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Old Nov 13, 2006, 1:06 PM   #11
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The KODAK P880 is good; why not?

Nice 24 mm wide angle that is the best among other digital cameras. A dSLR need to spend a lot to get a good quality zoom with 24 mm. (Especially one with F/2.8 at the 24 mm end)

Smoothwire focus ring and smooth manual zoom ring operation.

The camera also have a host of manual controls such as full manual mode, aperture priority mode, shutter priority mode, and program mode.

It is a great little pro-sumer camera.


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Old Nov 13, 2006, 1:17 PM   #12
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I'm a little concerned about the zoom. The Kodak EasyShare 6.1-Megapixel Zoom Digital Camera says 12x optical/4.2x digital/50x total zoom; precision-crafted Schneider-Kreuznach Variogon lens with optical image stabilization.



The 880 says this 5.8x optical/2x advanced digital/12x total zoom; precision-crafted Schneider-Kreuznach Variogon lens


Does the 880 have the optical image stabilization too. It didn't say.

I am so close to getting the 880 please tell me what to do.


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Old Nov 13, 2006, 1:23 PM   #13
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Personally, I won't care about how much zoom does a camera have. The law of Physics is always around; more zoom often degrades image quality. In another words, therearealways quality compromises as the zoom gets longer. IMO unless it is necessary, then I won't make the move.

IMO also, don't care about the 12x optical zoom version, it has a smaller 1/2.5" CCD to start with...I also believe that it's lens won't be so wide.

The P880 would be my choice anytime, and it is also the higher end model.




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Old Nov 13, 2006, 1:32 PM   #14
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Great. So I don't need to worrry about image stabilization with the 880?
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Old Nov 13, 2006, 1:42 PM   #15
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The Kodak Z612 have a build in optical image stabilization over the P880 I agree. However, the P880 have better things IMO such as a proper manual zoom ring, a proper focus by wire ring, RAW format, TIFF format, 24 mm wide angle compared to 35 mm normal angle, selectable auto focus points, 5cm macro focus range compared to 10 cm,7 position white balance setting compared to 5 position, 3 manual white balance option compared to none, 1/4000 secs fastest shutter compared to 1/2000 fastest shutter, selectable metering positions, a larger 1/1.8" CCD, and a lens thread for add on lenses.

KODAK P880 for me!

OH! The P880 have a hot-shoe for external flashes too.

The overall camera is heavier & more expensivethough...

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Old Nov 13, 2006, 2:03 PM   #16
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I just don't know which camera to get. Can someone decide for me please.
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Old Nov 13, 2006, 2:48 PM   #17
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Mary:

With the range of requirements you'v talked about in your other threads, from indoor family, portrait, to landscape, macro shots of nature and butterflys, and longer range telephoto shots, I think you might be better off with one of the superzooms like the Sony H2 or Fuji S5200.

The P880 is very nice for portaits, landscapes and indoor flash photography. It's not that good for indoor/low light without flash (ambient light), or for anything requiring longer telephoto (like most wildlife shots).

It's true that there are sacrifices in an all in one type zoom that tries to do everything. This is why some people buy DSLRs and go to the trouble to switch between half a dozen lenses depending on what they want to do.

With a DSLR you might want one wide to standard zoom for landscapes. architecture, and walk around use. A good low light normal prime for good portaits and low light non-flash indoor shots. A short telephot prime for macro shots (especially butterflies) and close portraits. A long telephoto zoom for birding. All of these can be expensive, so it's a good idea to know you really want or need.

For now, you would probably be best off with the all in one superzoom. With some experience, you will learn it's limits and have a better idea where you really want to spend for something better. Like what do you want to be able to do badly enough to want buy a $750 lens just to do it?

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Old Nov 13, 2006, 3:07 PM   #18
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I was all set to get the 880. I would like to take some pictures indoors with flash too. I would like to be able to zoom in on a bird flying in the air. So this one isn't good for that?
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Old Nov 13, 2006, 3:29 PM   #19
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i looked at the fuji and it was ok. The sony is too expensive.
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Old Nov 13, 2006, 3:47 PM   #20
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I thought the P880 was even a bit more expensive than the Sony H2. Another one you might look at is the newer Fuji S6000. It's more expensive at around $380, but there's a $50 rebate after which it ends up costing even a bit less than the P880.

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/fu...6000fd-review/


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