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Old Jun 15, 2007, 10:41 AM   #1
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Can someone please help me??? I am looking for the best digital camera to provide me the following:
  • Image Stabilization [/*]
  • Long-range Zoom [/*]
  • Great focus (especially indoor) [/*]
  • Good for Low Light (indoor) Photography [/*]
  • Super Macro Zoom [/*]
  • Rotating View Finder[/*]
I have owned an Olympus C-770 (no image stablization) and a Canon S3 IS (not the best for low light/indoor focus).

I enjoy photographing insects and flowers using the super macro mode, unusual angles with the rotating view finder, and birds with the long-range zoom.

Any and all suggestions is most appreciated!!! I've read numerous reviews and can't seem to find one camera that offers all that I want.:?

Thank you.
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 10:44 AM   #2
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It seems to me that you've reached the limit of what can be done with a P&S.

Have you considered getting a dSLR?
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 10:46 AM   #3
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I'm an amateur and don't have any experience with them...what would you suggest?
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 11:49 AM   #4
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First, a dSLR is going to be expensive. Any dSLR body, without a lens, will cost more than any of the P&S digicams you mentioned. But the wide variety of lenses are going to make everything you said you wanted to do, not just possible, but easy.

Take a look at the dSLRs onhttp://www.steves-digicams.com/best_cameras.html. Remember that the lens is a big part of what makes a good quality image, so the more expensive cameras won't necessarily give you better images than the less expensive ones.

I will mention that the very best lenses come from 4 companies: Canon, Nikon, Leica (on Panasonic digicams), and Zeiss (on Sony digicams). Unlike with cameras, expensive lenses will almost always give you better images, but some of these lenses go for several thousand dollars. So you need to figure out how much you want to spend.
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 11:52 AM   #5
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Wow, I didn't realize how expensive lenses can be. I'm really not ready to invest that kind of money yet. Perhaps I should wait a while for new technology in the P&S cameras...what do you think?
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 12:11 PM   #6
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crao wrote:
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Wow, I didn't realize how expensive lenses can be. I'm really not ready to invest that kind of money yet. Perhaps I should wait a while for new technology in the P&S cameras...what do you think?
I didn't mean to scare you off! There are plenty of good lenses for $100-$200! But none of them will do everything you want, so you'll end up buying more than one lens. But that's the beauty of an SLR: you can get lenses that are specialized for a particular purpose, and they will be much better for that purpose than anything connected to a P&S.

Take a look at the reviews, narrow down your choice of brands, and explore the forums for those brands. Once you understand better how these dSLR things work, you will be better prepared to make your decision.

And remember that a lot of very good dSLRs and lenses are available used, so that will save you some money too.
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 12:18 PM   #7
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Sorry...I guess I did get a little scared:lol:. I know you probably don't want to suggest a particular brand/style...BUT, since you seem to have experience, if YOU were inMY shoes, which camera/kit would YOU buy as your first dSLR??? Don't worry, I'm trying to get advice fromMANY "experts!" It's such a hard decision to make, especially since I know NOTHING about dSLRs and there are so many opinions/forums.

Thank you so much!!!
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 12:43 PM   #8
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Before I bought my first dSLR, I started by reading the reviews and seeing what other people had to say.

Let me make a few general statements about the brands you'll see, so you can get started. I don't think anyone will disagree with any of them.

1. Canon and Nikon have the largest selection of lenses (with the exception of the Nikon D40 & D40x).

2. The best lenses are made by Canon, Nikon, Leica (Panasonic) and Zeiss (Sony).

3. Olympus makes the lightest, most compact dSLRs and lenses.

4. Sony, Pentax and the high-end Olympus have image stabilization in the camera body, while Canon and Nikon have image stabilization only in certain lenses.

5. Cameras that use the more common flash memory card formats (CF & SD)will have the highest capacity, fastest and cheapest memory cards.

6. Canon, Nikon and Sony (Minolta) have more lenses on the used market than the other brands.

7. The best choice for youwill be the camera you feel most comfortable using. Before you decide which one you'll buy, you need to narrow down your selection, and then try them out. See which ones you feel the most comfortable holding.See which ones have the important controls where you naturally expect to find them. Then, and only then, should you make your choice.

Anybody else?

Did I leave out anything?
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 12:50 PM   #9
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crao-

To determine more about your choices and photo environment, please do us a fovor won't you:

(1) Tell us what kind of light environment the majority of your photo will be taken in, for example, do you mid using flash, or do you prefer photos taken inside without flash (a rather difficult environment for most cameras)? How many or what percentage of your photos will be taken out of doors?

(2) Take a look at these camera, and see if they seem to meet your requirement:

Canon S-3IS

Panasonic FZ-8

Kodak Z-712

(3) How much budget are you allowing for this camera?

With some answers to those questions, we will have a better graspyour kind of photo environment you are dealing with, and if any of the ultrazoom cameras that have been suggested might work for you.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 1:52 PM   #10
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I neglected to mention that dSLRs don't have rotating viewfinders, but they do have rotating angle viewfinders available at an extra cost.

An example of what I'm talking about is here [http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/...uctId=11040817]]
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