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Old Feb 13, 2007, 8:21 PM   #21
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The 17-85mm IS is a nice lens to have,however with that range you can manage to handhold it quite steady with IS off until you move up to 28-135mm or 70-300mm range you need IS. At first you have some blur shot mainly you are new to a DSLR camera but after a few dozen shots you'll get the hang of it. Take advantage of Canon high ISO to increase the shutter speedyou'll get more sharp pictures. Canon cameras give you those options to combat handshake, either in IS lenses or increase shutter speed withhigh ISO.

A1GbCF card give you enough for general purpose shooting unless you do alot of continuous shots. A multicoated UV filter is around $25, more for a large lens diameter. Thepopular filters areHoya, Tiffen, B+W, I like Tiffen better, I had a few Hoya but they're not my favorite.

There are too many bags, choose one big enough for a camera,one lens and a flash.

An extra battery if you can.
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Old Feb 14, 2007, 4:33 AM   #22
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At wider angles a tripod is always better for picture quality than IS, but of course it's much less convenient.

There is an IS "sweet spot" where it is somewhat useful: 1/8 - 1/30s on the wide-angle shots.

I have found a 1Gb card to be a bit small if using RAW, so I would suggest a 2Gb or 4Gb card to get you through a full day's shooting.

As to UV filter I personally avoid them. In particular at the 17mm end of the 17-85 I found it produced fairly noticable vignetting. (with a thin & expensive Hoya Pro filter) Whether to use filters or not is a much debated topic, I'm sure you can find a dozen threads on it - one pops up every couple of weeks. I personally am on the "waste-of-time-and-money-and-degrades-image-quality" side of the debate.
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Old Feb 14, 2007, 3:34 PM   #23
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Ok. Here is what I ordered so far:
1) XTI Silver Body (Circuit City - $620+ tax = $681)
2) Canon 17-85mm IS Lens
Nova 1 AW Bag
Tiffen 58mm UV Filter (Dell - $453 + tax= $494)

I wanted to choose vendors that I wouldnt have a hard time sending stuff back to if need be, so I paid a little extra that I probably should have. Although I did use some coupons that reduced the prices a little, so its not a big deal.

I'm still looking out for a 2GB compact flash card. I'm wondering whether there is a huge difference between the speeds, or is it a bunch of bunk.

Also, does anyone recommend this book. It has good reviews at Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Digital-...F8&s=books

Any feedback is again, appreciated.

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Old Feb 14, 2007, 4:55 PM   #24
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saz-

The linked book looks pretty good. It will give you some good insights into the XTi. The documentation that comes with the XTi is pretty tough reading. However, the software package is excellent with the XTi.

Another good book is "Digital Photography by Scott Kelby.

MT/Sarah
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Old Feb 14, 2007, 8:20 PM   #25
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I'm surprised you got a good deal on the XTI, $642 for a 10MP Canon camera, I bought mine at Circuit City too, higher for a black version.

Use the UV filter as a tool not as a filter, it serves to protect the lens, easy to wipe off finger print, dust with any fabric you can find, old T-shirt.. you don't have to worry about scratching the lens, keep it on the lens all the time it also serves as a clear lens cap. When your photo skill moves up to a more challenging level, use the UV filter toturn it intoa soft focus filter for portraits.It's a goodtool.

I'd buy two 1Gb cards just in case one give you an error reading, you have a second one to test. Most cards on the market are fast compare to a few years ago.


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Old Feb 15, 2007, 4:41 PM   #26
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Thanks for all the help. I think that you've given me enough to get started on. When I get all my stuff in, I'll try and upload a shot to show you how poorly I can use it.
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Old Feb 15, 2007, 9:45 PM   #27
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You are now officially aCanon shooter, go down to the 49th floor to the Canon forum it's your new home.
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Old Feb 16, 2007, 3:02 AM   #28
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saz_1 wrote:
Quote:
So, I've pretty much decided on the XTI. However, I've been doing a little research, and apparently, an auto-stabilizing lens is the thing to have. I guess the one that comes bundled in the kit is not such a lens. Is the tamron or sigma referenced earlier fit into that category. Or is the auto stabilizing thing overrated.
Not at the end of the thread yest, but since I haven't seen it mentioned, you might seriously look at the Pentax K10D

It has internal IS, so you get IS with ANY lens, and the casmera will accept any Pentax compatible lens ever made. (with various degrees of functionality depending on lens type.... ie: older manual lens only work in manual mode... but still IS works)

I've had one a bit over a month after after an original Canon Rebel (300D) and have been very impressed by its capabilities.

The C 30Dis a sort of old camera now, and got tired of waiting for a long expected 40D.

Don't regret that decision at all.

EDIT oops to late, I see you decided on the XTi. Good luck with it.
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Old Feb 16, 2007, 3:09 AM   #29
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I'm probably going to offend some folks here but I am a firm believer that the whole IS thing is very overrated for MOST photography. It's useful for very slow shutter speeds where you wouldn't normally be able to hand-hold. At least in my case, I just don't run into the situation very often.

So, for focal length lenses under 200mm I would rate IS as a nice-to-have but certainly not a 'must have' - again unless you do a lot of low-light, available light shooting of non-moving subjects.
There is another thing it is useful for.... long lenses and low enough light you need to go below the "safe" min shutter speed = FL rule..... which for a 300 (effectively 450mm) lens that would be 1/450

And the IS in the Pentax K10D is quite impressive. Very decent shots, I have gooten even as low as 1/4 sec at 200mm (300mm) with just elbows on rail bracing....
and nice thing is the IS works on ANY lens... you don't have to rebuy the IS over and over again.

A nice leattle feature of it too is, it can be used to shake dust of the sensor, reducing cleaning necessity.
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Old Mar 16, 2007, 4:06 PM   #30
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Just thought I would come back and share some photos that I took with my new XTI. As you can tell, I'm still a novice photographer, but I enjoyed taking them.

http://picasaweb.google.com/poptani/SanDiegoScenes


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