Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 4, 2007, 7:38 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5
Default

Hi,

I bought a Olympus SP-350. It is too sluggish. I wanted a camera to take pictures of my daughter who is just 7 months old.But the problems is that she is too fast for the camera.

Could some one suggest a camera that could take contineous shots. I cant afford a Digital SLR like a nikon D70 or a Canon EOS as I find that my present camera the olympus 350 would not fetch me a dime.

What I need is a small compact camera that is cheap. A camera that I can carry every where. A rechargable battery which lasts for about 100 shots would be a great advantage. I am not really bothered about the pixels.

Looking forward to replies for my SOS

Joshua

eskools is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 4, 2007, 9:18 AM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I'd start your search with our Best Cameras List that has models that are deemed to be a good value within their market niche.

Just look at the models in the category that best fits your budget and camera size wishes and make sure to read their review conclusion sections here.

The Conclusion Section (last page before the sample images in each camera's review here) is where you'll find information on how Autofocus Speed/Reliability, cycle times between photos (with and without flash) and more stack up.

For example, this is a quote from the Conclusion Section of your Olympus model's review (and most cameras are going to be much faster than it). Always read the performance information on Steve's Conclusion page in the reviews. Notice that Steve said your Olympus was "much slower than some of the least expensive models on the market today" [and that was at the time of it's review], with that section ending with "aggravating".

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_...sp350_pg5.html

Quote:
While there are many positives to this camera, there is also a very big negative - its shooting performance. Power up until the first image is captured was average at about 3.2 seconds. The all important shutter lag (the time between pressing the shutter release and actually capturing the image) measured 2/10 of a second when pre-focused and 9/10 of a second including autofocus; much slower than some of the least expensive models on the market today. The shot to shot delay when using single exposure mode was 2.3 seconds without the flash and 4 - 10 seconds with the flash (depending on subject distance.) When I was shooting portraits with the flash at mid-telephoto range the time between shots was very aggravating.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2007, 2:30 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 822
Default

That camera btw does much better for battery life with CRVs or RCRV rechargables. It really needs the higher voltages.

I doubt that helps much on the speed though.


kenbalbari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2007, 3:55 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5
Default

Thanks a lot for your kind advice. I did try your suggestion but as you mentioned It did not help much on the speed. I have decided to change the camera but am not able to identify a good one that is in my budget. If you come across any models that might suite me, please inform.

Regards - Joshua
eskools is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 10, 2007, 11:13 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5
Default

Hey guys !!

After a lot of reading I have a feel that a "sony T - 50" might suite my requirements. Fast enough to click contineous shots and also handy to carry it every where.

Now I find a few complaints about huge white spots on your picture when you use a flash. The following link will lead you to the complaint page
http://tinyurl.com/38rfvk
and here is a sample of the white spot picture http://endrem.mystic.hu/images/t50/DSC00214.JPG

Before I buy I dont want to make the same mistake I did earlier with my olympus sp 350 and so would like to take the opinion of others in this regard. I would need flash as most of my pictures are going to be indoors with my family. Contineous shots for taking pictures of my little one is mandatory. I dont think I will need anything more than ISO 400.

Your opinions in this regard will be greatly appreciated.

Awaiting your response.
eskools is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 10, 2007, 11:32 AM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

If taking good flash photos is a high priority, I'd avoid the tiny cameras like this. They are convenient for carrying around with you. But, they have their drawbacks.

For one thing, their built in flash tends to be relatively weak (that one maxes out at around 11 feet using Auto ISO and would have less range at lower ISO speeds, more at higher ISO speeds). Some of the older T series models maxed out at around 8 feet (but, I think they're bumping the ISO speed up more now with Auto ISO in newer models to improve the range some).

Also, because the flash is located so close to the lens, redeye can be a big issue.

That spot you're looking at is reflections from a dust particle that's too close to the front of the lens that the flash illuminated. It happens (and more often with smaller models with a flash located closer to the lens).

Your best bet for better flash photos is to buy a larger camera with the flash located further away from the lens (as high up as possible). An external flash that you can get further away from the lens (not to mention being able to bounce the flash for a more diffused light source) is an even better way to go. So, you may want to look at models that have a hotshoe available for that purpose, too.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 10, 2007, 4:53 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,870
Default

eskools,

Are you looking for a camera with a fast continuous shooting mode, i.e., you hold down the shutter release and the camera keeps taking pics until you come off the shutter release? Or, are you looking for a camera the has a short cycle time i.e., ready to take the next pic in a short period of time?

By the way, the image you linked to shows a dust spot in the air. It is not a fault of the camera. It can/will happen with any camera under the same circumstances. The pic I've attached (taken with a Fuji S5100) was taken in a foundry, minutes after someone had sprayed some white powder with an aerosol can. I re-shot the pic several times with the same results. I took another pic in the same area 30 minutes later, and the white spots didn't show up.

the Hun

Attached Images
 
rinniethehun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 11, 2007, 1:54 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5
Default

Hi Hun,

Thanks for the response. I feel taking pictures on a continueous basis untill you come off the shutter realease would be an advantage. I found the burst mode in the sony T-50 perfomance in this regard satisfactory. The sony T-50 's shot to shot cycle time was also good.

Answering your question, I want to take many pictures of my little one and I dont want to miss-out on any of her actions. She is too fast for my present camera a olympus SP350. Be it the burst mode or the normal mode, the need is to take max number of quality pictures in the shotest time.

Regarding the dust spots, I found many reviews where people complained about this issue with this particular model the Sony - T50. Many have also mentioned that they have this problem only when they use the flash. As most of my photography would be indoors (mostly with the flash), I was worried if I would face the same problem.

Snappy regards - Joshua
eskools is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 11, 2007, 3:25 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5
Default

Hi Mody,

It feels nice to find people who havent seen each other help each other in this forum and that too for FREE. It kind of helps me believe that there are no bad guys in the world.

My top priority is the speed, point and shoot. Bigger cameras for me are not very attractive. My Canon SLR (Film) mostly sleeps in my locker. I dont take it out to places as I am afraid I might lose it. When you go out to the beach you dont seem to have fun as most of the time you are worried that you might loose or damage the camera. I am not comfortable giving the camera to others and so most of the time I am never to be found in the photos. Asking a stranger to take a picture of you using a SLR needs a lot of tutoring to be done. And most of all my wife hates it. The Sony T-50 would make her very happy.

So although I would like to go in for a bigger camera like the nikon D40 that is available at just about double the price, with all the features that I need, I would prefer to go in for the smaller compact model for the present. I know that discussing about smaller cameras are irritating to professionals but still have to take your help on the following issues.

I am not particular about the touch screen in the T-50. Does the T-30 have all the features of a T-50 except the touch screen?
As cameras dont have a resale value, I would like to be all the more carefull in making this decision.
Would you recomend me to buy the sony or the olympus Muj 700, or are there any other models that you can recomend?

Thanks for your patience.

snappy regards - Joshua


eskools is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:36 AM.