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Old Nov 14, 2006, 3:41 AM   #11
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BillDrew wrote:
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Just about any camera can be used to stitch panoramas - though it can be *much* easier if you have a way to keep the exposure and white balance the same for every "frame".
Bill,
the non-DSLR Canon cameras have a stich assistent builtin. This assistent shows the previously taken picture to achieve good overlap with the next picture. Hence You no more need a tripod. I really loved the Pano assist from my old Powershot S1IS. Actually, besides the excellent movie mode, this was one key reason to buy a Canon A710IS. Having said that you should use the free Autostich instead of Canons own Photostich program, because it is much better.
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 7:53 AM   #12
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I have an oldCasio with "stitch assist" - never used it except to set the exposure. Had to use the LCD as a viewfinder ( lots of fun in bright light) and it wanted about a 30% overlap (more than really needed). Plus the software was no where near the best.

The advantage of a "stitch assist" is that exposure and white balance should be set on the basis of the first photo and held constant for the rest of them. If you have manual exposure control and know how to use it, there is no advantage to having "stitch assist".

The need for a tripod when shooting panos depends mostlyon the distance to the subject. And a bit on the subject matter - strong horizontal features near the top or bottom (buildings) can cause problems. But unless you are shooting the interior of automobiles,it isn't real critical torotate exactly about the nodal point

Of course a tripod is real good idea for many photos, panoramic or not.
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 11:42 PM   #13
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Since I will be using the camera to travel, and based on my experience (with film SLR wide ange-telezoom lens), I was thinking that I'd use the panorama on landscapes, landmark sites, and also for some interiors. I'm headed to Egypt and am thinking that there might be some interiors of the huge landmarks, plus some exterior shots that would do well with a wide angle. But, if I don't have a wide angle that the panorama stitch might do the trick.

What do y'all think?
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 11:47 PM   #14
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Get the Canon if you want the panorama.
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 6:18 AM   #15
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poppop wrote:
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...I was thinking that I'd use the panorama on landscapes, landmark sites, and also for some interiors. I'm headed to Egypt and am thinking that there might be some interiors of the huge landmarks, plus some exterior shots that would do well with a wide angle. But, if I don't have a wide angle that the panorama stitch might do the trick. ...
Stitching will not substitute for a wide angle lens in all situations - moving and/or very close subjectsare oftenproblem areaswhen stitching. Get some practice before going on the trip. Otherwise, using up your memory for shots thatturn out to be unstitchable will get frustrating.

If you are used to using manual setting on a camera, ignore any panorama features the camera might have.
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Old Nov 17, 2006, 10:45 PM   #16
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Thanks everyone for your advice and suggestions. It's been very helpful!

Haven't made the purchase yet, but am leaning toward the Canon A710.
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Old Nov 18, 2006, 7:59 PM   #17
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Another question. I am thinking that I really want the wide angle (I've been shopping, touching, seeing) and the long zoom. If I were to go for the A710 (or the G7, if I dig into my savings acct) as my main point and shoot, what little compact (wouldn't have to be a new model) might be a good companion to slip in my pocket and give me the 28mm view ?

Alternatively, if I change my direction and go for a little bit bigger fixed lens digital what are the recommendations? What I see as options are the Fuji S6000fd or S9000. Any feedback on these or other brands?
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Old Nov 18, 2006, 9:40 PM   #18
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I bought a Fuji S9100 about 10 days ago. It goes from 28mm to 300mm telephoto. I bought a step down ring (58mm to 55mm) and attached a wide angle adapter from Olympus (.8 multiplier) which gives a maximum wide angle equivalent of a 22mm lens. However, it really only goes to about 24mm and then there's vignetting. Anyway, it's a great setup.I think you can do the same with the S6000fd. That camera, because of a new sensor withfewer megapixels thanthe S9100, might be better in low light situations. Also, for the next couple of months, there's a $50 rebate on the S6000fd, making it about $150 cheaper than the S9100.
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Old Nov 19, 2006, 12:57 AM   #19
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poppop wrote:
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Another question. I am thinking that I really want the wide angle (I've been shopping, touching, seeing) and the long zoom. If I were to go for the A710 (or the G7, if I dig into my savings acct) as my main point and shoot, what little compact (wouldn't have to be a new model) might be a good companion to slip in my pocket and give me the 28mm view ?

Alternatively, if I change my direction and go for a little bit bigger fixed lens digital what are the recommendations? What I see as options are the Fuji S6000fd or S9000. Any feedback on these or other brands?
You might consider getting the Canon SD800. It is an excellent little camera with a 28mm wide. It has optical image stabilization and an optical viewfinder in a camera small enough to carry in your pocket. It is a new model and not cheap though.
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Old Nov 20, 2006, 12:34 AM   #20
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The long zoom point and shoot cameras will be slower in focusing and from shot to shot usually.
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