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Old May 19, 2007, 12:57 AM   #1
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I am rather new to digital SLR's but it has come time for me to purchase a quality digital camera. I need a digital camera to take high res close up photos of products for my website . I need to take pics of tiny items (like salt crystals) , crop and blow them up yet still have it look extremely sharp.

I currently own a Nikon n70film camera with a tamron 28-105 and 75-300 lens.

I was considering the populard40x and the canon XTI but then i found out thatmy lenses wont work on these cameras. Even then i wasn't sure what one to get . I really like the feel of the nikon but i liked the dust control feature of the canon. I then started looking at the nikon D80because i could use the lenses i already own on it.

other than my website needs I am a casual camera user but having a nice camera makes taking pictures way more fun so i don't mind spending a few bucks on it. I also take good care of my gear so itshould last me a long time.

This my string of questions .

1) are the includedkit nikon or canon lenses substantially better then the tamrons i own and i am better off getting the n40x or canon XTI with one of these lenses ?

2) other than the wider range of lenses available what are the other advantages of the n80 over the other two ?

3) I have seen a d40x with a few different lens kits, one with a 18-55 ($700), one with a 18-135($900) and one with 18-35 and a 55-200 ($975) . Are all of these good lenses ?

4) I have read a few places that the n80 is a waste and you might as well break yourself and get the n200 but they don't elaborateon why. is there any truth to this ?
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style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"5)if it was you and your $700-$1000 , what would you buy consideringmy uses?

a) Nikon d40x with 18-55 ($700)

b) Nikon d40x with 18-135 ($900)

c) Nikon d40x with 18-35 and a 55-200 ($975)

d) Nikon D80 and use the tamron lenses I already own ($900)

e) Canon XTI with 18-55 lens ($735)

f) Break yourself and get the n200 and use the tamron lenses ($1,150)

g) a better option I have overlooked



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Old May 19, 2007, 7:43 AM   #2
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Here's something else to consider. The Fuji dSLRs will work with your existing lenses as well, and they have quite a good reputation. From what I've heard about the Fujis, you might be better served by one of them instead of a Nikon or Canon.

I just thought I'd throw another monkey wrench into your decision making process. :roll:
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Old May 19, 2007, 9:38 AM   #3
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can you use the tamron lenses with the sonyDSLR-A100 ?
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Old May 19, 2007, 9:57 AM   #4
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TCav wrote:
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Here's something else to consider. The Fuji dSLRs will work with your existing lenses as well, and they have quite a good reputation. From what I've heard about the Fujis, you might be better served by one of them instead of a Nikon or Canon.

I just thought I'd throw another monkey wrench into your decision making process. :roll:
is there a model that you recommend ?

Ifound the Fuji Finepix S9100 which is (SLR like) and has a fixed 28-300 lens . ($382 at beach camera) . It is very possible this could suit my low level hobby needs and be capable of taking high quality close up photos for my website . big down fall is the lack of a remote trigger .

The only true Fuji SLR i see is the Fuji FinePix S5pro and that seems to be a bit out of my price bracket.


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Old May 19, 2007, 12:52 PM   #5
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Fuji S9100/9600 can take good hi-res macro, I don't have 9100, but used to have S9000/9500. It doesn't have a remote, but you can use an ordinary mechanical cable release with it or an air pump type release. Here are a few examples of macros taken with S9500:

This flower is about 2cm in diameter:



These are about 0.5 cm in diameter:



this was simply one of the first pics that I took with Fuji when I bought it :-):





S9100 is a nice capable digicam, it might suit your needs very well, but it's not a DSLR. The shooting rate, AF speed and low-light performance are not even close to DSLRs.

It doesn't really matter what DSLR you get, but to shoot hi-res close ups and macro you will need a macro lens, none of the zooms you have is a macro lens. If I were you I would break myself, kept the existing Tamron lenses and got a D80 + a 60mm Micro Nikkor lens to begin with. If the budget is tight, try to find a D50 or a used D70 and a macro lens. Just keep in mind that your lenses will be "longer" with a cropfactor of a DSLR. Your 28-105 will become a 42-157mm lens, which can be a bit long for shooting landscapes and indoor shots.

Just my $0.05.
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Old May 19, 2007, 1:43 PM   #6
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so those pics were taken with a out of the box s9000 , no additional accessories ?
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Old May 19, 2007, 1:50 PM   #7
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algold wrote:
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It doesn't really matter what DSLR you get, but to shoot hi-res close ups and macro you will need a macro lens, none of the zooms you have is a macro lens. If I were you I would break myself, kept the existing Tamron lenses and got a D80 + a 60mm Micro Nikkor lens to begin with. If the budget is tight, try to find a D50 or a used D70 and a macro lens. Just keep in mind that your lenses will be "longer" with a cropfactor of a DSLR. Your 28-105 will become a 42-157mm lens, which can be a bit long for shooting landscapes and indoor shots.

Just my $0.05.
this the macro lens ?

Nikon 60mm f/2.8D AF Micro-Nikkor Lens ($400)

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-60mm-Mic...984&sr=8-1
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Old May 19, 2007, 1:55 PM   #8
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Snarkys wrote:
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I currently own a Nikon n70film camera with a tamron 28-105 and 75-300 lens.
What do you see on the front of the Tamron 28-105mm? Is it the 28-105mm f/2.8? (using something like an 82mm filter size). Heavy, monster of a lens?

If so, it could come in handy for low light. It's not as sharp as the Tamron 35-105mm f/2.8. But, it would make a nice to have lens that's much brighter than most lenses you'll find at a reasonable price (although it's a bit large and heavy). If it's the constant f/2.8 Tamron 28-105mm, it's around 4 times as bright as most of the kit lenses by the time you zoom in much with one.

If it's the smaller and lighter f/4-5.6 model, it's not worth much.

Regardless of which one, I'd still get a "kit" lens that starts out a bit wider than 28mm if you go with a DSLR (since any lens you use on a Nikon DSLR is going to behave like it's around 50% longer). IOW, you'll want something starting out wider (you can only back up so much). ;-) Most of the kit lenses start out at around 18mm.

The Fuji models being mentioned so far (like the S9100) are not DSLR models. So, they can't use your existing lenses (if you care about that part). You'd need a Nikon or Fuji DSLR if you want to use your existing lenses.

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Old May 19, 2007, 4:30 PM   #9
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Snarkys wrote:
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so those pics were taken with a out of the box s9000 , no additional accessories ?
Just an out of the box S9000, no additional close-up lenses or macro attachments.

In super macro mode the camera can focus to 2cm, but the distortions are strong, 9MP resolution allows for cropping. Again, this camera is not a DSLR, but as far as advanced digicams go, it has a lot of controls and options. The only downside is slow shooting rate (painfully slow if you shoot RAW), in low light there is a lot of noise if you go to ISO800, ISO1600 is not really usable. On a positive side, this all-in-one camera will cost you about the same as a true 1:1 macro lens for a DSLR alone.

If you want to extend you selection of DSLR camera bodies you can look at the used Fuji S2 and S3 Pro, but they are not small cameras, this can be an advantage or a disadvantage for you.

If you want a cheaper but good quality macro lens you can check Sigma 50, 70 or 100mm macro lenses. And you are right, the Nikon 60mm f/2.8D AF Micro-Nikkor Lens was the lens I meant.

cheers,

Alex

PS. btw I use Canon 350D and quite happy with it :-)
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Old May 19, 2007, 11:50 PM   #10
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The main advantges the D80 has are better build and more complete controls, including 2 command dials and a status LCD on top. Image quality and performance will be about the same.

If you think the D80 is more than you need, you might try finding the older 6MP D50 used. There really aren't too many advantages of the D40 over the D50. If you have older lenses you want to use, the D50 would be a good place to start.

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