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Old Nov 13, 2006, 3:49 PM   #21
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If you're using a camera with a good flash indoors then she would not necessarily need a high ISO camera. The P880 would do fine for her indoors when using the flash.
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Old Nov 13, 2006, 4:50 PM   #22
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thank you. Do you mean using the flash in the camera? Or do I have to buy a flash?
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Old Nov 13, 2006, 5:22 PM   #23
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The P880 has a good flash on the camera.

And I disagree with whoever said it wasn't good for in the house. It's one of the best for in the house pics. Just not good for no-flash in the house. But it has a wider angle lens than most, and a good flash.

It also has a hot shoe where you can attach an external flash (which many other cameras in this range lack).

You can get even more professional looking portraits by using an external flash. Either by using an off camera flash, or by bouncing the flash off the ceiling or a wall, you get less direct, more natural light. It's also good for lighting larger rooms or for group shots.

So this is one of the best options if you want to learn to do professional looking portait photography. Kodaks own external flash is only about $100. And that would be able to communicate with the camera through the hot shoe and know how much light is needed for an exposure.

The biggest drawback is it's 140mm maximum telephoto. You might want more reach than that in some outdoor wildlife situations, especially shooting small birds. If that's not a big need, go ahead and get it. The 24mm wide angle on the P880 will be great though for indoors, and for landscape (or cityscape) type shots.

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Old Nov 13, 2006, 5:46 PM   #24
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why doesn't it have more of a zoom?
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Old Nov 13, 2006, 7:09 PM   #25
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Well, if you like the Kodak but want the longer telephoto zoom, there's the Z612 or the P712:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_.../z612_pg5.html
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_.../p712_pg5.html

The Z612 doesn't have the flash hot shoe, but it does seem like a better value. It should meet most of your needs.


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Old Nov 13, 2006, 8:20 PM   #26
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if you are a member of costco, you can get the P880 for $299. try it and if you don't like it, return it. p.s.--the current issue of "Consumer Reports" magazine says the P880 is a great way to get dSLR quality at a low price.

the prints look great. the wide angle lens is super and the zoom is more than enough for most situations. i think that you will like it. it has lots of scene modes and the auto mode works great. you can even set it up for manual operation, if you want to experiment.

as nike ads say...just do it!

best of luck to you and hope to see you posting P880 pictures soon....:|
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 4:41 AM   #27
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What does the 880 have that the z710 doesn't have?

Is Kodak the way to go?
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 5:44 AM   #28
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I have to get my camera through best buy to use my best buy card. They are sold out of the 880. I am wondering which would be better the



Kodak EasyShare 7.1-Megapixel Digital Camera - Silver


Model: Z710
or the



Kodak EasyShare 6.1-Megapixel Zoom Digital Camera


Model: Z612
The 6.1 says it has optical stabilization. I wonder if the 7.1 does. Which is the better camera? The 6.1 is more expensive.
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 10:11 AM   #29
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Mary,

Sorry if I've been abrupt. I realize this is a daunting decision for you.

Here is the challenge most of us have answering your questions: your needs are all over the board meaning that ANY non-slr camera is going to fall short of fulfilling all your needs - not the least of which is your desire to own an SLR camera.

You are further constrained by having limited funds and the constraint of needing to buy only from Best Buy (where you are going to overpay for your purchase).

Now, here's the thing with SLR cameras:

1. They're best suited to meet your long term needs as long as you are committed to buy more lenses and accessories down the road. You are NOT, repeat NOT, NOT, ,NOT going to spend just $700 and get fantastic shots in all the different areas you want to focus on.

2. A DSLR is not a magic box - it is very often more difficult to use than a digicam. The depth of field is narrower meaning you can get more out of focus shots until you become comfortable with how to focus with it. Low light shooting (without flash) and wildlife shooting is difficult - especially the wildlife shooting. It takes practice and the commitment to learn how to use the equipment. Don't expect to 'point and shoot' and be successful. It's not going to happen in these areas. You may think taking a photo of that bird or butterfly is easy - until you try it. Being successful will take work and knowledge of the equipment and how to use it - what focus mode to use, what shooting mode - how to get a good exposure (those skies can be brutal when trying to get a bird in flight). So, the bottom line here is - no matter what camera you get you won't be successful if you're not willing to learn.

Having said all this, the Olympus evolt is a very inexpensive camera as far as DSLRs go. The lenses you quoted will give you an effective 28-90mm lens and 80-300 lens (the olympus cameras have a 2x crop factor) which is decent. But you have to realize you're getting the cheapest DSLR out there - the Evolt isn't really in the same league as the Pentax, Nikon or Canon entry level DSLRs IMO. Also, there is less lens availability - although more manufacturers are starting to produce lenses in that format so it's growing.

So, bottom line. IF you're willing to spend more down the road to upgrade these lenses and IF you're willing to learn the principles of photography and the specifics of those principles as they apply to your varied and very different requirements (e.g. indoors, flash, butterflies, garden, birds) then this is probably a good route for you. If your not willing to do those two things you're just not going to be able to accomplish ALL your goals. And you're wasting money buying a DSLR.

Unfortunately given all your constraints there is no simple: 'buy this camera and it will solve all your problems' answer.

Hope that is somewhat helpful :G
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Old Nov 14, 2006, 10:39 AM   #30
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Thank you for your advice. I will think heavily about it.
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