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Old May 4, 2007, 12:46 PM   #1
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I am just getting started in digital photography and currently am in the possession of (inherited) both a 5D and the S2. I am wondering about the relative quality of each. I only want to keep one. Are the advantages to one over the other? Any advice will be appreciated.
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Old May 4, 2007, 9:15 PM   #2
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I know this doens't help much but...... I would keep them both. With the S2 you have access to the F mount (lots of choices there.)andacameramany prefer for portraits andweddings.With the5D you have in camera AS and iso3200. It all comes down to what you shoot.
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Old May 5, 2007, 12:03 AM   #3
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Thank you for taking the time to answer. Could you take a little more time and explain why the S2 is good for portraits. Is it not as good as the 5D for pictures other than portraits. Actually, having been married twice, if I never see another wedding, I will die a happy man. The thought of taking wedding pictures makes my toes curl. On that basis, the 5D is the clear choice. When you say portrait, what does that mean -- does it mean pictures within a certain close distance or does it really mean portraits. Thanks for your time.
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Old May 5, 2007, 8:58 AM   #4
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The fuji S series is known for excellent dynamic range and color reproduction, especially in the rendering of skin tones. It is a camera of choice for many wedding and portrait photographers for this reason. The S2 is a bit more feature rich and pro level in build quality and control. The 5d has the advantage of anti shake built in and higher available ISO. For a day to day walkaround camera, the 5d should work well. If you need a bit more control and ruggedness, go with the S2. You could always keep the one you don't use all the time as a backup, but two different systems means more lenses, flashes and gear to keep.
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Old May 6, 2007, 2:01 PM   #5
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Thank you. That was very helpfu. I really appreciate your taking the time to help me.
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Old May 16, 2007, 9:19 PM   #6
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I cant speak on behalf of the Fuji.. I own the Maxxum 5d.. There are plentiful lenses and attachments that fit from old cameras as well as the new Sony. I know Konica Minolta are no longer dealing with cameras but Sony will fix and repair. Ive owned the DImage A2 as well as Dimage s414. I love the camera. the AS(antishake) is a really good plus especially if shaky hands. It takes great photos and I wish they never left the business
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Old May 16, 2007, 11:46 PM   #7
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Thanks! What lenses do you use on the 5D? That's another concern I have.
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Old May 17, 2007, 9:03 AM   #8
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I have a few lenses from my old camera , I had a Maxxum 7000i.. But any thing that will fit the maxxum/sony. I currently have on order and awaiting arrival Sigma 70-200 f/2.8 1/3 the cost of Sonys at the same range...waiting to see how good that lense is.. But Ive had other sigma and have been satisfied.
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Old May 17, 2007, 11:28 AM   #9
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rjseeney wrote:
Quote:
The S2 is a bit more feature rich and pro level in build quality and control.
I don't know about the build quality part. lol The forums around are full of stories about S2 Pros failing at the least opportune times (mostly sensor failures). Fuji has been fixing them at no charge, though, even if they're out of warranty (or at least they were).

Here's an old "sticky" thread about the issue (although the link I included does not seem to work anymore):

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=60

Now, to be fair, there is an issue that impacts some of the KM DSLR models, too. It's commonly referred to as FSB (First Shot Black). It tends to happen after the camera hasn't been used for a while, only for the very first shot. Turning the camera off and on again corrects it until the next time the camera has been sitting up for a while (i.e., usually days between use).

I think it boils down to the shutter mechanism sticking when the camera hasn't been used for a while.

The diagnostics performed by a service center will shown an "error 58", which is apparently related to how long the camera senses pressure on a roller cam in the shutter mechanism. Well, if it's sticking because it hasn't been used in a while, it may see pressure for too long. ;-)

Ditto if you have a bad connection, weak battery or other electrical issue. It wouldn't surprise me at all if a good cleaning is what's "really" fixing some of these cameras, versus the actual parts replacement.

The best analogy I can think of is a weak battery or bad connection in an Automobile. In that case, your starter may turn more slowly. Ditto if the car has been sitting up for a while (the engine's lubrication is not going to be as good then).

The difference with the camera is that the KM engineers decided to monitor for this condition (the error 58 that is shutting down the camera).

KM decided to change out a part along the way to reduce this binding condition. But, from my perspective, the issue is the way KM is monitoring the pressure. They probably should not have used a tolerance as tight as they do before shutting down the camera.

I've had this issue, too. The first time, I fixed it.. Well, it started doing it again quite a few months later (no problems for around 10 or 11 months after the first fix) and I used the same fix again and haven't seen the problem since.

The fix?

I cleaned all contacts (battery, battery contacts in camera, lens contacts on lenses and camera's lens mount).

Then, I shot a card full of images using continuous mode to heat up and loosen the shutter mechanism. My guess is that this procedure will keep it running fine for another 10 or 11 months or so. I should probably just do this about every 6 months and consider it a semi-annual tuneup.

But, you can get it fixed. The fix is using a different gear design for the shutter assembly. Some users have never seen the issue at all, and I think it's more due to the way they're monitor it versus any actual binding (which is why some users like me report cleaning all contacts has prevented it). See this service advisory about it (and Sony will fix it out of warranty via their third party service center in the U.S.). Parts availability has been sporadic. But, it appears to be improving some now.

http://ca.konicaminolta.com/informat...202/01_en.html

I've probaby got tens of thousands of images on my 5D's shutter. I've lost count of how many shutter actuations I have since I've reset it a few times.

I'm not about to send mine in for service for such a minor issue. Even if the cleaning wouldn't have solved it (and it does for mine), it only occurs after the camera has been sitting up for a while when users see it (that's why it's referred to as "First Shot Black", and power cycling the camera solves it for the rest of the day, or even for days at a time util it's been sitting for a long time without use (unlike the Fuji sensor failures which keep the camera from working at all until the sensor is replaced).

The S2 Pro is also a much slower camera compared to the KM 5D at write speed to media. For example, the S2 Pro tops out at less than 2MB/Second to faster CompactFlash cards like the Sandisk Ultra II or Lexar 80x. The KM 5D can write at around 7 to 8MB/Second to these same cards (and closer to 9MB/second to some of the newer cards). It can actually write at 1 raw frame/second *after* the buffer is full with newer cards (Extreme III, etc.) it's so fast writing to media. A larger buffer would be nice to have if you're shooting sports in raw (you can only buffer 5 to 6 frames at 3 frames per second in raw before it slows down to about 1 frame/second).

But, it's pretty darn fast as entry level models go, despite it's buffer size, especially if you're shooting jpeg with a newer Extreme III or similar card. It barely hiccups after the buffer is full and keeps on shooting at between 2 and 3 fps until the card is full). The higher end KM Maxxum 7D has a larger buffer. But, the newer 5D is much faster writing to media to help make up for it. The latest Sony DSLR-A100 (which is based mostly on the Maxxum 5D) is even faster writing to media (it can write at over 13MB/Second to an Extreme III). It's buffer isn't that large. But, nothing in it's price range even comes close to that kind of I/O speed to media.

As far as Dynamic Range, the S2 Pro is highly rated, and most users really like it's JPEGs.. It's also got very low noise levels at higher ISO speeds. The 5D produces more contrasty images by default shooting in jpeg and uses an odd tone curve. So, it's pretty easy to end up with clipped highlights if you're not very careful (and it's metering does take a bit of getting used to).

Shooting in raw, the 5D is excellent (I've yet to see any other newer entry level DSLR test better and I've been shocked at how overexposed a jpeg image can be shooting raw + jpeg, and yet the raw file is still recoverable with a decent raw converter). You can see some Imatest results here for things like Dynamic Range: The S2 Pro would probably beat it though (the newer S3 Pro is one of the few cameras that can if you shoot raw with a 5D).

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PROD...M5DIMATEST.HTM

As for lenses, the Fuji has an advantage in some areas, since Nikon has some nice lenses with AF-S (Silent Wave Focusing) available that work with it. I've not found myself wanting for lenses for what I shoot using a 5D, despite the lack of lenses that have a similar feature. Right now, only a few Sony/Minolta lenses are available with the same kind of feature as Nikon's AF-S (Silent Wave Focusing)

Sony and Minolta refer to it as SSM (Super Sonic Motor), and the few lenses that have it are absurdly priced. For example, Sony is getting around $2,500 for their 70-200mm f.2.8 SSM lens, and some of the older Minolta lenses (70-200mmn f/2.8G SSM, 300mm f.2.8G SSM), with this lens feature are very hard to find and *very* expensive.

So, if I were a sports shooter (I'm not), I'd take that into consideration. But, if I were a sports shooter, I wouldn't consider the S2 Pro to be adequate anyway (because of buffer size, write speed to media, etc.).

The Fuji also has some features that would be desirable for pro use. For example, it's got a PC Sync Port for external strobes. The Maxxum 5D doesn't (although I've got a third party adapter for my 5D's hotshoe that gives
me that feature).

One of the nicest thing about the 5D from my perspective is built in anti-shake for every lens. I value it. But, it may not be as important to some users.

My suggestion would be to use both cameras for a while before making a decision and see which one fits you the best.

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Old May 17, 2007, 12:23 PM   #10
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Wow. Thank you so much. You've pointed out things I would never known about. Can't thank you enough!
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