Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 22, 2007, 7:02 PM   #31
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 73
Default

thank you, I really appreciate your time to help me.

I realize I have made my search way to hard! I need to remember when looking at my options that ANYTHING is going to be better than what I currently have(which is 2 broken kodaks that are outdated), but also that I am not looking for professional quality either. My kodak has been great to me, Ive been happy with the way it performs... so if the camera I pick performs even slightly better then I will be pleased. That said I do want a camera worth the money.

I dont see how I can afford a DSLR. I dont want to get the most basic model with little options and a minimal lense.If I could spare evena few more pennies, then I would, but $500 even is stretching it. I really should lower my budget to be honest, $400 for the camera and accessories would be more reasonable for me, or even if I could do it for $300 I would be ecstatic!(especially with the little one's birthday coming up in a month).

I loved the H7 when I played with it those 3-4 different times, but I think Ive gotten caught up in my search a little too much. I think Im going to go back one more time and give the A630 and A710 another try to see if something like that might suit me betterfor now.
SDIX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 22, 2007, 8:29 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Mount Shasta, California
Posts: 1,525
Default

I have been in the same dilema for some time. Have the Fuji F30 for low light. Looking at the Panasonic FZ8 for a load of features including RAW or going for the K100D with the 18-250 lens, the closest equivelant to the best point and shoot zoom. First, let's look at the numbers. The Fuji cost $200 with rebate. The FZ8 can be had for under $300. Question? Should I carry two cameras that give me similar DSLR capabilties for $500, or should I bite the bullet and go for the DSLR? The Pentax K100D is under $400 and the 18-250 lens is $500, and that's just getting to point and shoot zoom. For low light with the K100D, you will have to spend another, let's see how can I avoid controversy, at least $300 for a zoom 2.8 lens, and that's not nearly enough according to those who live and die by buying the latest and greatest. Total for the DSLR, $1,200. I am reminded by a great photographer that the DSLRs are not digital, but mechanical with the mirror slap. As long as we buy the lenses, camera makers will continue to retard the development of true digital cameras.
pboerger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23, 2007, 9:40 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 822
Default

SDIX:
Take a closer look at some of the cameras on Steve's best list:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/best_cameras.html

On your budget you don't really need the latest and greatest. Moreover, something many around here will tell you, which most consumers don't know, is that more megapixels is not better, especially in these smaller sensor digicams. For your purpose, indoor shooting, last year's older 6MP models will often be better than the latest 8MP or 10MP model, in addition to easier on your pocket.

If you like the H7, be sure to check out the older 6MP H2:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_reviews/h2.html
The Kodak Z612 is a very capable 6MP model available for under $230:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_reviews/z612.html
And, for near DSLR image quality all the way up to ISO 800, and some DSLR like controls (manual focus and zoom rings available), I like the Fuji S6000/S6500, which is available at several of the retailers listed at near $300 before the $50 rebate:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2007_...i_s6000fd.html

Like pboerger, I have a Fuji F30, which uses the same sensor as the S6000. There's no way I could replace it with a DSLR--not unless they make one that will fit in my pocket. For the kind of indoor shooting you are talking about, IS would be nice in some cases, but what you really want is a faster shutter speed, which requires higher ISO shooting. The better option is often to use flash, but even there, being able to use ISO 400 will give you 4x as much range on your flash as ISO 100.

Here's a recent article of interest on high ISO shooting:
http://www.dpreview.com/articles/compactcamerahighiso/

You can see that DSLRs have a huge advantage here because of a much larger sensor. I'll add that even the cheapest entry level DSLRs are loaded with features compared to the digicams. You really aren't giving up much on an entry level DSLR. On a budget, an older discontined model will do. Really, this is similar to the digicams, except that with the DSLRs your paying an extra $300 for the latest and greatest small improvements rather than an extra $150.

I do think I'd think twice about spending in the $500 range for a superzoom (unless you really want the long end of the zoom) when you can get a DSLR for near that price. In many ways the superzooms can be more convenient, smaller and easier to handle, and in good light often deliver nearly as good results. But in my view, the difference between a $250 digicam and the latest $400 model isn't that great. The jump to a DSLR is much bigger, but the biggest differnce is often features and controls moreso than image quality. The image quality advantage is there, but mostly noticeable in more difficult lighting situations (like indoors).

kenbalbari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23, 2007, 10:03 AM   #34
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 73
Default

apparently the newer H7 and H9 are having issues?? maybe because they are too new and still have kinks??

I can NOT find the fuji s6000fd anywhere! It was the only one on my list I didnt get to play with.

Ill look again at the H2/H5. Is the only difference between themthe 1mp and the LCD screen size? That was all I could tell by comparing the options. Steve has the H5 over the H2.
SDIX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2007, 1:26 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 822
Default

Yes, the H5 has a much nicer screen, and 1 more MP. Beyond that any differences are minor.

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_reviews/h2_pg5.html
Quote:
The H2 also represents a good value versus the H5; for about $100 less, you give up only 1-megapixel of resolution and the larger higher resolution LCD.


http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonyh5/page15.asp
Quote:
The choice when looking at this class of camera is a difficult one, and one that more often than not comes down to handling, personal preference (in terms of the actual output) and how important certain specific features (in this case the screen, basically) are to you. The H2 represents far better value for money than the H5, which is why I still consider it to be the pick of the bunch, but the H5 still offers an awful lot of 'bang for your buck'. Whilst it would be unfair to penalise the H5 simply because it doesn't offer a lot more than the H2 in terms of real benefits, I would point out that whereas the $399 H2 was an easy choice for a Highly Recommended, the H5, like the Canon S3 IS, was a much closer call.
The nicer screen is worthwhile, but if the price difference is still around $100 it might not be worth it. The extra MP really isn't helping much because it means the H2 ends up being a bit better at high ISO, which you would want for those indoor shots.

I don't really know much about the H7 and H9 yet, but if there are issues there I wouldn't be surprised if they were from cramming 8MP onto a 1/2.5" sensor. I think most 8MP cameras so far have used a larger sensor than that. On the other hand, the H5 did pretty well with 7MP on a sensor that size, so maybe they can do 8MP well enough by now.

kenbalbari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2007, 10:10 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 133
Default

robbo wrote:
Quote:
One last advantage of some of the smaller superzooms is that you can sometimes get them into sports venues (stadiums, arenas, etc.) while the same is not usually true for DSLR,s.
I've had the opposite happen. I was at an event and they were prohibiting cameras withvideo capability. I had my DSLR with me and answered no... they didn't really check and I'm not sure the people working the gates always know the difference, but on most cameras it's petty easy to tell and I believe all the decent P&S cameras have video capability. DSLRs were OK as long as you didn't walk in with monster looking lenses.
Gozinta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2007, 10:55 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 133
Default

pboerger wrote:
Quote:
First, let's look at the numbers. The Fuji cost $200 with rebate. The FZ8 can be had for under $300. Question? Should I carry two cameras that give me similar DSLR capabilties for $500, or should I bite the bullet and go for the DSLR?
Quote:
I rave about myFuji, butit doesn't come close tomy DSLRs, neither will the FZ8.The Fuji handles noise pretty well if not thebest out there but it's still a small sensor. Of course the zoom range of the F30 is very limited. The FZ8has better range but if itis like the rest of the Panasonic "Noise Monster" line than you will be limited to great results in good lighting conditions.I have heard that it's noise reduction works better than prior models butthere is some loss of detail. My adviseif you want to stay in the P&S models is to keep the Fuji andfind an Ultrazoom other than the FZ8. There are plenty of ex-Panasonic users here whosimply gave up on the low light results of the FZ line. I had an FZ30 and was OK with soe shots up to ISO 400 butmany wouldn't shoot over 200 ISO.
Quote:
I am reminded by a great photographer that the DSLRs are not digital, but mechanical with the mirror slap. As long as we buy the lenses, camera makers will continue to retard the development of true digital cameras.
Quote:
I'm not quite sure if your friend's point is that having a mechanical shutter wth mirror slap is a drawback, but being able to see through the lens to most shootersis still an advantage. Statingthat DSLRs are not digital is just plain hogwash. Digital cameras are defined by the medium used to capture the image and the end result, which in either camerais a digital image. If we were to believe that having a mechanical shutter and mirror makes a DSLR not digital than we might as well say that as long as there are any mechanical parts in a camera than it can't be called digital. For example: P&S camera have a mechanical lens iris therefore they must not be digital.
Gozinta is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:34 AM.