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Old Mar 15, 2007, 9:28 AM   #1
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My current set up for Cameras is a 35mm SLR in the 300 EOS (Rebel something or other for you guys in the States and Canada) with a telephoto and wide angle lens and a Canon A520. Because I am happy with the 35mm and aware of the expense of upgrading to a DSLR I have decided to upgrade the A520 (which is very capable for a compact - see below photo) to a bridge camera with a view to eventually getting a DSLR.

I have been looking at the various 'superzoom' cameras and I am stuck inbetween the Canon S3IS and the Fuji S6500fd/S6000fd.

The Fuji seems great apart the lack of Image stabilisation (I usually take landscapes and as I like to hike with a daysac a tripod is not always practical) which I have read in a couple of reviews is lacking. At what zoom level does this because a problem? If it is okay till 6/7 I am not particularly bothered as I shouldn't need to be zooming beyond that for landscapes and, I suppose, if I know something is worth zooming in on beyond that I can take a tripod. I've also heard of the Fuji over processing jpegs, this is a bit of a concern - can anyone confirm this? Is it worth paying the extra £50 for the S9600/S9100?

I was originally pointed in the direction of the Canon which seemed like a good choice, however I heard it gets noisey right from ISO 200 and the lack of RAW. (especially as it costs £50 ($90) more) is a bit off putting. However, the IS is a plus point. I'm also sick of Canon menus! Not enough to make me not choose Canon, but they really need to sort them out!

Any input would be gladly received!!

Here is a shot from Iceland taken with my A520 at sunrise last November (a leisurely 10.30 sunrise if my memory serves me right!)


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Old Mar 15, 2007, 10:05 AM   #2
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My .02 -

Skip the "pro-sumer"/mega-zoom entirely. Stick with what you have, the P&S and SLR................or jump right into a DSLR.

The price of the "pseudo-DSLRs" you mention is too close & likely you'll find any of them lacking when compared to your SLR. You're getting nice shots with your A520 & for serious work you have the SLR.

Me? I'd save the extra bucks & go with a Canon = you can use your current glass.
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Old Mar 15, 2007, 10:16 AM   #3
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I think dpreview said something like this about the Fuji S6000fd. If you need the extra zoom (420mm vs 300mm) and are going to be taking pictures mostly in daylight, the S3 might be a better choice. However, the S6000fd is very good at low light shots and its resolution is as ggod as many of its competitors which have more megapixels.

I have the S9100. I like it. The S6000fd is a hundred dollars cheaper. I would probably go for the Fuji. However, my brother has the Canon S3 and likes it.
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Old Mar 15, 2007, 10:59 AM   #4
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I very rarely shoot people, being much more interested in landscapes - I'm the son of a Scottish geography teacher!!! So, generally speaking, I will be shooting in good conditions and land and townscapes (I'm going to Québec for a month in July) and I don't tend to take many pictures in museums and the like - I can never seem to do them justice. Based upon that the cameras performance to 200 is key, stretching to 400 for those cloudy days over here!

Bailey59 has a point about waiting till I can afford a DSLR but I think I would like a stop gap none the less. I would like to give the A520 to my Grandfather who has a very basic digital camera at the moment.


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Old Mar 15, 2007, 12:20 PM   #5
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Quote:
I very rarely shoot people, being much more interested in landscapes
Kodak P880? 24mm on the wide end = very nice for landscapes, good image quality up to ISO 400 (though with the quickish 2.8 shouldn't be needed too often :-))


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Old Mar 15, 2007, 2:16 PM   #6
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If you can find a Kodak P880 at a decent price, it would be worth consideration. One advantage of the Fuji S6000fd and the Kodak P880 is the maximum wide angle shots possible (28mm for the former and 24mm for the latter vs. 35mm for the Canon).
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Old Mar 15, 2007, 3:04 PM   #7
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I'd look at one of the 12x super zooms with image stabilization that also has a wide angle attachment since you hike without a tripod. The Kodak P712, Panasonic FZ7 & FZ30, Sony H5,are in this category as well as the S3IS.

Noise is factor on all this class of camera but I think it needs to be put in perspective. My experience with the Kodak Z612 is that noise at ISO 400 is about the same as the grain on Ektachome 400 on a 35mm camera.

How often do you really expect to be post processing? RAW really assumes that your going to post process most of the photos you'll use. Otherwise fine jpg really should handle your requirements.
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Old Mar 15, 2007, 4:19 PM   #8
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amazing how many people end up deciding between those two cameras! I went that way also to avoid the expense of a DSLR. In reality, I could get three S6000's for the price of a DSLR with a macro lense and still be lacking the longer range zoom.

I was stuck between the S3 and the S6000 (search my username and you can see my posts). In fact, I actually bought the S3 IS, kept it for a week, then exchanged it for the S6000fd. I'm much happier now. The S3 is a great little camera, really loved the feel and looks, and some of the nifty little 'tricks' (like color swap and such) but my personal reasons for switching were these.

S3
1) The S3 did start showing noise at iso 200 (just a bit, 400 much more and 800 eek!) so I left it on 100 all the time. This ruined my whole idea of taking indoor shots without a flash.

2) The auto zoom was so fast, that it was hard to dial it in. You pull the level and ziiip your zoomed in too much, pull back and ziiiiip back too far. ... there goes the bird by then!

3) If the light wasn't bright, it would mis-focus quite often. And the manual focus was really hard to use. So I'd just keep making it focus over and over and shoot a bunch hoping one would focus right. Not that it happend all the time, but just in darker places.

S6000
1) I have taken quite a few shots, even up to iso 800 that looked darned good. Indoors and out. This does help with the lack of IS as you can shoot with a faster shutter at iso 400 for example, than at 100 and if I just hold 'steady' my shots look blur free. (no tripod)
The IS on the canon does work really well, but it was the only 'one up' I could find compared to many 'downs'.

2) The zoom ring is great. I can zoom as slow or fast as I want and to the point I want. Also, the 28mm wide is nice.

3) It seems to focus much more accurately, it misses much less often and if it is having an issue due to some odd lighting or something, the manual focus ring is much easier to manipulate. It's not as easy as a real SLR manual focus, but close enough that it's usable.

Quality of pics
Side by side at say iso 100, both produce very nice pics. The Canon is smaller and I think really cool looking but for me, the Fuji is more 'usable'.

Hope that helps a bit!
Cheers!
Ron

(here's a couple Fuji pics)




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Old Mar 15, 2007, 4:24 PM   #9
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I would recommend a DSLR, I once had a Fuji S9500 but I was frustrated with the slow performance and poor IQ in low light.

I would wait, save a bit more and look seriously at something like the Nikon D40 or any other entry level DSLR.


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Old Mar 15, 2007, 5:15 PM   #10
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Think im leaning towards the Fuji - I'll just have to have steady hands like a sniper or just learn to take a tripod for the long zoom! Im surpriced Fuji didn't include it...

As for RAW this is appealing as I often spen ages tinkering with photos with photoshop etc and being able to do this from an early stage is very appealing!

Waiting for a DSLR - I'm just not that patient! Plus im happy enough with my SLR, I just want to upgrade my digital


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