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Old Mar 11, 2007, 8:30 PM   #1
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is it possible to get a DSLR with a power zoom similar to an Sony H5 or is this an impossible combination? I currently have an H5 but the delay in time pressing the button to actually taking the image is longer than what I like. Maybe I need to learn to operate a DSLR however I have never learned what all the terms mean and like the automatic function of the H5 type cameras. Is what I am looking for available or is there some limitation that makes this not possible? I do like the 12X zoom and see some newer ones are approaching 15+X zoom.
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Old Mar 11, 2007, 8:50 PM   #2
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Tamron makes a 18-250mm zoom lens for popular DSLR cameras like Canon, Nikon, etc.
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Old Mar 11, 2007, 8:53 PM   #3
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What do you mean by "power zoom"?

Do you mean a zoom lens that has a motor in it that you can operate via zoom controls?

DSLR Zoom lenses are operated with a twist of the zoom ring on the lens. It's faster than an electrically powered motor.

But, if you *really* want a motor powered zoom mechanism, there are some discontinued Minolta Zoom lenses that have the ability to operate that way (although you'd have to verify that it would still work on a KM or Sony DSLR, as I don't know any one that has one). Here is one of them:

http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/detail.asp?IDLens=264

I'm not sure what you're trying to find out. From your description, it sounds like your problem is Autofocus Speed (which has nothing to do with manual versus power zoom).

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Old Mar 11, 2007, 10:50 PM   #4
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JimC wrote:
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DSLR Zoom lenses are operated with a twist of the zoom ring on the lens. It's faster than an electrically powered motor.
Not to mention more quickly precise, and without the needless battery drain.

In fact that was one of the things that got me (BACK to SLR's) was to get way from the power zooms..... AE and AF sure.... zoom that is best DIY. :-) (Except in video where tracking/continuosly variabe speed zoom is great)
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Old Mar 12, 2007, 8:49 AM   #5
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I did explain that poorly---sorry. What I mean is I like the fact that one lens can go from f 6.0 -> 72 mm (which is 36-432 mm when converted to 35 mm camera) without changing lens, and yes the part I don't like is the focus lag time. The ability to take pictures in a snap-snap-snap fashion instead of snap---------snap-------snap if that makes sense. The true power zoom vs. manual zoom is not important to me its the ability of the camera to zoom with that much magnification that I like but I don't want to carry several lens to do that if possible (or have a two wheel cart because its so heavy).

Thanks for your patience with this newbie!
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Old Mar 12, 2007, 9:02 AM   #6
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There are some ultra zoom type lenses available that are relatively small and light.

Most entry level DSLR models have sensors that are smaller than 35mm film. As a result, you'll have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnification) for any given focal length lens, compared to using the same focal length on a 35mm camera.

To see how the lenses would compare to a lens on a 35mm camera, just multiply the focal length by either 1.5x (Nikon, Pentax, Konica Minolta, Sony DSLR models), or 1.6x (Canon entry level DSLR models).

For example, if you mounted a Tamron 18-200mm lens on a Nikon, Pentax, Konica Minolta or Sony DSLR model, it would behave more like a 27-300mm lens would on a 35mm camera from an angle of view perspective.

Or, if you mounted a Tamron 28-300mm lens on one of these cameras, it would behave more like a 42-450mm lens would on a 35mm camera.

As previously mentioned, Tamron has a new 18-250mm lens out now, too (it may not be available in stores yet). This one would give you the same zoom range on an entry level DSLR that you'd have using a 27-375mm lens on a 35mm camera if you used it on a Nikon, Pentax, Sony, or Konica Minolta DSLR model. Or, if used on a Canon model like the XT, XTi or EOS-30D, it would give you a slightly longer equivalent of 29-400mm (same angle of view you'd have using a 29-400mm lens on a 35mm camera).

Note that most of these lenses are not the brightest around (espcially on their longer ends), and the optical quality may not compare to using zooms with less ambitious design goals (not as much range from short to long). But, they are convenient and many users like them.

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Old Mar 12, 2007, 12:37 PM   #7
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Others have mentioned the extended zoom options for the DSLRs. I just want to say that the lenses are interchangable on DSLRs and extended zooms are built with compromises to get those ranges.

Most DSLR owners prefer a couple of lenses to cover thatzoom range as overall image quality would be better. Lens changes are quick and not complex.


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