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Old Feb 19, 2007, 2:53 PM   #81
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kenbalbari wrote:
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http://www.beachcamera.com/shop/prod...GZ&tab=acc

That Pentax rebate deal is still on, btw. The rebate is $50 if you get it with the K100D/K110D. You can get the camera, the 18-55 kit lens, the 50-200 lens, and flash, and still be under $800 for the K100D after rebate. K110D is about $100 less. If you buy it all at once.
Thanks Ken.
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Old Feb 22, 2007, 11:42 PM   #82
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potter99 wrote:
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Additionally my daughter is very fair and she looks really washed out on a good number of the photos ... The indoor photos I have taken of her with the old 35mm Nikon are usually better than the Powershot andthe Nikononly has the fill flash and 35-80mm lens. They are sometimes a little dark.
Frankly, it sounds like the P/S is overexposing your daughter regularly, but getting the rest of the pic better-exposed, while the dSLR is getting your daughter right, at the cost of the rest of the scene.

This is a classic "issue" with on-camera flashes in general: as light-sources, their illumination falls off with distance. When the primary subject is close, they get the most light... but are prone to overexposure. When the ambient light is reasonably dark, however, properly-exposing the subject close to the flash means woefull underexposure for the REST of the scene.

More sophisticated flashes solve this problem with "lightboxes" and "bounce" and such -- creating more "ambient" light, overall.


- Steve S.

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Old Feb 23, 2007, 7:29 AM   #83
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Steve-S wrote:
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potter99 wrote:
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Additionally my daughter is very fair and she looks really washed out on a good number of the photos ... The indoor photos I have taken of her with the old 35mm Nikon are usually better than the Powershot andthe Nikononly has the fill flash and 35-80mm lens. They are sometimes a little dark.
Frankly, it sounds like the P/S is overexposing your daughter regularly, but getting the rest of the pic better-exposed, while the dSLR is getting your daughter right, at the cost of the rest of the scene.

This is a classic "issue" with on-camera flashes in general: as light-sources, their illumination falls off with distance. When the primary subject is close, they get the most light... but are prone to overexposure. When the ambient light is reasonably dark, however, properly-exposing the subject close to the flash means woefull underexposure for the REST of the scene.

More sophisticated flashes solve this problem with "lightboxes" and "bounce" and such -- creating more "ambient" light, overall.


- Steve S.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Hi Steve, Thanks for the great explanation. I think you are exactly right. I am looking forward to getting a dedicated flash for the d40 I just got.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"If I want to use the old film SLR (also Nikon) on occasion, will the new flash work with it as well? I assume it would be manual if it works at all?

Thanks, Erin
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Old Feb 23, 2007, 6:00 PM   #84
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Erin-

It depends of how old the Nikon FILM SLR is?? I do not believe that Nikon has always used a standardized hotshoe configuration. The easy way to check is to see if the electrical contact pattern on the SB-400 flash matchs the electrical contact pattern on the Film SLR's hot shoe.

I have found that the SB-400 works very well indeed with the D-40. I will attach a sample photo.

MT/Sarah
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Old Feb 24, 2007, 12:30 AM   #85
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John, how do you get such great family photo's and not get the red eye in all of the children in these photo's. Red eye is a huge problem for me, even when I use the camera's red eye reduction.



Riverdoode.
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Old Feb 24, 2007, 10:57 AM   #86
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riverdoode-

Using a good external flash in the bounce flash mode gives a lot of protection against the redeye problem. please se my sample photo posted above.

MT/Sarah
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Old Feb 24, 2007, 11:47 AM   #87
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mtclimber wrote:
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riverdoode-

Using a good external flash in the bounce flash mode gives a lot of protection against the redeye problem. please se my sample photo posted above.

MT/Sarah
In addition to bouncing light, I also picked up a foam board from my local Michael's store and made a bounce card to help send more light forward. It's no Gary Fong, but good enough for what I do. You can see the instructions here:
http://abetterbouncecard.com/


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Old Feb 24, 2007, 5:16 PM   #88
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If I want to use the old film SLR (also Nikon) on occasion, will the new flash work with it as well? I assume it would be manual if it works at all?
This also depends on the flash. The SB-600 or SB-800 will work in manual mode with your old Nikon SLR. The SB-400 apparently won't.

I wonder what the SB-400 does on an unsupported camera. It might not even fire. There don't seem to be any on flash controls other than the on-off switch. Everything else needs to be controlled by a supported camera.


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Old Feb 25, 2007, 3:28 PM   #89
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Thanks everyone. I did some more research and it appears that the SB-600 would work on the old film SLR (manual mode as Ken said) and the SB-400 would not. Ken, someone had posted a comment on another site/forum that the SB-400 would not fire on their old Nikon SLR.

Realistically, I probably won't use the old SLR nearly enough to consider this factor.The SB-400 does not have all the features of the SB-600 but I probably wouldn't use those features any time soon. The smaller size is very appealing. My only concern is that the sb400 has no sideways tilt. Is this a big issue?

Erin
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Old Feb 25, 2007, 4:00 PM   #90
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potter99 wrote:
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Thanks everyone. I did some more research and it appears that the SB-600 would work on the old film SLR (manual mode as Ken said) and the SB-400 would not. Ken, someone had posted a comment on another site/forum that the SB-400 would not fire on their old Nikon SLR.

Realistically, I probably won't use the old SLR nearly enough to consider this factor.The SB-400 does not have all the features of the SB-600 but I probably wouldn't use those features any time soon. The smaller size is very appealing. My only concern is that the sb400 has no sideways tilt. Is this a big issue?

Erin
The sideway tilt is what allows you to still bounce the light up the ceiling even when the camera is in portrait (vertical) position.


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