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Old May 25, 2007, 6:05 PM   #1
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Hello,



My son will shortly be turning 16 years old and we will be buying himhis owndigital camera. Hehas recently startedusing my Sony H1 and is very much enjoying the 12x optical and the cameras other features but complains about shutter lag. He put together a nature journal for a class project and did an excellent job of taking many outdoor pictures. I was going to move ahead and purchase a Sony H2 but I have read many interesting reviews on the Cannon S3IS. I'm wondering if anyone has any opinions as to which camera may be better suited for a young, new user. I also understand the new Cannon S5 will be out shortly so I'm guessing the price of the S3 may drop closer to the current price of the Sony H2.



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MJW
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Old May 25, 2007, 8:29 PM   #2
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I'd look at the Sony H5 or the Canon S3...both would be good learning cameras & have good response times.
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Old May 25, 2007, 10:32 PM   #3
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You should also consider the Fuji S6500FD (S6000FD in some countries).

Much better at low light (non flash) photography compared with the S3 and H5.
Wider angle lens starting at 28mm.
Manual zoom ring lens for quicker, more accurate zooming
More powerful flash compared with the competition
Face detection

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/fu...6000fd-review/


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Old May 26, 2007, 12:23 PM   #4
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Shahmatt,



Had not looked at Fuji products. This camera certainly looks impressive, especially the optics. One questionI have on the Fuji is image stabilazation. My son takes many outdoor nature pictures using 12x optical or higher digital zoom. Can the Fuji picture stabilization be set for any mode or is it a separate mode?



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MJW
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Old May 26, 2007, 1:12 PM   #5
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The image stabilization in the F6000fd is accomplished simply by increasing the ISO setting so that the shutter speed also increases. This reduces blur from 2 sources - 1. the shaking of the camera in the hands of the picture taker 2. the movement of whatever you are photographing. The downside is that there is increased "noise" in pictures taken at higher ISO's. However, in some of the latest Fuji cameras, the F20, the F30, F31, and S6000fd, the picture quality at ISO's 800 and 1600 is still pretty good. If your son is taking pictures of still objects at full zoom in good light, the F6000fd might be a good choice. If he is taking them at full zoom in low light, hmmmm, I don't know. If you get a chance, read the reviews for this camera on this site and the one previously mentioned at www.dcresource.com
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Old May 26, 2007, 1:48 PM   #6
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I think your son would most likely prefer a camera with image stabilization over something like the Fuji that just has good high ISO performance, but here's a breakdown of the strengths and weakness of the two methods:

Image Stabilization:
Strengths: simple to use, excellent for very long telephoto, higher quality non-action shots (landscapes, still lifes, etc...) in lower light
Weaknesses: can't compensate for subject movement so only partially useful for action shots at long telephoto and not useful at shorter range, stabilizer needs a steady hand to truly work properly

High ISO:
Strengths: compensates for both subject movement and camera shake so is more effective for action shots, and better capable of taking candid shots of people in lower light
Weaknesses: more difficult to learn to use effectively, noisier or less detailed looking images (when using higher ISO settings), and may need to turn up the ISO at longer telephoto even when lighting isn't that dim

So basically, if you're shooting things like flowers at dusk, museum exhibits, night scenes and long telephoto shots in decent light, the stabilizer will tend to get higher quality photos. If you're shooting sports, candid shots indoors and animals in motion, higher ISO will get better shots.

If your son is using the long telephoto a lot, that is why I'd favor the stabilizer. At around 400mm equivalent, the stabilized camera would be able to shoot in the 1/15-1/30 range, where without you'd probably need to use something more like 1/200-1/400 in the same light, and that would mean using ISO 800-1600 so the stabilized camera would have significantly cleaner images.
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Old May 29, 2007, 9:42 AM   #7
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Thanks all for your feedback. While I'm really intriqued by the Fuji, most likely I will buy him the Canon S3 because of all it's features and the "fun factor" described in several reviews such as color swaps. Also hoping for a price drop when the new S5 hits the market.



MJW




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