Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 24, 2006, 2:46 AM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 19
Default

Thanks, Ken -- where can I find information on the Sigma 70-200 2.8 mount for Pentax? The Sigma web site seems to indicate that neither of their 70-200 2.8 lenses has a Pentax mount unless I am mis-reading or mis-interpreting (very possible for a newbie like me!)...

Dave
davepw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2006, 12:52 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 822
Default

You're right, they haven't released the newest version of the 70-200 for Pentax. It only shows up in the discontinued lenses:
http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/lenses_chart2.asp

They show all three at sigma4less, the newest DG Macro APO version as "to be announced", the DG APO as "call for availabliility", and the EX IF APO version as "out of stock". So I don't know whether it's actually available.
http://www.sigma4less.com/shopdata/g...=SG70200F28DPX

If you opt for Nikon, you might want to consider the 85mm f1.8 and the 80-200 f2.8:

http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/100/cat/12
http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/124/cat/13


kenbalbari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2006, 3:15 PM   #13
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Dave,

Just thought I'd chime in on the sports front - I shoot all the sports you mentioned: baseball, basketball and volleyball.

I would suggest that since 2 of your sports are indoors, you stick with cameras that are good at high ISO. Unfortunately the Olympus is not. Both the Pentax 10d and Nikon D80 are pretty good at ISO 1600. For volleyball, something like an 85mm 1.8 lens is a very good lens to get. For basketball, a 50mm 1.8 and 85mm 1.8 lenses are the lenses of choice. Unfortunately a 2.8 zoom lens probably isn't going to get you great results indoors - you'd get MUCH better results with the primes.

As for baseball - 200mm is a bit short - even when shooting from the field. For instance if you're on the first base line (say 10 feet behind the bag) a 200mm lens is too short to reach 3rd base - 300mm is a stretch. So, for that sport, if you use a 70-200 2.8 you'll want a 1.4x TC to go with it.

As you've noticed however - your lens choice becomes a little more limited (with regards to AF lenses for sports shooting) when you go with Pentax. But everything is a trade-off. If you need in-body IS, then it's Pentax or Sony (and high end sony lenses are much more expensive than Nikon/Canon ).

But, I will provide one final word - especially with sports shooting, look for example photos from cameras/lenses being recommended. Sports shooting is demanding of equipment - especially in low light. So, seek out sample photos as your idea of 'good' and another person's may not be the same thing.

I shoot Canon so unfortunately my galleries won't be of much help in regards to you picking your specific equipment. But I will say, my advice on focal length for all 3 sports and apertures for the indoor sports will carry over into Pentax or Nikon as well (meaning you need faster than 2.8 for basketball and volleyball and you'll need longer than 200mm for baseball).

You're welcome to peruse my galleries:

www.jagsportsphotos.com

whatever you decide - I hope to see you posting in the sports forum soon. Best of luck!
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2006, 3:52 PM   #14
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 19
Default

kenbalbari wrote:
Quote:
You're right, they haven't released the newest version of the 70-200 for Pentax. It only shows up in the discontinued lenses:
http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/lenses_chart2.asp

They show all three at sigma4less, the newest DG Macro APO version as "to be announced", the DG APO as "call for availabliility", and the EX IF APO version as "out of stock". So I don't know whether it's actually available.
http://www.sigma4less.com/shopdata/g...=SG70200F28DPX

If you opt for Nikon, you might want to consider the 85mm f1.8 and the 80-200 f2.8:

http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/100/cat/12
http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...uct/124/cat/13

Thanks, Ken...I will need to see what sort of fast lenses I can assemble for the Pentax, based on all the feedback I am getting. This will help a lot!

Dave
davepw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2006, 4:20 PM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 19
Default

John, thank you for all the detail and pointer to the very cool gallery.

With all the excellent input I am getting from this forum, I need to reconsider my shortlist, which now reads as follows, in current order of preference:
Pentax K10D
Nikon D200
Canon 30D
Nikon D80

For the fast lenses I will need for sports shooting, I believe the Canon and Nikon will give more flexibility down the road. In addition, the faster burst modes and shutter speed of the 30D and D200 are appealing.

I would go for the Nikon or Canon path based on lens availability/performance and proven camera performance, if it were not for my being hung up on the camera based IS question. Dust removal may be more marketing than real benefit, but difficult to tell. I think the weather proofing + IS + dust removal + 10MP + cost cannot be ignored as positives for the Pentax K10D. I will look for a good thread that discusses the future of image stabilization -- lens based vs camera based...that to me is the most strategic question to answer since I get one chance to build my lens stable from scratch.
davepw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2006, 11:31 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

There are a number of choices for fast prime lenses when it comes to Pentax, though some of the choices might not be auto focus. There's a very well regarded Pentax 50mm 1.4 (currently being made but in high demand) as well as the older, no longer made 1.7, both havebeen made in a variety of configurations and manual focus versions of the lensare often for sale on ebay for quite a bit less than a newAF version. There's also a 77mm 1.8 that is a top-of-the-line lens - that'sone I would love to get some time.

It does take extra research to find what you want with the Pentax line, and could mean watching sales on ebay or wandering around pawn shops that sell photo equipment. There are still reasonably priced used lenses out there, but they are getting harder to find as more people discover the K10 and Pentax in general.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 25, 2006, 5:55 AM   #17
Super Moderator
 
peripatetic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,599
Default

For sports work your list is in the wrong order IMO, the correct order is:

1. Canon 30D
2. Nikon D200
3. Pentax K10D

Firstly for sports work IS is basically irrelevant.
Secondly, the longer the lens' focal length the better it is to have the IS in the lens rather than the body. That's the reason Canon and Nikon (who own 99.99999% of the sports market) do it that way.

If your primary interest was portrait and landscape, I'd put the Pentax back towards the top, but the buffer size, 5 fps, the AF speed and accuracy, the high-ISO performance, the available lenses all put Canon top for action work.

The Nikon is just as good, but more expensive at the same level of performance.

peripatetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2006, 1:00 AM   #18
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 19
Default

Thank you so much to everyone who has patiently and politely provided such useful information! I have done a lot of reading based on the input I received here, and now understand and agree that for my needs the Canon 30D and the Nikon D200 are likely the best fit. This based on shooting/focusing performance, image quality especially in low light situations, burst shooting capabilities, and lens availability. The Pentax K10D seems to be a fantastic camera, just not confident it is a good fit for my expected demanding needs for sports and astrophotography. I now better understand why camera-based IS will not do much for improved sports shooting.

I am specifically leaning towards the Canon 30D over the Nikon D200. Based on both professional reviews and end user feedback here and elsewhere, my interpretation of the key tradeoffs is as follows:

Canon 30D positives: modestly better image quality (great high ISO performance important for indoor sports and astrophotography), lower cost, better software package, ease of use for newbie

Nikon D200 positives: richer feature set and customization (but maybe too much for a newbie!), battery life, 10MP, several other things that are over my head,

I assume great Canon/Nikon lenses and 3rd party lenses are available for both, and at a very high cost in both cases, but I'm not sure if the difference is enough to sway my decision in either direction. I imagine I'd wind up with something like a 17-70 zoom, a 70-300 IS zoom, and a very fast 50mm prime, all at a cost of probably over $1000 for the lenses.

So bottom line, I am leaning modestly towards the Canon 30D based on fantastic focusing/shooting performance, image quality. ease-of-use, cost saving, and lens availability in that order. Does anyone see any holes in my reasoning?

Thanks again for all your help, and I hope everyone had a nice holiday today!
davepw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2006, 3:53 AM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 19
Default

Adding to my recent post, how is this for a tentative list of lenses to go with the Canon 30D for general purpose and sports action shooting?:
Canon 50mm 1.8 $ 75
Canon 85mm 1.8 $350
Sigma 17-70 2.8-4.5 $350
Sigma 70-200 f2.8n $800 or Canon EF 70-200 f4.0L USM $575

Any thoughts on how to get this lens budget closer to $1000 and still give me the versatility to shoot indoor volleyball/basketball, outdoor baseball/soccer, and use the 30D as an all around camera for portraits and travel, would be great!

I understand I need to compromise somewhere, so just trying to find the sweet spot.

Dave

davepw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2006, 8:22 AM   #20
Super Moderator
 
peripatetic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,599
Default

Dave,

That looks like a very nice setup.

As you are into astrophotography I assume you know about this software...

http://www.mlunsold.com/

Highly recommended.

Your point about the bundled software is a good one. If you want to shoot RAW, and for this type of camera IMO it's crazy not to, then the DPP software that comes free with the Canon is actually a very competent package. The Nikon software is not free.

My take is that the Canon gives you 95% of the quality of the Nikon at 75% of the price, and looking at sports work in particular maybe gives you equal or even very slightly better quality for the lower price.

You could save a few hundred by going for the kit lens instead of the 17-70, its deficiencies are greatly exagerated, you can always upgrade later to one of the 17-50 f2.8 lenses, and of course a 70-300 f4-5.6 would work fine for outdoor sports in decent light.


peripatetic is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:33 AM.