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Old Apr 5, 2007, 12:33 PM   #1
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Ive had a 1.3 megapixel olympus camera for around 5 years now and have finally decided to get a new camera but im not sure which type to go for. I can either get a digital slr or a point and shoot. I need a camera that will be quick for snapshots but also have a good zoom and obviously high pixel rate. I will be using it for work (taking pictures of gardens and transforming them on a computer) but also holiday use. I can get a mid-range slr or a high-end point and shoot for the same price. Can anyone help me decide
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Old Apr 5, 2007, 1:08 PM   #2
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In general, dSLRs have less shuttler lag, and better lenses with wider aperatures than P&S digicams.

But when you buy a dSLR, you're not just buying a camera, you're buying into a photography system. That means that, over time, you will have accumulated lenses and other accessories, so when it comes time to replace the camera, you will be best served with a replacement that can use the same accessories. That kind of thing doesn't happen with a P&S.

So buying a P&S is simple, but buying a dSLR is complicated. You'll need to consider the kinds of lenses and accessories you might ever need.

Some food for thought. Sorry, but there's no simple answer.
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Old Apr 5, 2007, 1:10 PM   #3
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From your post, it sounds like you want a nice point and shoot with alot of zoom, without messing with box full of lenses...You have alot of options with this type of camera that has 10-12x zooms....Steves has a list of 6 or 8 very good ones...
check them out....

http://www.steves-digicams.com/best_cameras.html

:G


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Old Apr 5, 2007, 5:42 PM   #4
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I would add to the good advice already given. The super zooms from Canon, Sony, Panasonic , Fiji, and Olympus should do virtually everything you want in Auto or Scene mode, but they also offer levels of manual control comparable to DSLRs. Another plus is the good video for holiday use - I don't take the video camera now.
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Old Apr 5, 2007, 11:04 PM   #5
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Kodak has good super-zooms as well. I'm very satisfied with my Kodak Z612.

TCAv's comments on DSLR/super-zoom are on target. With a DSLR you'll accumulate addition lenses over time and when upgrade time comes you will pretty much be looking for an upgraded body for the lens system you already have. With any P & S including the super-zooms you'll replace the whole camera when upgrade time comes around.

During the film era I had both 35 SLRs and interchangeble lens medium format cameras and took on professional work. At this point in my life I never intend to do pro work again so buying a high end P & S meets my needs and I plan on just replacing it every five years or so. The current crop IS super-zooms are the high end P & Ss. If you see a different future for yourself then your call should be different.
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Old Apr 6, 2007, 1:13 AM   #6
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TCav wrote:
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In general, dSLRs have less shuttler lag, and better lenses with wider aperatures than P&S digicams.

But when you buy a dSLR, you're not just buying a camera, you're buying into a photography system. That means that, over time, you will have accumulated lenses and other accessories, so when it comes time to replace the camera, you will be best served with a replacement that can use the same accessories. That kind of thing doesn't happen with a P&S.
Well I will disagree on a few points there.

1) I was well served by 2 inexpensive zoom lenses on my Original 300D Canon Rebel (18-55mm kit and 70-300mm SIGMA).... but didn't think twice about dumping Canon for the Pentax K10D.....
(Actually had some other lenses for Canon along they way but already come and gone/resold)

I'd used it enough to feel guility to sell the 300D body to anyone for more than peanuts (over 40K frames)... and its now with one lens an emergency back up/danger DSLR.

Canon lenses are EASY to sell.

Now I am collecting enough (mostly used/cheap) Pentax lenses that I may end up now sticking with them. And some of that old Pentax glass is really NICER than some made now... and you can use ANY lens every made for Pentax pretty much.

2) I am also still even using some of my old P&S and Canon filters and such because they fit or can be stepped up for my current Pentax lenses.

Sure you instnatly commit you self to several more than camera cost Canon/Nikon high end lenses then yeah you can start to feel a bit commited.... but then again both have good/easy resale value.




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Old Apr 6, 2007, 1:25 AM   #7
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All photography is a compromise. A year ago I thought I wasn't going to touch a dSR (been there, done that with film) so I replaced my beloved Sony F717 with a Panasonic FZ30. Now many people love their FZ30s and I've seen a number of excellent pictures taken with them. However, I couldn't get much that satisfied me - it was definitely not the right camera for me. AT the time I didn't think any other p&s would give me any better quality so I bit the bullet and went back to carrying a bag full of photo equipment (much of it were the same lenses I had dragged around with my film SLR). I quickly discovered that it wasn't so bad as I remembered, and I'm now carting around a heavier camera just about everywhere.

That was the right decision for me. However, it sure isn't for everyone! A dSLR will give better image quality, but the current crops of p&s cameras are better than they were a year ago and are lots more convenient. Are you like me, where you'll object more to the compromises that a p&s makes in image quality than to dragging around a large camera that often seems very fussy? Or are you going to be more like those who say all that bother isn't worth it? There's no one answer to fit everyone.

An add-on to the comment about dSLRs being buying into a photo system - it's very true. While the camera itself with the kit lens isn't that expensive, there will ALWAYS be another lens that you just have to have and the ultimate cost is going to be more than your initial investment. The good side about that is that lenses can last a long time - I'm still using ones I bought in 1980 (and I've used them on multiple cameras).
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Old Apr 6, 2007, 1:13 PM   #8
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Or if money is not an issue, get one of each. :-)
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Old Apr 6, 2007, 7:53 PM   #9
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Hayward wrote:
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TCav wrote:
Quote:
In general, dSLRs have less shuttler lag, and better lenses with wider aperatures than P&S digicams.

But when you buy a dSLR, you're not just buying a camera, you're buying into a photography system. That means that, over time, you will have accumulated lenses and other accessories, so when it comes time to replace the camera, you will be best served with a replacement that can use the same accessories. That kind of thing doesn't happen with a P&S.
Well I will disagree on a few points there.

1) I was well served by 2 inexpensive zoom lenses on my Original 300D Canon Rebel (18-55mm kit and 70-300mm SIGMA).... but didn't think twice about dumping Canon for the Pentax K10D.....

2) I am also still even using some of my old P&S and Canon filters and such because they fit or can be stepped up for my current Pentax lenses.
So you took the time and effort (and the financial toll) of selling off the major components of one system while buying into another. That was a drastic step, but not an unreasonable one.

But when someone is considering their first dSLR purchase, I think it's unlikely that the resale value would be one of their top 10 concerns.
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Old Apr 7, 2007, 8:10 AM   #10
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nstewart wrote:
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Ive had a 1.3 megapixel olympus camera for around 5 years now and have finally decided to get a new camera but im not sure which type to go for. I can either get a digital slr or a point and shoot. I need a camera that will be quick for snapshots but also have a good zoom and obviously high pixel rate. I will be using it for work (taking pictures of gardens and transforming them on a computer) but also holiday use. I can get a mid-range slr or a high-end point and shoot for the same price. Can anyone help me decide
Point and shoot cameras use smaller sensors and that can be a good thing, or a bad thing.

The good thing is small sensors don't require large lenses and that makes for a much lighter, and generally easier to use package. Its more convenient. In addition, the small sensors have huge depth of field in comparison to the DSLR sensors. That can be a good thing, or a bad thing. See a pattern developing here? The good is that you can take a landscape photo and have everything from the foreground to the horizon in focus easier than with a DSLR. That large depth of field is also a benifit if you tend to be a bit sloppy in focusing. The bad thing is you can take a photo of your subject and you proudly hand the print to someone and the first thing they notice is the guy in the background is drinking a beer and his thumb is on the "B" of the Budweiser.

DSLRs have large sensors and tend to have better dynamic range.This means that you can see whats in the shadowsin the photo more easily with these cameras. Large sensors perform better in low light, in part because they can increase the sensitivity of the sensor (ISO) more.

The entry level DSLRs have P&S type modes to get people taking photos, but to get the most from these cameras, you need to learn to take more control over the exposure. The large sensor allows for shallow depth of field that allows you to turn the guy drinking theBud into a blur so people concentrate on your subject. You can even choose large aperture lenses that can focus onthe eye and have some of the subjects face in softer focus. DSLRs can also produce depth of field, but itisn't automatic.

DSLRs allow you to change lenses to accomplish certain tasks. It is less convenient, but more flexible. DSLRs, I guess, allow better artistic expression, but requires more knowledge and work to get the most from the camera. Oh, and another factor, it costs much more when you start buying the lenses as you grow.
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