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Old May 19, 2007, 10:31 PM   #11
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Super-zoom do as well inside as compacts and better than some. Main downside to super-zooms is that they are the largest and heaviest of the P&S. The largest of the super-zooms is still a little smaller than the smallest of the DSLRs.

My K Z612 is narrower and shorter than my old K DC5000 2 MP 2x zoom camera. By the way that DC5000 is six years old and I shot a thousand pictures with it in a two week span last SEP and it just kept on "truckin".
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Old May 19, 2007, 11:00 PM   #12
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SDIX wrote:
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what is the difference between image stabilization and optical image stabilization?

So if the majority of the photos I am taking will be inside, doI want to stay away from the "superzoom" cameras?
Image stabilization involves using a balance mechanism within the lens portion of the camera. The camera detects movement of your hands and adjusts the lens in an effort to keep it in the same position while a picture is taken. Image stabilization is useful when you use a slow shutter speed only, when your hand shake is most likely to disturb a picture making it blurry.

IS is typically used in a low-light situation, such as indoors, or in the night, where less light is available and the camera requires a longer exposure time for a suitable image. However, you should know that by using IS, you will be using a slow shutter speed, and any movement on the subject's part will end up blurry.

There's another aspect you should consider for low-light photography, and that is ISO. ISO value is the sensitivity of the sensor used by the camera which captures the image. Increasing ISO increases sensor sensitivity, thus reducing required sensor exposure time and increasing shutter speed. The downside is higher ISO sensitivity results in poorer image quality (noisier images). Using a higher ISO will allow you to capture movement in low light more easily. IS would be of little use in capturing a low light image of a moving subject.

Ideally, we all would like a camera that has excellet ISO performance as well as IS. Sadly we haven't got there yet. Anyway, I would rank ISO performance in the following manner:

Fuji S6500FD
Sony H5
Sony H2
Canon S3 IS

Sony's H9 is reputedy a better ISO performer than its predecessors. But no expert review of this camera is out yet. So I am not sure.

If size is not a problem, the Fuji S6500FD is a fabulous performer (despite not having IS), with a 28mm wide angle lens (for landscapes and those tight group photos), manual zoom ring lens (for easier and quicker zooming), and a more powerful flash compared with the competition.
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Old May 19, 2007, 11:43 PM   #13
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hmmm the S3 IS keeps popping up everywhere I go as an option...

these are the 3 I am currently comparing. If anyone knows of another model that is comparable please let me know http://www.imaging-resource.com/CAMD...submit=Compare

the sony sounds like the best from that comparison... but I dont really know what most of that stuff means lol! No where in town carries a sony H(anything) that I can play with.
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Old May 20, 2007, 2:07 AM   #14
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As many people say, try the cameras out if you can. If you can borrow your sister's Canon S2 IS, shoot some pictures in Auto then look at your results. From what you say, this type of camera should suit you very well, and your sister's experience will help you get used to the Canon more quickly than the others. Although I chose the H5, I wouldn't recommend that you buyan H7 or H9without seeing and handling it. The differences in performance between the3 superzooms are small so any of them should give you pleasing results, good zoom, and manual control when you are ready for it. You won't be able to rely on the Auto mode for best result in low light conditions.

If you read all the user feedback reports on the three camera on the Dpreview and Amazon sites, you can pick out the relative weak points and strong points of the cameras. Just ignore the extreme views and take an average. The more research you do, the more likely that yourresults will match your expectations!




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Old May 20, 2007, 10:10 AM   #15
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I wish I lived somewhere that was big on photography, or at least just carried everything they had on their website.

I think Ill go by the camera shop again this week and see if he has replenished any of his stock yet.
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Old May 20, 2007, 2:09 PM   #16
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I just went to walmart to pick up a few items and decided to stop over at the electronics. They have completely remodeled our walmart so I hadnt had a chance to browse the cameras there yet. I was totally shocked to find they had the sony H7 when no one else in town has it on display.

So I played with it and I really liked the quality! I dont really know how to use it or the S3 IS yet but I played with them both taking shots of the same items from the same position and I much prefered the H7 from what I could take. The system is very different than Im use to, menus inside menus I think was one of the cons...

So if you were to pick between the S3 IS and the H7 for quality, which would you choose? I dont know if Ill get the H7, but I was very impressed.
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Old May 20, 2007, 8:03 PM   #17
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I went to target and played with theirs again. They had the H2 that I hadnt noticed last time, but I played with it and didnt like it quite as much as the H7. The more I play with the S3 IS the less I like it.

I also kinda liked the canon A630 they had, but its a little more basic than I was expecting to get.

I think I might be able to fix one of my kodaks, so Ill have a basic level P&S, that I know very well,to keep in my pocket or car. So Im thinking I want something with lots of options. Id LOVE to get a DSLR but I just cant afford one, so hmmmm which point and shoot will get me closest to DSLR quality without breaking $500(including accessories).


Also something I noticed today that I never noticed before was that the viewfinder and LCD screen are both electronic and not in real time. I of course expected that from the LCD screen, but didnt think that it would be in the viewfinder.

Is it a problem??
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Old May 20, 2007, 9:42 PM   #18
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SDIX wrote:
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Also something I noticed today that I never noticed before was that the viewfinder and LCD screen are both electronic and not in real time. I of course expected that from the LCD screen, but didnt think that it would be in the viewfinder.

Is it a problem??
The eye level and the LCD are both electronic in ALL super-zooms. Is that a problem, guess it depends what your expectations are but I almost always use the eye-level finder.
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Old May 20, 2007, 10:01 PM   #19
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if Im wanting as little lag as I can get in a P&S?

Ill mainly be taking snapshots of my 3yo's face probably, and you know how quickly they turn away.



Would I be better off getting a high quality P&S or the cheapest possible DSLR?


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Old May 21, 2007, 12:58 PM   #20
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The cheapest option (and within your budget) is one of the superzooms. You've had a look at some and it does help a lot. One of the superzooms will do most of what you want with the one built in lens. You should be able to get good pictures indoors with flash of your 3 year old, but its more difficult without flash.

There is no question that a entry level DSLR will do virtually everything for you with a lens of say 18 mm (wide angle) to 100mm ormore, but it will cost more than your $500 budget. You are finding it difficult to choose a non DSLR, it is much more difficult to choose a DSLR. There are few entry level DSLRs, but many, many lenses, and although the best buys are the camera with kit lens, you may want to buy better lenses in future. I think that if you buy a superzoom, this will serve you well, and eventually you may be motivated to buy a DSLR, but will have learnt a lot with the superzoom - my opinion only. So perhaps buy an "obsolete" superzoom, H5, S3-IS, Fuji S6500etc, and put some money away for the future DSLR? Having said that, below is a picture I took yesterday with the D40 + kit lens of a young relative. The sensitivity was ISO1000, and the H5 might approach the picture quality at ISO400. The picture is straight out of the camera.
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