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Old Jun 18, 2007, 7:57 AM   #1
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Old Jun 18, 2007, 8:07 AM   #2
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Most dSLRs don't offer that feature because the mirror is in the way and the image sensor only senses the image when the shutter release is fully depressed.

To my knowledge, there is only one exception to that. Olympus has two new dSLRs, the E-510 and the E-410, that have that feature.

If what you're looking for is to be able to view the image before you take the shot, but not have your eye to the viewfinder, there are angle view finders for most dSLRs that will do that. You might look at []http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&a mp;langId=-1&productId=11040817] to see if soemthing like that would meet your needs.

I have one and use it a lot for macro work, and anything I use my tripod for (I'm taller than my tripod.)
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Old Jun 18, 2007, 8:20 AM   #3
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AnotherDSLR that currently offers live view from the image-capture sensor is the Canon 1DsMkIII. But it's fairly pricey. :blah:




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Old Jun 18, 2007, 8:35 AM   #4
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abby_i wrote:
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While I'm sure photos may turn out better this way, it's inpractical for the situations I take photos in. The ability to be able to take photos via viewing them through the LCD is vital.
just wondered what situation could be impractical for holding camera to your eye

anayway olympus do one but as u would expect its pricey for having this feature

there is also a gizmo that u can attach to the eyepiece of most dslrs called zigview that gives the view via a small lcd screen the latest version as detachable lcd screen on extension lead its only $469 cheaper versions are about $200

bear that in mind when olympus e330 with live view is $1000

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Old Jun 18, 2007, 9:56 AM   #5
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TCav wrote:
Quote:
Most dSLRs don't offer that feature because the mirror is in the way and the image sensor only senses the image when the shutter release is fully depressed.

To my knowledge, there is only one exception to that. Olympus has two new dSLRs, the E-510 and the E-410, that have that feature.

If what you're looking for is to be able to view the image before you take the shot, but not have your eye to the viewfinder, there are angle view finders for most dSLRs that will do that. You might look at []http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&a mp;langId=-1&productId=11040817] to see if soemthing like that would meet your needs.

I have one and use it a lot for macro work, and anything I use my tripod for (I'm taller than my tripod.)
Panasonic also offers it in their DMC-L1, but it is much too expensive as far as I'm concerned.
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Old Jun 18, 2007, 10:04 AM   #6
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Reanimator wrote:
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just wondered what situation could be impractical for holding camera to your eye
Shooting at low angles close to the ground.

Shooting over the heads of a crowd

Shooting over fences or other obstructions.

Shooting from a high position to reduce distortion. A fully extended pro tripod will require a step latter to use an eye level viewfinder. My tilt all goes to 7 feet and I have seen them taller.

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Old Jun 18, 2007, 10:08 AM   #7
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The more I read the threads on this forum the more fascinated I have become with the comments made about the SLR viewing system. Yes they have an advantage for fast action shooting. But not all photography is sports and wildlife. The DSLR's made today would not qualify as "Professional" cameras by the standards of 20 years ago because of the limitations of the modern DSLR viewfinder. Ie. Not interchangeable. (No waist level finders, action finders etc). Many do not have interchangeable view screens and the screens are small screen with less than 100% view of the final image. All of which can be made up for with LCD live viewing.


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Old Jun 18, 2007, 10:56 AM   #8
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tjsnaps wrote:
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The DSLR's made today would not qualify as "Professional" cameras by the standards of 20 years ago because of the limitations of the modern DSLR viewfinder. ...
I don't necessarily agree with that.


tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
... Ie. Not interchangeable. ...
Actually, 20 years ago, onlya handful of "Professional" SLRs had interchangeable viewfinders.

tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
... (No waist level finders,...
I'll concede that point.

tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
... action finders...
These are available, albeit from third parties.

tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
... Many do not have interchangeable view screens ...
Actually, most do, either from the manufacturers or from third parties. And since none of todays dSLRs have interchangeable viewfinders, swapping focusing screens is a daunting task, but the same could be said for many of the "Professional" SLRs 20 years ago.

tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
... and the screens are small screen with less than 100% view of the final image. ...
Not so. Todays dSLRs have viewfinders that provide at least a95% to 98% view of the final image, but the same was true of the "Professional" SLRs 20 years ago. And there are a number of dSLRs that have a 100% view.

tjsnaps wrote:
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... All of which can be made up for with LCD live viewing.
Wait until you try manual focus using a 230,000 pixel LCD viewfinder.

Wait until you try adjusting the aperture for a particular depth of field using a 230,000 pixel LCD viewfinder.

Wait until you try burst shots with an LCD viewfinder. (You may not have noticed it, but your LCD viewfinder goes black when you take a shot, and takes a while to come back. A dSLR allows you to compose between shots as soon as the mirror returns. Most dSLRs allow you to take 3 shots per second, and some as much as five. The LCD display takes 2-3 seconds to refresh after each shot, so bursts are shot blind if at all.)

Just because you don't need to do these things doesn't mean other professionals (and even some amatures) don't.

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Old Jun 18, 2007, 11:43 AM   #9
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TCav wrote:

tjsnaps wrote: The DSLR's made today would not qualify as "Professional" cameras by the standards of 20 years ago because of the limitations of the modern DSLR viewfinder. ...

TCav replied:
I don't necessarily agree with that.

You don't have to agree… the standards I'm referring to were the standards set by the reviewers of the time and the manufacturers themselves and the working pro's that used them. So it's true weather you agree or not.


tjsnaps wrote: ... Ie. Not interchangeable. ...


TCav replied:
Actually, 20 years ago, only a handful of "Professional" SLRs had interchangeable viewfinders.

No….. Only a handful of SLR's had interchangeable viewfinders….The professional one.

tjsnaps wrote: ... (No waist level finders, ...


TCav replied:
I'll concede that point.

Thank you

tjsnaps wrote: ... action finders ...


TCav replied: These are available, albeit from third parties.

Cool that I have not seen

tjsnaps wrote: ... Many do not have interchangeable view screens ...


TCav replied:
Actually, most do, either from the manufacturers or from third parties. And since none of todays dSLRs have interchangeable viewfinders, swapping focusing screens is a daunting task, but the same could be said for many of the "Professional" SLRs 20 years ago.

I'll give you this I can't know everything about every model

tjsnaps wrote: ... and the screens are small screen with less than 100% view of the final image. ...


TCav replied:
Not so. Todays dSLRs have viewfinders that provide at least a 95% to 98% view of the final image, but the same was true of the "Professional" SLRs 20 years ago. And there are a number of dSLRs that have a 100% view.

95%to98% is not 100% the Nikon F, F2, F3, F4 etc. all had 100% as did the canon A1 I believe. Non pro models such as the Nikon FM had 98% , 95% was only found on the cheapest models

tjsnaps wrote: ... All of which can be made up for with LCD live viewing.

TCav replied:
Wait until you try manual focus using a 230,000 pixel LCD viewfinder.

I have…and your right it takes more time and effort

TCav replied:
Wait until you try adjusting the aperture for a particular depth of field using a 230,000 pixel LCD viewfinder.

A mute point until they put bigger censers in them

TCav replied:
Wait until you try burst shots with an LCD viewfinder. (You may not have noticed it, but your LCD viewfinder goes black when you take a shot, and takes a while to come back. A dSLR allows you to compose between shots as soon as the mirror returns. Most dSLRs allow you to take 3 shots per second, and some as much as five. The LCD display takes 2-3 seconds to refresh after each shot, so bursts are shot blind if at all.)

True but not relevant.. As I said not all photographers are sports or wild life photographers. You can't take burst shots on a 4X5 view camera either but you will find that these are still widely used by working pro's

TCav replied:
Just because you don't need to do these things doesn't mean other professionals (and even some amatures) don't.

Again true … but not all

Most pro's have different camera's for different needs. No one camera can do it all.

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Old Jun 18, 2007, 12:23 PM   #10
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Funny, but how does any of this banter back and forth about wether or not a DSLR without live previewhelp the original poster with his original question?

Since we know that there are now DSLRs out there with live preview,if someone feels that itis an important, must have feature,they no longer have to limit themselves to settling for a point and shoot superzoom. They can now have the best of both worlds so long as one of the current models with live preview meets their needs.


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