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Old May 21, 2007, 10:31 PM   #21
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shutter_bug wrote:
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I heard that the lens included with the Pentax wasn't very good at all, so...
I have to disagee with your statement that the Pentax kit lens isn't very good - it's surprisingly good, especially considering the price. I could have replaced mine but I'm quite happy with it. It isn't the fastest lens in the world, but it can take lovely pictures.

A DSLR offers you things that p&s cameras can't, but it comes at a price. If you are interested in learning about photography, then get the dSLR (I happen to have Pentax K100and love it). You can add lenses later on, as you need them (for sports you'd definitely want a longer lens, but you don't have to buy it right away). It will ultimately cost more in the long run than a p&s camera, but what's even MORE expensive is to buy a p&s camera now, then replace it with a dSLR in a year or two.

The only difference between the K100 and K110 is SR. That's a personal issue - some people need it more than others. I've taken many wonderful pictures with a Pentax DS (no SR), so it isn't the end-all. Since you are looking to take pictures of fast-moving children, you'd probably want to use as fast a shutter speed as possible, and SR helps for slower shutter speeds to compensate for camera shake. A K110 could be a good fit for your use.

The Pentax K110 and K100 both (as doesany of the entry level dSLR cameras)have an auto mode. I've handed my K100 to my husband, who has absolutely no interest in photography and has never owned a camera in his life, and he's taken some really nice pictures with it. On the other hand, there are all kinds of adjustments you can make, so it can grow with your skills as you develop them.

That said, if your ultimate goal isn't to own a dSLR, then buy one of the more advanced p&s camera. They end up being cheaper and lighterin the long run.
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Old May 21, 2007, 10:49 PM   #22
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I dont mind the cost overtime... its the cost right now. I only have so much that I have set aside for right now and would like to be able to get what Id need for the next few years. When I invest in a DSLR I want to be more camera savvy and be able to invest in a GREAT DSLR instead of the cheapest one I can find.

So I suppose Im looking for DSLR quality and options in a P&S? to familiarize me with a more than basic camera and get me ready for a DSLR later on down the road.

sigh... I dont know what I want! Well I do, I want to learn what all this jargon means lol! That- I think- is my biggest issue, I just really dont understand the differences or options. I keep reading but it still doesnt make sense.
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Old May 22, 2007, 8:10 AM   #23
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hey! why don't you check out the olympus evolt E-330. it has everything you need and is pretty cheap. check out the review for the lenses as well. really, really great optics by Zuiko. it's the first dslr with a live view viewfinder. you may like what you see.

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Old May 22, 2007, 8:18 AM   #24
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SDIX wrote:
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sigh... I dont know what I want! Well I do, I want to learn what all this jargon means lol! That- I think- is my biggest issue, I just really dont understand the differences or options. I keep reading but it still doesnt make sense.
If you aren't sure what you want and what all the jargon means, I suggest a visit to your local library. Take out a book on general photography, an older book talking about the basics of film photography would work (especially if it has lots of examples). Read through it and get familiar with aperture and shutter speed, what happens when you change one or the other, along with what you'd see in the viewfinder with lensesof various focal lengths. If your head is still spinning, forget about the camera for a bit and let it digest before buying.
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Old May 22, 2007, 9:34 AM   #25
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Regarding the H9, the tilting LCD will allow you to get some shots you would not otherwise get,
The wireless remote is a very nice feature.
My two cents.
I still have and like very much my Kodak P712, but if I were buying new today, it would probably be the Sony H9. The only thing it is lacking that I currently have is the hot shoe for external flash.


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Old May 22, 2007, 1:57 PM   #26
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I have had a very good experience with the Nikon D-40, the kit lens is very good. To it I have added the SB-400 Flash and a Nikon 55-200mmVR lens which I was able to find for just $230. All in all it makes a very reasonably priced kit which produces great image quality and can even be used in an auto mode.

Like the OP, most of my photos are of children and the D-40 is very quick and small to use.

MT/Sarah
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Old May 22, 2007, 3:58 PM   #27
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Well I just got back from playing with more cameras. I went to every store in town and tried the ones they had that were on my list.

No one in town carries the Fuji s6000fd or the Panasonic FZ8 so I wasnt able to play with them.

I played with the nikon D40 and have definitely decided Im going to stick to P&S for the moment. The quality was awesome! It was very quick to shoot... but it took me 10 minutes just to figure out how to adjust it to snap a normal picture. So I think Ill get a fully loaded P&S and practice with it, get adjusted to adjusting things, then buy a good DSLR when I know what I am doing.

The camera I feel most drawn to is the H7, I tried the H9 but dont need the night or tilt screen... so since those are the only differences???

I think Ill ask over in the sony forum what people think of the H7 and what are some things to know about it before I buy.

Im not dead set that this is the camera Im getting, but its the one Im most drawn to. Of all the ones Ive played with it was the easiest for me to adjust,I love the face detection and red eye on when faces are detected setting.

Any more suggestions?
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Old May 22, 2007, 5:51 PM   #28
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SDIX wrote:
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Any more suggestions?
Go buy the camera and have fun taking pictures! Sounds like you've made a well-informed decision and now its time to go play.
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Old May 22, 2007, 6:03 PM   #29
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DSLR are not hard. They all have a green mode a P/S on the rotary Dial. Once set that way you all you do is hit the shutter button Zoom if you like just like a Point and Shoot. They even have an assisted manul mode where you get full auto but can override settings.

I am telling you from someone who started with P/S Cameras for the same purpose that you will not find the same quality in P/S as DSLR. Its all about the Sensor Size which translates into the abilty to get noise free images with higher light sensativity aka Higher asa value aka 400 or 800, even 1600, etc.

DSLR also all come with Recharable Batteries as do most higher end P/S.

The only thing you gain with P/S is zoom range. I do NOT believe the trade off is worth it but that choice is yours.

Some P/S do come with good optics to a point (though distortion is usually more then with dslr leneses as is purple fringing).

** But really you nailed it when you said you need speed to capture. Speed comes wiht a DSLR through a combination of the Camera's capabilites and fast lens coupled with the Abilty to usa higher ASAs. You simply can not do that with a P/S.

There are only a few reasons to go with a P/S Price and Size or their built in long zoom which in IMHO is a fools errand for that which you want to capture.

For those that need the long zoom with out later buying additonal lenses then I have no argument. We all photograph different things.

**** The reason I said take your time is that it is your purchase not ours. You have to be happy and comfortable. You also are stratleing a dividing line. One can also spend more on somthing... but a lot of the best DSLR with Kit Lens start $ about $700. The Rebel Xti, D40x. That is not to say there are not a lot of other great choices. You just need to keep in mind nothing is pefect. Everything has a design and price compromises. If you need to keep to under $600 you will need to research very carfully your needs.

With a Digicam the choice is even more important because you you defintely will bump into a Digicams limitations. None of them can match a DSLR but there are defintely better and worse ones at speed and image quality.

The memory card is a constant. a @2GB whether for Digi or DSLR is going to cost you $25-50 will capture 100s of images. I will not even get started on capturing raw images with JPEGS. That is again somthing you can only do effetively with a DSLR. You do this because you want to be able to make a major change to white balance or push the image lightening for a special photo.

With a DSLR you can capture both at high speed.

Lastly you asked about Image Stabilization (IS). Is it good yes. What it does is let you capture non flash shots in lower light with out blurring caused by camera shake. It DOES not help you capture a facial expression or a fast moving object because by definition you are shooting @ sub 1/60 of second aka 1/30 1/15 etc.

Image Stabilizaton can be lens or body based. I would not make my decession soly based on IS. Its nice but not really relevant in your case perse. If you do not have enough light your going to be using a flash.



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Old May 22, 2007, 6:46 PM   #30
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My first superzoom was the Olympus C2100. I was drawn to it because I loved the flexibillity it gave me - from close up shots to distant shots and everywhere in between. If you are drawn to the H7, go for it. In a year or two, when you have become more familiar with your photographic desires and some of the limitations of the H7 (if you discover any), you will be readier to choose a DSLR.

I agree with some of the other posters that you can use DSLR's in auto mode and get perfectly good pictures. In fact, sometimes, you can get outstanding pictures.

For me, one advantage of a good superzoom over an entry level DSLR with kit lens is zoom range. If you want to match the zoom range with a DSLR, you need to buy another lens. Of course, you can skipthe kit lens and buy a good 18-200 mm lens, but you you will end up paying another $300 or more.

One last advantage of some of the smaller superzooms is that you can sometimes get them into sports venues (stadiums, arenas, etc.) while the same is not usually true for DSLR,s.

You can studycamera buying options forever. Trust your instincts and go for what feels best for you.
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