made for many cameras. I have been on a whirlwind of a search and the best advice I can give is to go to a shop that will allow you to take the camera for a test drive around a mall for a few minutes, take some pictures, play with the settings, test the sensitivity then take the camera back and have them print some of the photos for you ( you will probably have to pay for them ). What is the typical size you will have printed 5x7 or 8x10, I know few people that will print poster size both because its cost prohibitive and unrealistic. Will you be doing extreme cropping? Will you even be using custom settings? These can all be determining factors.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, see what output you like best. Unless you strictly look at pictures on a computer screen you would be hard pressed to judge what the actual photo quality is. Most people will have spent more on their cameras then their LCD monitors, which by the wayare still catching up toa high quality CRTthat has been calibrated. People like to fine tune their cameras yet fail to fine tune the device that the picture quality will be judged on. I think online reviews although great general guides are in essence the opinion of the reviewers, and reviews like those of CNET are entirely useless because we all know that advertising dollars count in that arena. Choosing a camera strictly on reviews can a disappointment.

I initially started looking for a new camera when my Sony DSCP200 went in for repair. I wanted something with a better lens for higher quality pictures, but I was also being budget conscious. I began looking with an open mind first at the Kodak P712, which was nice but in my opinion it wasn't enough of an enthusiast camera for me, though the prints looked pretty god. That lead me to look at the S3 and the H5, both were nice, both are mass marketed as enthusiast cameras. The Canon was good albeit I felt it was a little akward, and the prints weren'ttoo my liking. The Sony in my opinion wins hands down, although at least in my opinion, Sony cameras tend to produce overly sharpened images and a lot more jaggies for my taste (except for their DSLR models which are really Konica/Minolta guts). So the search went on and I next looked at theFujifilm S6000fd and s9100, both really nice cameras amazing output quality and low light sensitivity. I think I prefer the S6000fd over the H5because it produces nice prints right out of the camera I didn't feel I needed to fire up photoshop. I alsoliked the S9100 but since the price is appraoching entry level DSLR. So with that though I started looking at DSLR. I looked at the Olympus e500, Canon Rebel XT, Pentax K100d. Picture quality was pretty even except the Canon and Pentax started pulling away in quality outputat higher ISO's. I preferred the handling the best from the Olympus, it always seemed to be spot on exceptin low light. The Canon seemed a little outdated and the display was tiny, though the prints were excellent. The Pentax was nice but it has some weird problems with auto white balance, easily fixed with custom white balance. Not satisfied I found the perfect camera I started looking at the Pentax K10d, though thatone is not out yetand Canon 30D and the Nikon D80 and event he Nikon D200. I really had to stepback and stop myself because I was spiraling way out of my projected budget. You have to stop somewhere because there will always be something better, faster, newer, etc.

I had to be honest with myself, I don't work for National Geographic, nor will I be shooting action photos for Sports Illustrated. I will be taking general pictures and lots of pictures of family and friends around the holiday. I had already spent upward of $60+ for sample prints from the cameras even though the first couple were free. I have settled on the S6000fd or Pentax K100d. I'm still not sure which one I will chose but for my intended uses both produce excellent prints withoutpost processing. I will not be shooting in RAW all the time, nor will I have time at family funtions to make 10 adjustments for the perfect picture, thats not what I want to spend my day doing. When I have time to burn hiking or camping I can spend more time on testing compensation and manual adjustment or break out my Minolta Maxum 7SLR.

Just as a background I own an inherited Yashika TL Super from my dad, a Minolta ST SI, a Minolta Maxum 7, a Ricoh Kr5 SuperII (I took in trade for doing computer work for my friends parents), a Minolta S404 (which to date had taken some of the best digital photos I have ever taken), a Kodak LS753 thattakes vibrant smooth photos, and Sony DSCP200 which in my opinion is a toy. I consider myself an enthusiat, but not a pro, although I have been taking pictures all my life but on the serious side for about 17 years. I took photography all through through high school and some in college, so yes I have a great understanding of the subject but you always can leaarn something new.

The moral of the story is be honest with yourself and what your intended uses will be for your new digital camera. Get out there and test them and make some prints, its been well worth the money because my free time is invaluable and I don't want to spend anymore time looking. For me the Pentax k100d or the Fuji S6000fd will fit my needs, budget and allow room for growth. I can equate this to seeing people buying skis well above their ability level, many of which will never use them for what they were intended for. Of the matter of skiing and ski equipment I do consider myself an expert but thats another story. By the time I learn all of the fucntions on an expensive DSLR (Regular SLR's are much easier) there will something newer and cheaper with beter quality. The search will never end because its always onward and upward.


Someone told me once that "You don't need a Ferrari in New York City." I think that statement really hits home. I know this is long winded but hopefully this helps put things in perspective, take it for what its worth.

Regards and best of luck on your camera search.












speaktome62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 11, 2006, 4:15 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 7
Default

Dear Speaktome 62,

Thanks an awful lot for your advice.


Jacob James is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 11, 2006, 11:46 PM   #20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3
Default

Yeah its long winded, but thats a portion of what I've been going through to find the perfect camera.
speaktome62 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:25 AM.