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Old Nov 8, 2006, 7:50 PM   #1
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Hi my name is SAM and i am sick of the image quality of my point and shoot camera. There fore i have came to the conclusion of getting a dSLR. Which camera should i get (it can be an old model) also is the Canon 300d a good choice (not the 350d)
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Old Nov 8, 2006, 8:25 PM   #2
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Don't assume that because you buy a new camera, your images will magically be great. ;-)

The photographer's skill is more important than the equipment in many conditions.

What are you shooting with now? Where are you seeing limitations with your existing camera? What conditions are you finding them in?

When moving to a DSLR, you also have to take lens selection into consideration, and brighter lenses are typically larger, heavier and more expensive, depending on your expectations of quality and viewing/print sizes needed. So, you'll need to budget for more than just a camera body if shooting in more extreme conditions and expect to print at larger sizes.

What kind of budget do you have?

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Old Nov 8, 2006, 8:41 PM   #3
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well to start i want to shoot fast action, also my budget is very low for slrs but i can save up! Secondly i usually will be shooting in te day time
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Old Nov 8, 2006, 8:48 PM   #4
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What is very low?

What kind of fast action? You'll need to decide what focal lengths (how much zoom) you need in lenses. If you intend on taking photos of sports in a stadium, you'll probably want a longer zoom lens (i.e, 70-300mm range).

Sometimes used is a good idea, sometimes not.

As fast as DSLR prices are dropping lately, I've seen new models selling for less than their replacements on the used market from time to time. lol

For fast action, speed of operation typically improves with each generation of camera in the entry level lineup (with improvements in areas like write speed to memory cards after a camera's internal buffer fills up).

So, an older model like the original Rebel may not be a great option for you if you want to shoot more action type events.

Newer cameras will have larger buffers (more photos in a row written to fast internal memory before the camera slows down), faster write speeds to memory cards (so after the buffer fills up, it won't slow down the camera as much and/or you won't need to wait as long before taking another burst of photos).

Autofocus speed/reliability tends to improve with newer models, too.

Also, if you are going to need to "save up" for a new camera, you may find that even newer models are out by then (with current models more available on the used market as users look to upgrade).



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Old Nov 8, 2006, 8:54 PM   #5
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wow u really know ur stuff thx for the help just so u know i will be taking skateboarding pics, i will not need much zoom at all my budget is probably around 600 but like i said i can save up
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Old Nov 8, 2006, 9:40 PM   #6
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You can pick up just about any of the entry level DSLR models for $600 now.

The Nikon D50 probably has the fastest Autofocus between the more popular models, based on tests I've seen (especially as light gets a bit low). Lenses can make a difference. But, with a $600 budget, you won't have any of room to spare for faster lenses.

One good way to buy one would be a factory reconditioned model. CametaAuctions (a reputable Ebay vendor) sells a D50 kit for $529 right now including an 18-55mm lens.

They sell both new and factory reconditioned Nikon cameras and lenses.

I've seen a number of satisified users report buying these from them. Most have very low shutter actuations and arrive in perfect shape.

They have a 90 Day Factory Warranty from Nikon USA. But, Cameta covers them for a full year (and since they're not grey market, Nikon will repair them for a fee after the warranty expires).

They also sell them new versus factory reconditioned (look for NEW in their descriptions). The same kits in new condition will run you a bit over $100 more with the same memory card size included (or no memory card included).

If you're on a tight budget, they offer a factory reconditioned D50 kit with just the Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 AF lens for about $529.(or more with bundled memory cards of various sizes). Here's an example:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=160048021652

But, make darn sure you're buying from a reputable vendor. Most of the vendors selling at lower prices are either scam artists (i.e., you can't really buy a camera for the adveritised price and get what's supposed to be included without overpriced accessories, high shipping/insurance charges, etc.), and/or they're selling grey market gear (not intended for sale in the U.S.).

Nikon USA will refuse to service a camera tha was not intended for sale in the U.S., even if you are willing to pay them for the service (and vendors often list them with misleading text like "1 year U.S. Warranty" that may be a store warranty that's not worth the paper it's written on versus a genuine Nikon USA Warranty).

There are many other choices in cameras, too.

If it were me, in a new camera, I'd consider grabbing a Konica Minolta 5D, including an 18-70mm lens for $569 from Adorama.com. Konica Minolta exited the camera business earlier this year, and most vendors were sold out of these cameras months ago. Apparently, Adorama found a stash of them somewhere, since this came to my attention earlier today:

http://www.adorama.com/IMN5DK.html?s...&item_no=4

But, I'm biased (since I shoot with a KM 5D). :-)

That would get you a little longer lens than the standard kit lenses that come with the Canon and Nikon models (most are in the 18-55mm range, and the Nikkor 18-70mm would cost you more). I'm assuming that you'll be pretty close for skateboard type photos. But, even a 70mm lens may leave a bit to be desired. There are many choices in lenses on the used market, too.

The KM 5D's Autofocus performance isn't too shabby either (although it's probably not going to be as fast as a higher end lens from Canon or Nikon with built in Ultrasonic type focusing, it's got a decent focus motor in the body and good AF algorithms).

Acording to tests performed by PopPhoto, the Konica Minolta 5D's Autofocus system was able to focus faster (and in some cases, lower light, since it focuses in EV -1 light), compared to the other entry level DSLR models they tested a while back (comparing the Konica Minolta 5D, Canon Rebel XT, Olympus Evolt E-500 and Nikon D50).

They said this about it:

"The 9-zone AF system is the fastest of this group and works down to EV -1, very dim light indeed"

http://www.popphoto.com/cameras/1924...out-page3.html

I can vouch for the low light part. It can lock focus in extremely low light with a half way decent lens on it. No Autofocus Assist light needed in most any lighting you'd need to shoot in (although you can use the camera's built in flash for AF assist if you wanted to, I turned that feature off in mine and I've never needed to use it).


This model has a relatively small buffer (around 5 or 6 frames shooting JPEG Extra Fine). But, if you're shooting JPEG Fine, it's got fast enough write speeds to media that you can shoot at close to 3 frames per second until the memory card fills up with a faster card (Sandisk Ultra II, Extreme III or similar).

The KM 5D can write to a fast memory card at approximately 9 MB/Second (faster than any of the other entry level DSLR models, or most other models anywhere near it's price, except for the new Sony DSLR-A100 which is faster). It can even do 1 frame/second until a fast card fills up shooting in raw. That's very fast speed to a memory card.

Nikon offers an 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 lens that's a higher quality lens compared to the Konica Minolta 18-70mm kit lens. But, the Nikkor lens alone is going to set you back at least $200 for a reconditioned one (more for a new one). So, that would put you over budget.

But, just about any DSLR is going to be an improvement over most P&S models from a performance perspective if you need better Autofocus, etc.

For used gear, my favorite vendors are http://www.keh.com and http://www.bhphotovideo.com


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Old Nov 9, 2006, 9:18 AM   #7
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thank you so much for all the advice. now i will look at the nikon d50 and the other ones out there and when i get the camera i will show you some pictres
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