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Old Dec 16, 2006, 11:03 AM   #1
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hi

i have looked and searched a lot point and shoots and D-SLR's and i tried to find something in middle not to buy a SLR (even though i love the look and feel of them) unfortunately i could not find a camera with good low light capabilities, or let me say, anything that an SLR can gave to me. (since G7 turns out to be nothing compareable to a D-SLR) i have looked up canon A640 and Fuji F30 but canon seems to have bad low light capability and fujiseems not to fulfill my needs (macro, swivel screen, no viewfinder etc.)

so why am i so confusedgetting into SLR world ? because i really dont know this world very much and needen help from you

i am worried aboutusing only viewfinder. (i could not even give up swivel screen !) it bothersme because i think it will reduce my creativity. (taking picturesfrom inappropriate positions etc.) another thing is i dont really want to change lenses all the time. for example for limited times i want toshoot a wide angle and amacro picture with the same lens. is this possible? because it is written for the wide angle or telephoto lenses as mininum focus distance is at least 30cm.

so should i move to SLR or get a point and shoot (and stick with ISO 50) ?

thanks
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Old Dec 16, 2006, 12:03 PM   #2
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I understand your confusion.

Here's a new way of looking at it...

Most serious photographers own BOTH a DSLR and a point and shoot.

As for myself, I'm the lucky owner of a Canon 20D and a Canon S80.

So, go out and treat yourself and get one (preferabley the DSLR first) and then get yourself a point and shoot.

-- Terry
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Old Dec 16, 2006, 12:45 PM   #3
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thanks a lot for your reply Terry

but all i want is a single camera that i can take it to everywhere all the time. size is not important

i dont want to regret when i have one with me but needing the other

and also i cannot afford that much (perhaps i will go with D40 firstly than buy a nice lens if i can decide to get one)


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Old Dec 16, 2006, 1:12 PM   #4
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dont want to regret when i have one with me but needing the other
I think the point Terry was making was that you don't want to regret not having any camera with you at all. Which will likely happen often unless you want to project the geek image of always having a camera hanging around your neck.

If I could have only one camera it would fit in my pocket. I have several, but I get more shots with my pocket camera even though it is the least competent.

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Old Dec 16, 2006, 1:53 PM   #5
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...unless you want to project the geek image of always having a camera hanging around your neck
Awww... you just ruined my self respect, now that I know I'm projecting a "geek image". :-)

I sometimes remove it from around my neck when I sit down for dinner. Does that help my image any? lol

All kidding aside, I agree with slipe (about having a small camera, not the geek part). lol I keep a camera with me in a pants pocket at all times, ready to take a photo on a moments notice. Sometimes, you may not want to lug a larger camera around (even a larger non-DSLR model).

A smaller camera can be less intimating to others, too (and you'll draw less attention, since cameras that are too "professional looking" are discouraged at some venues).

IOW, don't choose -- get both types (if budget permits). Each has their strengths and weaknesses.


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Old Dec 16, 2006, 3:00 PM   #6
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Awww... you just ruined my self respect, now that I know I'm projecting a "geek image".
Poor choice of words. I guess I should have said "unless you want the hassle of always having a camera hanging around your neck all the time". It does sometimes say "tourist" or "interloper" though.

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Old Dec 16, 2006, 3:03 PM   #7
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tourists are using camera phones these days...
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Old Dec 16, 2006, 3:09 PM   #8
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so wearing a camera to dinner is bad ?

Riley
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Old Dec 16, 2006, 3:50 PM   #9
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I'd suggest to go "Terries" way, too. Why? Because you ask for certain features a dSLR these time won't give you - like a swiveling screen for example or the superb low light capabilities.

I was a all-manual analog user for many years, then we got our first (and only) analog SLR - what a step up! OK - it has 3x zoom, no display in the back and so on... Some years ago our first digicam: 10x zoom, selectable ISO, and lot's of bells and whistles.

What did we found? We use the video mode on very rare occasions. The zoom range is great, BUT if the camera can't get focus at the tele end it's not usable... and my Oly C770 eats rechargeables like a friend of mine ice-cream... you know what I mean

What I want to say is - you can't get everything, it's a mixed bag in every case.

- if it's only the low light - have a look at Fuji. F10 and others can deliver amazing pictures and have nice lenses (can ask here in forum for other opinions)
- macro... well if you go for small animals (like flying insects etc.) you want some distance which calls for zoom and DOF control --> that's SLR. If you just want to get "close" a high resolution digicam with low ISO setting and enough light will give good images and you can crop to get even "closer".
- speed: well - that's the bugger for me. AF speed, shot-to-shot speed, handling speed. If you have to click your way through 7+ menus and sub-menus to get the essential setting - you will most likely miss a lot of good pics. Also saving 8mp or more onto a card needs time! You need a buffer on your camera big enough to hold some pictures for a series etc...
- size, weight, "fun" factor. Now when you are on vacation and spoil your whole day carrying a HUGE bag with several lenses, a heavy SLR and setup the whole stuff here and there for the "perfect" picture all the while the family yells at you and furthermore YOU won't relax and "feel" and "live" that moment, but rather "work" here - what's the point? Get a pocketable point&shoot digicam with good stamina, some scene modes and good speed for these "hey - do you remember this here" pics.

MY personal problem is, that I haven't found that PS camera yet, the "just press the shutter" thingie with good stamina, fast lens, swivel screen and viewfinder and ... and... and... a sturdy no-nonsense no-frills high ISO workhorse to get 250 out of 500 keepers in my pocket... Maybe the camera industry will do me a favour and invent that one day

As for now the family decided for a dSLR. My, well - our *ist DL2 already arrived and I am allowed to play with it before it sits under the tree.

- handling, speed, ISO performance, stamina, settings from full AUTO over scene programs to fully manual: that's great!
- size+weight is (compared to a PS) not so good, along with some other aspects (like the CLICK sound which is not good in theatre and very quiet surroundings)

So I fully understand your confusion and would advise to look after a combo - I plan on going that route with my DL2 - get a ultra zoom and a fast lense (not more, am lazy) to replace the kit lense and WHEN our dream PS camera is in store - get one and live a happy family life with a understanding wife and daughter which allow time for me going on "photo-safari" and bringing back some stunning pics while they hang around lazy in town or at the beach etc. AND on the other hand have a light and speedy/snappy PS in my pocket for all day use.

Hope that helps in some way,
Th.
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Old Dec 16, 2006, 6:21 PM   #10
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Thank you all a lot

i think i will go with point and shoot first, perhaps A640.

when i stop taking too many video clips, when i hate the noisy-blurry pictures of sun-set and when i start to "think" and "compose" the pictures i am taking rather than "point" and "shoot", i will buy a D-SLR.
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