Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 8, 2007, 2:41 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Corpsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 879
Default

1eyedeer wrote:
Quote:
I accept that you cannot anticipate all your feature needs, but it is foolish to pay for bells and whistles if you don't use them.
I've never used the air bag in my car and don't anticipate needing it. I want my money back.

Those extra features are useless until they're not. The only way I could agree with that statement is if you are 100% dedicated to not learning anything new. Those "bells and whistles" aren't just noises, they are useful tools to improve your photography.

I'm a bit surprised to hear the D40 doesn't have exposure bracketing though. I can't imagine not having it on a camera, especially not on a DSLR. Perhaps if you always get perfect exposures on the first try, or if you never shoot anything high contrast like a sunrise or sunset you won't need it, but I didn't think the D40 was being marketed to perfect photographers who only shoot in easy conditions.
Corpsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 8, 2007, 3:43 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 200
Default

I anticipated that my post would generate a response and Corpsy wrote:

"I've never used the air bag in my car and don't anticipate needing it. I want my money back."

If you had driven over a million miles you would not make that statement because you would drive defensively, i.e., you would expect someone at some time to do something to cause an accident. I happen to think that exposure bracketing is a useful feature - I just don't use it because at my level of photography it isn't critical to get perfect exposure on a particular shot. In difficult conditions I would rather take a series of pictures with different settings and see what works best. Thats part of the fun for me!

Having read thousands of words in reviews, forum posts, and purchasers opionions, and based on my limited experience with 5 other digital compact cameras, the D40 seemed to offer enough features to help me learn to be a better photographer. I am still experimenting with the settings but nothing so far has changed my mind, andresponsiveness and performance in low light without and with flash are a delight.

A perfect first DSLR for me, but probably any of the others would have been too.
1eyedeer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 8, 2007, 3:40 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Corpsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 879
Default

I can't tell whether or not you understood that I was being sarcastic, so I'll leave that argument to rest.

The point I was really trying to argue is where you said that the D40 is the best deal right now. It seems to me that other cameras in the same price range have a lot more to offer with more features and greater lens selection, and with the D40 or especially the D40x, you sacrifice a lot of useful options only to have the Nikon brand affixed to your camera body.

As for exposure bracketing, I'm certain that many people don't get much use out of it and I'm not going to argue that everyone should have it and use it. For some it's a great shortcut to ensure one of their photos came out great, and some like yourself would prefer to take the time and try to get that shot manually.

However, there are certainly instances where it can be used to achieve a level of quality not achievable any other way. If you're photographing a scene with a high level of contrast, like a person standing in the foreground of a setting sun, and you want everything to look well exposed, blending a few bracketed shots taken on a tripod and blending them together in Photoshop is far and away the best way of getting that perfect exposure. If someone is serious about landscape photography or even certain kinds of indoor photography, a feature like that can be crucial.

Not to drag this out, but it also just mystifies me that a feature like that would be left out when it probably wouldn't have cost anything to include. Unless the camera is incapable of doing a 3 shot burst in raw, or doesn't have exposure compensation, there's just no reason for it. Hopefully they'll fix that in a firmware update.
Corpsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 8, 2007, 5:48 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 200
Default

Nikon must have left it out deliberately to differentiate from the D80. Another "missing" featureis the DOF preview, which every other DSLR camera seems to offer. They must have been pretty confident of their marketing strategy to new DSLR users. They presumably judged that the small body size, Nikon's reputation and available lens system (even if reduced), good images without processing, low light performance, etc, were enough to compensate for lack of such features. Looks as if they were right from their increase in employees at their Thailand factory in order to increase production.

http://nikonblog.wordpress.com/2007/...ts-production/
1eyedeer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 6:43 AM   #15
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

1eyedeer wrote:
Quote:
They presumably judged that the small body size, Nikon's reputation and available lens system (even if reduced), good images without processing, low light performance, etc, were enough to compensate for lack of such features.
out of curiosity, have you ever looked to see just how reduced it actually is? I believe out of the 40 some lenses in Nikon's system you are reduced to 7. Fast primes? sorry! Tamron lenses? Sorry! Tokina lenses? Sorry! Sigma non-HSM lenses? Sorry. None of the above will autofocus with the D40 or D40x. So a year from now when you want to buy a new lens, you're severely limited as to which lenses you could buy. Where as those who own the D50 can happily buy any lens available to the Nikon system.

Of course Nikon understands the market. But that doesn't make it a good product to buy if you're ever planning on buying more lenses or getting into more advanced photography. If you do, then you force yourself to buy a new camera body (which of course is exactly what Nikon would like you to do) when the 'old' D40 is still in good order.

Now, I am a very pro-Nikon person. But, IMO, there are better options in the Nikon system than these cameras.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 7:08 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Quote:
out of curiosity, have you ever looked to see just how reduced it actually is? I believe out of the 40 some lenses in Nikon's system you are reduced to 7. Fast primes? sorry! Tamron lenses? Sorry! Tokina lenses? Sorry! Sigma non-HSM lenses? Sorry. None of the above will autofocus with the D40 or D40x. So a year from now when you want to buy a new lens, you're severely limited as to which lenses you could buy. Where as those who own the D50 can happily buy any lens available to the Nikon system.
That's assuming the user will want to buy a new lens. I'd bet the vast majority of folks using this camera will stick with the kit lens and maybe a telezoom and call it day. There aren't many casual snap shooters using primes anymore because of the lack of flexibility. In reality, to do much better lens wise than the 7 or so that are compatible (aside from bright primes, which aren't terribly expensive, but again aren't widely used by the casual shooter)you're getting into pro/serious amateur level glass, which is going to be out of the price range of most casual shooters anyway. Plus these lenses cover themost common focal lengths, and have VR available (if you're willing to pay for it). When someone realizes they want more, they'll likely take the next step up anyway and get the D80. I think for the target market, the D40 is a fine choice. Sure it's not going to work for the seasoned amateur or working pro, but that's not who the camera is designed for.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 7:13 AM   #17
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

What about all the third party lenses? Those ARE targeting the same market. There are a lot of very affordable consumer level lenses being eliminated. Now, if the D50 is no longer available then you just don't have a hoice - in which case I think Nikon has done their customers a disservice by eliminating the d50 level camera from their system.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 7:50 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 822
Default

Quote:
out of curiosity, have you ever looked to see just how reduced it actually is? I believe out of the 40 some lenses in Nikon's system you are reduced to 7.
It's actually not that bad. You may be thinking of there only being 7 or 8 Nikon prime lenses, most of them longer telephoto lengths. But overall there's about 23 lenses from Nikon and 17 or 18 from Sigma. So about 40 choices.

The zoom options really aren't bad. Most of the Nikon zooms are AF-S, especially the better and more recent ones. The problem is with wide to short tele primes. These smaller lenses probably focused fairly well with in-body systems, so there was previously less need to make them AF-S. They really should have updated a few before introducing the new cameras.

While I'm sure Nikon would like people to upgrade to more expensive models, I'm not convinced that this is the reason for this limitation. The more likely result right now is that they are forcing people to buy a Sigma lens (30mm f1.4 or 14mm f2.8 ) when there is no Nikon fast prime available.

This limitation, as well as features and controls, make the D50 worth considering as an alternative. However, I think the newer D40 also has some advantages in image quality and performance, and is near the same price. I think for many this isn't an easy choice. And really, all entry level models seem to have some limitations.

kenbalbari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 8:16 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

JohnG wrote:
Quote:
What about all the third party lenses? Those ARE targeting the same market. There are a lot of very affordable consumer level lenses being eliminated. Now, if the D50 is no longer available then you just don't have a hoice - in which case I think Nikon has done their customers a disservice by eliminating the d50 level camera from their system.
I don't think Nikon is concerned about 3rd party lenses and if they'll work or not. If the 3rd party players want to be in the game, its up to them to make lenses compatible with the bodies..it's not up to Nikon to create bodies for Sigma, Tamron, Tokina etc to hang their lenses on. I agree it is limiting, but as was mentioned earlier, the only lenses lacking in the lineup are bright primes. And as I said before, I don't think many consumers (the casual, everyday snapshooter)are all that interested in using primes or having a huge arsenal of lenses at their disposal.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 12:49 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 200
Default

JohnG says that someone who wants a new lens for the D40 will be severely limited - not true!

David Chin made a good post in the dpreview forum giving reverences to the available Nikon/Sigma options available right now:
http://nikond40.dpnotes.com/nikkor-lenses-that-af-on-the-d40/
http://nikond40.dpnotes.com/nikon-d40-and-sigma-lenses/

For Nikon I counted 9 zooms, 1 macro and 4 fixed telephoto up to 400 mm.

For Sigma I counted 17 lens with HSM, including a low light prime, 30 mm f1.4.
1eyedeer is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:19 AM.