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-   -   [Recovered Thread: 111589] (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/what-camera-should-i-buy/108926-recovered-thread-111589-a.html)

Skyzoo Dec 12, 2006 2:26 AM

Hey everyone, long time lurker, first time poster. I have been looking for a camera for a while. At first I was looking for a good superzoom camera, but I have been leaning to a DSLR.


There are three that are below $500 (that comes with a lens-$500 is my limit) and I am having a hard time decide which one.


1.) Nikon D50 w/ 18-80MM Lens-$499.99

2.) Pentax K110D w/ 18-55M M Lens-$469.99

3.) Samsung GX-1L w/ 18-55MM Lens-$469.95

4.) Olympus Evolt 500 w/ 14-45MM Lens-$479.99


The reson I list the Evolt last is because that is the lowest price I c ould find, but the website does not look at all reliable and I rather order something in confidence.


Well, I have a few questions:

A.) How good is that Nikkor lens? I have read that the particular lens, is not very sharp, and is outdated and not a good performer. Truth to this? Keep in mind that I am not a professional, or even seeking to build upon it, (future upgrades). I just want something good, quick responce, good performance, and good picture quality.

B.) How important is SR in the Pentax line? I rather save $100 and not get it. I am just a basic shooter; is it that neccessary?

C.) Which of the four is the best value for the money, (toughest question here haha)

D.) Which (if any ) of these cameras has a lens that comes with it that I can just pick up and use for any type of shot scenario that gives me good quality? I do not like the idea of having to purchase upgrades just to take a macro shot or a landscape shot, etc, etc. I just want something that can do it all. It doesn't need to be great.

Well, sorry for such a long thread, but these are the issues detturing me from even buying a DSLR.

Thank you for any advice that may be given.

-Skyzoo

mtclimber Dec 12, 2006 5:52 AM

Skyzoo-

Personally, unless you have a reliable dealer, that you can really trust,I would pass on all of them. If the product has the least problem at all, that is who you will have to turn to if you want it fixed.

MT/Sarah

Skyzoo Dec 12, 2006 2:08 PM

mtclimber wrote:
Quote:

Skyzoo-

Personally, unless you have a reliable dealer, that you can really trust,I would pass on all of them. If the product has the least problem at all, that is who you will have to turn to if you want it fixed.

MT/Sarah
The Nikon, Pentax, and Samsung are from reliable sites that I have known for years. The host site to the Olympus, is not.


Can anyone else help answer my questions? I know it is a long thread, but any help is appreciated. And thank you MT. :)


mtngal Dec 12, 2006 2:38 PM

I can only address a couple of your questions, and sometimes the answers to your others would be "it depends."

I'm own Pentax cameras, and am naturally partial to something that has given me a great deal of pleasure for almost a year (bought a DS in January last year). I haven't used the Nikon lenses, so can't address that (thought the Nikon was too big/clunky for my small hands, so haven't used one).

The Pentax kit lens is pretty good (one of the better rated kit lenses), inexpensive and certainly well worth the little they charge for it. I still have the one I got with the DS and more or less keep it on one of the camera bodies when I'm carrying two cameras.

SR may or may not be important to someone. I've taken many wonderful pictures with the DS, which doesn't have it, but there is a limit to how slow a shutter speed I can use while handholding a camera, and I would sometimes get camera shake at 200mm and reasonable shutter speeds - I'm not as steady as I was 20 years ago. So if you are a steady photographer, and won't be using really long lenses, then SR might not be a big thing for you. However, I got frustrated with my own limitations, bought a K100 and am SO happy I did! To me it's well worth the extra cost and I love the 300mm lens I bought to use with it. So the answer to whether SR is worth the extra money depends on you personally.

There is no lens that "does it all" no matter which camera system you buy - that's the nature of photography. The kit lenses will be fine for landscape and most general snaps, but won't close focus like a dedicated macro lens will. If you want to take pictures of bugs you'll need something else.

Since the Samsung (same as the Pentax DL) and the Pentax K110 are the same price, I'd opt for the K110. It's a newer camera and handles jpg files better than the DL - the main difference between the two cameras (there are some others, but that's the one I think would mean the most). They have the same sensor and same lens (or so I assume, don't know that for a fact) and so most things will be the same.

Since all of these cameras will take excellent pictures, I'd go to a camera store and play with all of them. When I first was in the market for a dSLR, I had a definite preference for which felt better in my hands. That's the camera you should buy - the best camera in the world won't take good pictures if it is in your closet at home because you hate carrying/using it.

Skyzoo Dec 12, 2006 2:45 PM

mtngal wrote:
Quote:

I can only address a couple of your questions, and sometimes the answers to your others would be "it depends."

I'm own Pentax cameras, and am naturally partial to something that has given me a great deal of pleasure for almost a year (bought a DS in January last year). I haven't used the Nikon lenses, so can't address that (thought the Nikon was too big/clunky for my small hands, so haven't used one).

The Pentax kit lens is pretty good (one of the better rated kit lenses), inexpensive and certainly well worth the little they charge for it. I still have the one I got with the DS and more or less keep it on one of the camera bodies when I'm carrying two cameras.

SR may or may not be important to someone. I've taken many wonderful pictures with the DS, which doesn't have it, but there is a limit to how slow a shutter speed I can use while handholding a camera, and I would sometimes get camera shake at 200mm and reasonable shutter speeds - I'm not as steady as I was 20 years ago. So if you are a steady photographer, and won't be using really long lenses, then SR might not be a big thing for you. However, I got frustrated with my own limitations, bought a K100 and am SO happy I did! To me it's well worth the extra cost and I love the 300mm lens I bought to use with it. So the answer to whether SR is worth the extra money depends on you personally.

There is no lens that "does it all" no matter which camera system you buy - that's the nature of photography. The kit lenses will be fine for landscape and most general snaps, but won't close focus like a dedicated macro lens will. If you want to take pictures of bugs you'll need something else.

Since the Samsung (same as the Pentax DL) and the Pentax K110 are the same price, I'd opt for the K110. It's a newer camera and handles jpg files better than the DL - the main difference between the two cameras (there are some others, but that's the one I think would mean the most). They have the same sensor and same lens (or so I assume, don't know that for a fact) and so most things will be the same.

Since all of these cameras will take excellent pictures, I'd go to a camera store and play with all of them. When I first was in the market for a dSLR, I had a definite preference for which felt better in my hands. That's the camera you should buy - the best camera in the world won't take good pictures if it is in your closet at home because you hate carrying/using it.
Thank you for taking the time to reply bra. I have already gotten my hands on a D50, Evolt, and the Rebel; I guess I just have a few more to go.


Thank you for the advice. I will probably end up choosing the Pentax (I was leaning to it anyways). Hopefully I can still take some decent macro shots with out having to pay 469486958769567 dollars for a lens to do it. :s



JohnG Dec 12, 2006 2:55 PM

Skyzoo,

I have to ask what I think is an important question: why are you leaning towards a DSLR over a digicam? What types of photography are you wanting to do?

This is an important question. It is very likely that 1 of 2 things will occur:

1. You will be able to achieve your goals with a digicam

2. You will NOT be able to achieve your goals with a DSLR, spending only $500

The combination of wanting a 'single, do it all' lens that takes great photos in any situation and DSLR just don't go together. Add in the $500 price limit and I think you'll end up with a solution that is more restrictive than what a digicam offers for the same price.

So, please answer these questions:

1. What types of photography are you planning on doing?

2. Why is it you are leaning towards a DSLR?

rfortson Dec 12, 2006 4:13 PM

Skyzoo wrote:
Quote:

Hopefully I can still take some decent macro shots with out having to pay 469486958769567 dollars for a lens to do it. :s


One of the good things about Pentax (and Samsung) is that you can use basically any Pentax K-mountlens made in the last 30 years on the camera. That means you can find some good used lenses at very nice prices. If you're looking for a macro lens, check ebay, keh.com, B&H used section and other places. I've managed to find some nice fun lenses for very reasonable prices. (I own the K100D.)

Russ

Skyzoo Dec 13, 2006 2:18 AM

JohnG wrote:
Quote:

Skyzoo,

I have to ask what I think is an important question: why are you leaning towards a DSLR over a digicam? What types of photography are you wanting to do?

This is an important question. It is very likely that 1 of 2 things will occur:

1. You will be able to achieve your goals with a digicam

2. You will NOT be able to achieve your goals with a DSLR, spending only $500

The combination of wanting a 'single, do it all' lens that takes great photos in any situation and DSLR just don't go together. Add in the $500 price limit and I think you'll end up with a solution that is more restrictive than what a digicam offers for the same price.

So, please answer these questions:




1. What types of photography are you planning on doing?

2. Why is it you are leaning towards a DSLR?
Sure, I can answer those. The first answer is: Just anything that pops in my way that I feel like taking. I go hiking? Oh-la-la, I like that mountain: snap! Man, my car looks nice today-snap! And so on...I just want a DSLR because of A) Something new I have never used. B) Very responsive and quick C) Excellent image quality D) Lets face it, fun to use.

And I suppsoe that second part of that answered question two. ;)

Regarding the "do it all" It doesn't need to be the atmost perfect quality. I assume many people here have high end to medium range equipment. You can easily dismiss something as "low grade" or not being good enough to your expectations, but coming from a person who is upgrading from a dinky powershot, everything will look better. If you had a 600 lens and looked at something for a 100, I am sure it be like crap to you; to me? I am sure it would kick ass.


So, in retrospect, I am not picky. :)



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