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Old Dec 25, 2006, 4:19 PM   #1
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Hi guys!

I wanna buy my first DSLR camera(has to be olympus)but cant decide which to buy. Ibelieve the realistic choices for my level of experience are the E 400, E 330 & the E500.

Please also recommend which will be a decent lens selection for me.

I currently have the Olympus IR300,olympus D380,Olympus IS 300.

Anysuggestions will be highly appreciated!



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Old Dec 26, 2006, 2:39 AM   #2
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The E-500 looks like the best value. Defeinately get the 2-lens kit if you get either the E-400 or E-500.

The E-400 isn't available in the US. It looks very interesting though if you are somewhere where you can get it, thought the price may be a bit high still as far as I can tell, as it just came out.

The E-330 may be worth the extra cost over the E-500 if you really want the tilting LCD and the live-view ability to compose shots on the LCD like on compact digicams. This can be especially useful if you do much macro photography--as one of the live view modes allows a 10X magnification for precise manual focusing.

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Old Dec 30, 2006, 2:58 PM   #3
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Hi there!

Thnx for tht peice...so i did purchase the Olympus E500 with the lens kit.

I needed a little low-down on the ISO settings.What isa low ISO setting used for?higher setting implies....?plzzz help..

Will you recommend any new lenses for me or should i first get used to the ones provided in the kit & then decide wht i need?

-jus strted widSLR
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Old Dec 30, 2006, 5:17 PM   #4
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I think you've made a fine choice for a first slr (and possibly all the camera you'll ever need). The best way to really learn things is to shoot. Set the camera to shoot with iso 100 (or whatever the lowest setting is) and take a shot, notch it up to 200, take the sameshot, then to 400, etc. then upload the images to your comp and look at he differences. Be sure to look at the shooting info as you examine them, shutter speed, aperature reading etc. In short, low numbered iso is for slow things and lots of light and high is for fast i.e., iso 80 for sunny day in June outside in the garden and iso 400 for moving subjects or for lower light. It's still a camera even though it's digital imaging instead of film which means it's all about light. Best advice is to check out some instructional materials online. There is loads of freely accessible stuff if you google around a little. Try the Olympus website, I'm not familiar with what they have but I know that Canon and Nikon both have some really nice instructional stuff. try other major manufactureres as well as they are all reputable companies and their info will be solid and useful. Also, check out the galleris of samples of dslr images at dpreview to see not only a variety of different subjects under different conditions but also all theshooting info of the shots as well as the full size image if you want to down load it. Good luck with your new obsession, take lots of pictures, don't ever get discouraged.Really good photos are as much the result of learning and practice as they are a matter of when you pull the trigger. Have fun!
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Old Dec 30, 2006, 6:09 PM   #5
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Congratulations.

There are folks in the Olypus forum who know alot more than I do, you might try a visit there:
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_forum.php?id=36

There's a good list of four-thirds lenses available here (and in general a good site for information about Olympus):
http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/oly-e/lenses.html

As well as the official site here:
http://four-thirds.org/en/products/lense.html

The kit lenses will likely cover most of your needs, covering the range from 28mm-300mm equivalent. There aren't *alot* of available lenses, maybe 6-7 inexpensive lenses for under $300 each and another 6-7 very good ones in about the $400-600 range. But some of the ones that are there do seem to be good value compared to the competition.

Until recently, the biggest lack was of affordable prime lenses, but there are a deccent selection now with the addition of a few, particulalry those from Sigma. A couple of these aren't available yet but coming in 2007 or have just become available and might be in short supply.

But you really don't need another lens right off, and should probably hold off on that until you have a need not being met by the kit lenses. Whether you need something else might depend on if there's a specific purpose you need to adress like a brighter lens for low light shooting, a longer telephoto for bird or wildlife, a good lens for macro shooting, an especially good portait lens, a good wide angle lens, a good all-in-one type travel lens, a lens especially good for sports, etc.

For upgrades to the kit lenses, the Zuiko 14-54 and 50-200 are really outstanding. But probably more than you really would need right now.

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Old Jan 1, 2007, 6:25 AM   #6
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Thanks a lot for the info!

Hope u have a splendid New Year!

Thnx agnnn..

_john
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