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Old Mar 28, 2007, 7:01 PM   #11
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I agree with JohnG-

This is certainly one case where Canoncertainly doestriumph over Nikon.Last chance:take a look at this combination: Nikon D-40 or D-80with a Nikkor 70-300mmVR lens. You will have full IS in a great package.

It is not as flexible as Canon, but it is the best Nikon combo (in my humble opinion) that we can arrive at for your situation.

MT/Sarah
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Old Mar 29, 2007, 6:54 AM   #12
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mtclimber wrote:
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I agree with JohnG-

This is certainly one case where Canoncertainly doestriumph over Nikon.Last chance:take a look at this combination: Nikon D-40 or D-80with a Nikkor 70-300mmVR lens. You will have full IS in a great package.
Sarah - Just to be clear I'm not recommending the Canon over the Nikon. Both the Nikon D80 and Canon XTi will fit the bill just fine. The d40 is another matter - the scaled down focus system would make it a very poor choice for use as a sports camera.

As to the 70-300 VR - again it depends. It's the perfect Nikon lens IF the OP is only going to shoot games in good light. If there are alot of overcast games in the late afternoon or any games under lights, the 5.6 aperture won't be good enough. And IS won't help in a sports situation like baseball/softball. So - if lighting is always good the Nikon 70-300vr or Canon 70-300IS are the lenses I would choose in each system. If you've got a lot of overcast conditions but no night games then the Sigma 100-300 (for either system) is probably the best choice. If you throw in games under the lights that's another matter entirely.

By the way - welcome back, Sarah !!
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Old Mar 29, 2007, 5:52 PM   #13
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Thank you, John, for the welcome back-

However, I will be home only for about a week before I head out again to conduct more workshops. Thanks for adding to my sports photography data bank.After reading your post carefully, I thoroughly agree that Canon is the best tool for the baseball situation.

Thanks!

MT/Sarah
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Old Mar 30, 2007, 1:44 AM   #14
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the5macs wrote:
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I am searching for my first DSLR and am down to the two I think would be the best, the Nikon D80 and the Canon XTi, but the two are so close in most respects that I don't have a clue which one to get.
Just to confuse things a bit more you really ought to give consideration to the Pentax K10D (or K100D if budget is tight)

I moved up from a Canon orig Rebel 300D to the new Pentax K10D and no regrets at all, and love that any lens I put on is is stabelized (even an old antique manual one) rather than having to buy an IS system over and over again with every lens , and a limited choice of only the newest lens for that.
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Old Apr 2, 2007, 4:30 PM   #15
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Just some things to ponder over the next year. The important thing I wanted to impart was to factor in what lenses you would likely need and the cost associated so you could figure that into your calculations. That should give you some more to think about while you wait for prices to drop on the bodies.

New DSLR camera- $$

New lenses for DSLR- $$$

Advise from JohnG- priceless

Thank you so much for everything. I think I have a good idea now of what I need. Looks like my daughter will be playing first base instead of second, but I am still going toget the 300lens in case she doesn't next year. This will be her last year of Jr. League, next year is, as they say, "A whole nother ballgame".

I do have at least one more question. I've read many times not to get the lenses in a kit with the camera. Does this apply to all lenses even if it states that they are Canon? If so, could you please explain what the difference is and what I need to be aware of when I do go to buy?

Thanks again.





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Old Apr 2, 2007, 4:45 PM   #16
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the5macs wrote:
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I do have at least one more question. I've read many times not to get the lenses in a kit with the camera. Does this apply to all lenses even if it states that they are Canon? If so, could you please explain what the difference is and what I need to be aware of when I do go to buy?

Thanks again.
Glad to help. As to your question, kit lenses are intended to be a low cost introductory lens. They're usually a good value because it is only a $100 increase over the body alone (ok maybe more for some kits now). No doubt some of the other manufacturers have better kit lenses than Canon. But, unless you have a very good idea what you want in your walk-around lens (the lens that you tend to keep on your camera most of the time) the kit lens in any system is a great way to start out. The challenge with buying a "better" lens right out of the gate is that you:
a. spend more money and
b. might get a lens that doesn't meet your needs because you don't understand your needs yet.

As an example, one person might suggest you get something like a third party 24-75 as your walk-around. YOU (after you shoot) may find that 75mm is too short for a lot of what you like to do or you may find out that 24mm is not wide enough. That's the risk with ponying up right out of the gate for a better lens than the kit lens. The flip side is there's a good chance you'll be replacing the kit lens after a short while. But at least when you do so, you do it with knowledge about where YOU found the kit lens lacking. I personally skipped the kit lens when I got my first DSLR but I had a pretty good idea of what I needed.

Now, when a secondary interest such as sports or wildlife is in the mix - that's pretty simple to suggest lenses for. Those types of photography have very specific requirements.

By the way - with your daughter playing first you definitely want the 300mm. Why? Well because you want to shoot her from the third base line so you can see her face and not see her rear end:







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