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Old Feb 12, 2007, 9:09 PM   #11
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Your friend 20D pictures are better than your Nikon Coolpix not because his mid range Canon camera but because he is an experienced photographer, let's reversse the case, give him your camera I'm sure he take better pictures thanyou use his 20D.Photographers who handle those 20D 30D and up don't shoot in Auto mode, they use Manual mode to control the camera (the robot).

You are interested in the XTI, I can give you a brief summary of what you expect in the camera. The Canon XTI has a new sensor anti-static coated to minimize dust collected on the sensor plus the vibrating mechanism to shake off the dust everytime you turn the camera on and off, less chance for you to clean the sensor for yourself unless it's a severe case. The XTI is fairly an easy camera to handle, every key features can be accessed quickly. The custom settings are veryuseful for an advanced photographer to match a specific film type, in real life shooting you appreciate this feature with quick one push of a button. An option to add a battery grip for less than $200 you can shoot much more than with one battery. The AF is sensitive borrowed from the 30D. Canon lenses and Sigma, Tamron...the sky the limit.

The XTI body is around $700, set aside $300 for the first lens starting at the wide end 17-70mm, or 18-105mm depends on availibility where you buy the camera, don't buy camera and lens at different place, you want both ship to you at the same time so you have a complete set to use. $100 more for at least a 1Gb CF card, a camera bag. So far the total is $1,100.

After a one month return policy expired, buy a Canon flash, or a battery grip. From this on, you can look for a tele zoom to cover the other long end.

Lastly, ask your friend who is using the Canon 20D to help you make the best out of this 10MP XTI.
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Old Feb 12, 2007, 10:31 PM   #12
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Thanks a lot, Coldshot-

Once again, I love the backlighting, this time with a lovely Bird of Paradise Blossom. Very nicely done! Had you given any consideration to a bit of fill-in flash to light the front of your photo a bit?

Wow, here I am, a dedicated Nikon woman, beginning to have much more than a really passing interest in the XTi, a camera. a DSLRbody on whichI definitely dislike the grip! How could that happen. Quick pull out the wrist straps!

But, thanks to you, Coldshot, I have begun to take a second look at the Canon XTi. I have a lot of lenses, both for the Pentax and the Nikon format, but very little indeed for a Canon mount. perhaps the kit lens and the 28-135mm IS, that I used to use on my 20D years ago, that is it.

But in two threads now, you have really caught my attention, with posts about the Canon XTi. Expand my knowledge a bit if you will, please. What lens are you using for a walk around lens, and for a wide angle, how about a telephoto? Pity me! I love to try new cameras, be they DSLR, or anything else.

Coldshot, do you see what you have started within me!

MT/Sarah

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Old Feb 13, 2007, 12:25 AM   #13
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Sarah,

Each photographer has his own subject to specialize in,some choose sports, or macro, landscape, nature, wildlife...mine is portraiture/wedding during my film years, I cannot post pictures of people I don't have a written consent so I choose nature in order for me to post freely pictures of flowers, zoo animals, landscape, ect.

In portraits, I use fill flash or reflector to fill in the shadow of the subject, however to fill or not to fill depends on the photographer's judgement how he sees fit, for example whenI have a subject who has a round face,I use shadow to make her face look longer, more attractive, in that case no fill flash. This is one example to fill or not to fill, there are many more cases but it'll be out of the context of thisforum what camera to buy.

Go back to the flower shot, when shooting flowers you need saturated color, that's why photographers choose Fuji Velvia slide for deep color.I chose not to use flash fill to maintain maximum well defined contrast hightlight and shadow ignoring any shade in betweencreatingthe illusion of a3D affect in the picture. Photography is art, art has no rule not like math 1+1=2, you can do 1+1=3 if you like, it's your style your signature shot.

In a DSLR, the sensor is the heart of the camera, judge yourself the XTI sensor of what it's worth, the current price is around $700, are you willing to pay that price to have the camera now or you want to wait a little longer for a price drop depends on how bad you want the camera. The same when you buy a diamond, judge the carat, cut, color, the 3C and make an offer.

You are a Nikon photographer who came from Pentax same with me, I am a Canon photographer who also came from Pentax gear. However, my partner is a Nikon photographer with the D80, we know both sides of the bad boys Canon and Nikon they are currently against each other on the XTI and the D80 but us, we are good friends, we use both systems to enjoy photography hobby.

10MP vs 6Mp, I don't want to spend $700 or less to have a 6MP camera and stand next to the guy with a solid 10MP camera, I chose to stay on high ground at 10MP.

The strenght of the XTI is b&W, the color is pleasant to work with, Canon maintain high ISO supremacy, however Nikon is closing in real fast with the D80 much better than theold D70.


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Old Feb 13, 2007, 1:08 AM   #14
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Coldshot, my friend-

BecauseI have alll these darn Nikon Lenses, what am I to do. I was literally amazed just today, whenI took the time and really paid attention, as Iwas reading Steve's review of the XTi. The XTi is a really good camera. Or at least it seems that way. It has a few more features than I never thought were really possible, even with the D-80. So yes, Instructor, that I might be, perhaps I have to change my mind.

I am thinking about it. Surely, the Nikon D-80 would be a better choice, in as much as I already have those great Nikkor lenses to use on a D-80. The challeges you give me. My God!Coldshot why do you tempt me so much!

MT/Sarah
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Old Feb 13, 2007, 8:43 AM   #15
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Between the XTI and the D80, Ilove to have both, but afraid I'll look like a tourist with both camera on my neck.

This guy was born to stand tall, I caught him with his tongue sticking out using the XTI rapid fire mode.


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Old Feb 13, 2007, 8:52 AM   #16
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So, I've pretty much decided on the XTI. However, I've been doing a little research, and apparently, an auto-stabilizing lens is the thing to have. I guess the one that comes bundled in the kit is not such a lens. Is the tamron or sigma referenced earlier fit into that category. Or is the auto stabilizing thing overrated.
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Old Feb 13, 2007, 9:15 AM   #17
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saz_1 wrote:
Quote:
So, I've pretty much decided on the XTI. However, I've been doing a little research, and apparently, an auto-stabilizing lens is the thing to have. I guess the one that comes bundled in the kit is not such a lens. Is the tamron or sigma referenced earlier fit into that category. Or is the auto stabilizing thing overrated.
First, neither of those third party lenses are stabalized. I'm probably going to offend some folks here but I am a firm believer that the whole IS thing is very overrated for MOST photography. It's useful for very slow shutter speeds where you wouldn't normally be able to hand-hold. At least in my case, I just don't run into the situation very often. I have several IS lenses and my primary walkaround lens - the 28-135 has IS but in the 3 years I've used it, the IS has been needed maybe a dozen times.

For 99% of my lowlight shooting I am either using a tripod, fast prime lens or flash. In none of those instances has IS been necessary. Also realize that IS does nothing to stop subject motion. So, if you're plannning a lot of low light hand-held shooting without fast primes you better make sure your subject doesn't move at all.

Now, on my 100-400L the IS has come into play a little more often - with some lower light wildlife shots - allowing me to take handheld shots at 400mm at 1/60 or so. But for my sports photography with telephoto lenses, IS is a non-factor. Shutter speeds need to be fast enough that IS doesn't come into play.

So, for your primary walk-around lens - ask yourself - are you really going to be taking a lot of low light shots of non-moving subjects without flash? If you are, than having IS in that lens can be beneficial. But for most people, a faster lens or a tripod or a flash will produce better results than IS.

So, for focal length lenses under 200mm I would rate IS as a nice-to-have but certainly not a 'must have' - again unless you do a lot of low-light, available light shooting of non-moving subjects.
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Old Feb 13, 2007, 9:25 AM   #18
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I agree with John, ISis far from essential. It's just nice to have.

Now that there are lots of alternatives people are prone to overlook the Canon EF-S 17-85 IS USM. This is still a very nice all-rounder IMO. Reasonably sharp, covers a nice range (equiv to 28-135 on FF) with IS, with fast and quiet USM focus motor. Not ridiculously expensive, decent build quality.

IMO still the best walkaround lens for XTI/30D.
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Old Feb 13, 2007, 11:08 AM   #19
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Not overrated IMO. Arguably overpriced.

Here are some of the Canon offerings well worth taking a look at with IS:
Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM

And one without IS also worth considering:
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM

These lenses are worth paying a bit more for. The third party lenses metioned earlier are good on a tighter budget.

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Old Feb 13, 2007, 11:13 AM   #20
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Ok. First of all, thanks to everyone for all the help. It is much appreciated, and has helped me narrow down my choices.

Basically, I'm gonna get

1) XTi (Body only)
2) Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
3) Compact Flash Card (2-4GB? - How many photos can be stored)
4) Bag (Any specific ones that are good for travelling?)
5) UV Filter (Are they all the same?)

What else am I missing?
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