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Old Apr 7, 2007, 9:26 AM   #11
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Excellent summary by fldspringer! The DSLR has the more potential but it isn't a magic box either. To get the most out of it you have to learn about photographic principles (your mind is more powerful than a computer chip - so relying on the camera to always choose exposure/focus/DOF can lead to poor results even with the best DSLR). And the lenses, flashes, accessories necessary to get the most out of a DSLR add up in expense and bulk.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"So it is not, IMO, a no-brainer when deciding between the two. If you need the versatility/power a DSLR provides then you need it. If you don't however, then the flexibility of the point and shoot wins out.
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Old Apr 10, 2007, 10:19 AM   #12
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Hayward wrote:
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TCav wrote:
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In general, dSLRs have less shuttler lag, and better lenses with wider aperatures than P&S digicams.

But when you buy a dSLR, you're not just buying a camera, you're buying into a photography system. That means that, over time, you will have accumulated lenses and other accessories, so when it comes time to replace the camera, you will be best served with a replacement that can use the same accessories. That kind of thing doesn't happen with a P&S.
Well I will disagree on a few points there.

1) I was well served by 2 inexpensive zoom lenses on my Original 300D Canon Rebel (18-55mm kit and 70-300mm SIGMA).... but didn't think twice about dumping Canon for the Pentax K10D.....
(Actually had some other lenses for Canon along they way but already come and gone/resold)

I'd used it enough to feel guility to sell the 300D body to anyone for more than peanuts (over 40K frames)... and its now with one lens an emergency back up/danger DSLR.

Canon lenses are EASY to sell.

Now I am collecting enough (mostly used/cheap) Pentax lenses that I may end up now sticking with them. And some of that old Pentax glass is really NICER than some made now... and you can use ANY lens every made for Pentax pretty much.

2) I am also still even using some of my old P&S and Canon filters and such because they fit or can be stepped up for my current Pentax lenses.

Sure you instnatly commit you self to several more than camera cost Canon/Nikon high end lenses then yeah you can start to feel a bit commited.... but then again both have good/easy resale value.



QUESTION Do you think you will be sticking with these used / cheap lenses when the new Pentax offerings arrive! are they worth sticking with! some must be very oldI saw 1980 lenses for sale on e bay, I notice Pentax are no longer sticking with the partner ship agreement withHoya it seems.?So the new Pentax lens question remains in question maybe seeing Hoya have inputI believe withPentax lenses is that true .
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Old Apr 10, 2007, 2:00 PM   #13
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If you were looking for a Prosumer Camera, I have a Panasonic FZ30 and it is great. Some prefer it to the newer model out. And as it is 55mm, you can purchase raynox marco lenses, Olympus Wide Angle or Teleconverter lenses, etc. This is just one opinionfrom a prosumer user.
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Old Apr 10, 2007, 3:04 PM   #14
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You've had very good advice already but I'll add my comments. If you want a zoom of at least 6 x, a superzoom will cost a lot less than a DSLR with kit lens + 6x zoom lens, particularly if you are not seduced by the latest models. Superzooms have good image quality, a huge zoom in a compact body, a lot of manual control, and better indoor performance than most compacts (but not as good as DSLRs). Superzooms also have good movie modes which means that you don't need to take a video camera on holiday, unless you want to take hours of video. For your garden work, you probably want a wider angle than the normal 35 mm, and several models now provide this.

There is no question that DSLRs give the best results, and are esential in certain testing conditions, but the current superzooms are pretty good and cope well with most conditions to give nice images straight out of the camera. I was at a similar stage to you and bought a superzoom and have been very pleased with it. I also acquired an entry level DSLR recently to try more difficult things, but not because of dissatisfaction with the superzoom. Buying the superzoom first was still the right decision for me at that time, and I still intend to use it a lot.
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Old Apr 10, 2007, 3:10 PM   #15
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Just realised that I've said the same thing twice! Apologies for the senior moment. The good part is that at least it was the same advice.
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Old Apr 11, 2007, 1:03 PM   #16
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nstewart wrote:
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Ive had a 1.3 megapixel olympus camera for around 5 years now and have finally decided to get a new camera but im not sure which type to go for. I can either get a digital slr or a point and shoot. I need a camera that will be quick for snapshots but also have a good zoom and obviously high pixel rate. I will be using it for work (taking pictures of gardens and transforming them on a computer) but also holiday use. I can get a mid-range slr or a high-end point and shoot for the same price. Can anyone help me decide
I tried the Superzoom route and hated it. Just not happy with the resullts in low light. I sent it back andwithlittle bit more money I ended up with a DSLR and a lens with virtually the same zoom range. It all depends on what and how you buy it, but it takes a bit of research. I laterbought a small Fuji pocket camera that works well in lowlight for those times when aDSLR is not convenient or allowed. Of course not everyone wants multiple cameras and lenses. If you do decide on a Superzoom and need decent results in low light take a look at the Fujis.
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Old Apr 18, 2007, 11:59 AM   #17
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SLR: Olympus Evolt-500, you get 2 lenses for same price as Canon xTi.

pro-sumer: Lumix FZ-50, Canon S3 IS, Fuji S9000.

Stay away from Kodak P850/P712/P880 as they have too long shutter lag, problems with crashing, although they are cheaper than above.

P&S: Casio EX-Z60.






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Old Apr 18, 2007, 2:03 PM   #18
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romphotog wrote:
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pro-sumer: Lumix FZ-50, Canon S3 IS, Fuji S9000.

Stay away from Kodak P850/P712/P880 as they have too long shutter lag, problems with crashing, although they are cheaper than above.

I think these statements are suspect. Comparing the shutter lag data in Steve's tests for the Kodak P712, the Cannon S3IS and the Fuji S9000 contradicts the long shutter lag statement. Examining the Kodak forum doesn't seem to support the system crash allegations either.
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Old Apr 18, 2007, 8:10 PM   #19
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ac.smith wrote:
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romphotog wrote:
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pro-sumer: Lumix FZ-50, Canon S3 IS, Fuji S9000.

Stay away from Kodak P850/P712/P880 as they have too long shutter lag, problems with crashing, although they are cheaper than above.

I think these statements are suspect. Comparing the shutter lag data in Steve's tests for the Kodak P712, the Cannon S3IS and the Fuji S9000 contradicts the long shutter lag statement. Examining the Kodak forum doesn't seem to support the system crash allegations either.
I am confused by your reply. Are you saying the Kodak P850 _does not_ have a long
shutter lag? Well, it sure does. I suggest you check the reviews at Amazon and:
http://shopping.yahoo.com




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Old Apr 18, 2007, 9:19 PM   #20
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Did I say anything about a P850? Is it a current model? I think it's a generation older than current models and it is slower than current models, specifically the P712, S3IS etc.
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