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Old Aug 5, 2007, 5:08 AM   #1
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Hello All,

I went to a store today looking for SLR.

After spending a good hr there. (New to SLR). He recommand me

Nikon D40 with 18-55mm kit ($ 640.00 Cdn)

or

Nikon D80 with 18-70mm kit $ 1340.00 (cdn) ( if I willing to spend extra $$ for better option)

And also purchase 55 - 200mm VR (340.00 cdn)will cover to what I need for now.

Is that a goodcombination ?

I see some other store selling the D80 with a 18-135mm as kit (same $).

And I search the internet, people say the 18-70 mm is much better. Since the 18 - 135 is not VR and is not well build than the 18-70 mm. Is that true.

If I go for the D80, should I get the 18-70 mm or the 18-135 mm

Since I am getting the 55 - 200 mm VR with the camera D40 or D80

Or getting the D40 kit and 55 - 200 mm VR and save myself $ 700.00

Or should I look into just purchase the body and go with a 18 - 200 mm VR pnly.



And should I look into the Canon rebel XTI too.



Thanks !

Guppies
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Old Aug 5, 2007, 9:14 AM   #2
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guppies-

A good deal of your decision has to do with:

(1) what kind of photos you take
(2) how many super size (greater than 8" X 10) prints you make
(3) how much cropping you do
(4) if you need more than 6mp to work with

The D-40 is an excellent camera, the D-80 adds more features and more mp, as does the Canon XTi. So the first question to be answered is how many mp do you need in your camera? If 6mp is sufficient, then consider the Nikon D-40 and the Pentax K-100, which would give you camera boy IS which Pentax calls SR, or shake reduction. The SR in the camera body allows you to use non stabilized lenses with ease and save some cash. Keep in mind that as you add mp there will also be a small increase in noise. Moving upstream, there are the D-80 and the Canon XTi to consider, but you also might want to consider the Sony Alpha A-100, which would gives camera body stabilization, just like the Pentax K-100.

The Nikkor 18-55mm kit lens is quite good, better in fact than the Canon XTi's kit lens. The Nikkor 18-70mm lens was the so called kit lens for the D-70 camera. It is also a good lens. The Nikkor 18-135mm lens was the kit lens for the D-80, when the D-80 was introduced. It is a good lens, it is very sharp, but it has its detractors. The Nikkor 55-200mm lens is quite good, as well as being an economical second lens.

Most folks purchasing the D-40 go with the kit lens, the Nikkor 18-55mm, and add the Nikkor 55-200mm lens to complete the kit. That will work quite well for most folks, but it is not suitable for wildlife and bird photography, where there is the need for 300 and 400mm lenses.

You did not mention it, but you should probably figure in the cost of an external flash such as the SB-600 or SB-800. Some folks like the smallness of the SB-400, and it is handy. However, while it tilts, it does not swivel.

I am sure others will mention other options, features, and decision points, but this should be sufficient to get the discussion started.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 5, 2007, 10:04 AM   #3
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The Nikons you mentioned are good cameras. They would be good choices. Just as a side note, the D40 has been replaced recently with the D40x. While I'm not a nut about mega-pixels, the jump from 6 to 10 is noticeable, and they have done a good job keeping dynamic range in the change. If you will ever print larger than 8x10, consider this also.

You may consider the XTi, but look for solution outside of the 18-55 kit lens. Its not so hot.

Just to add more fuel to the uncertainty, I'll mention two other choices. Pentax and Olympus.

The Pentax offers allot of camera for the buck. I'm not the best source of information, but I'm certain others will chime in.

Olympus has a new DSLR, the E510, that can be purchased with two kit lenses. One is the 14-42, the other is a 40-150. They are great lenses to start off with, and are among the best of the kit lenses. The 2x multiplier (to get 35mm equivalent field of view) would mean the coverage would be about identical to the Nikon + two lenses. The E510 has in body stabilization (vs the Nikon/Canon lens based) which would mean you don't have to purchase more expensive lenses to get stabilization. Pentax and Sony also have stabilization in the camera body too.

The main downside to the Olympus system is the size ot the view of the viewfinder. Sony and Pentax are the best in the entry level IMHO.

Now for something VERY important. Handle the cameras to see how they fit you. If you are going to be using it for a couple hours, the camera has to be comfortable to be bearable.

Sorry to add to the confusion.




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Old Aug 5, 2007, 12:09 PM   #4
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In all honesty, the only reason I could see for buying the D40 or d40xover any of the other cameras mentioned here is money. If money isn't an issue - any of the other entry level cameras is going to be a better camera. And, the D80 is an outstanding mid-range camera.

Besides not having a focus motor (whichprevents about 2/3 of the available lenses for the Nikon system from autofocusing) the d40 also has a reduced number of focus points (only 3).

There isn't a real benefit to the d40 over the others except in the cost department. So, if you can afford one of the other cameras mentioned - they're all more feature rich and in the case of the D80 and XTi you'll have a huge arsenal of potential lenses to buy - both from Canon/Nikon and from third party manufacturers. So you'll have lots of options from budget third-party lenses (the very types of lenses that won't autofocus on the D40) to professional quality optics from Canon/Nikon.

Pentax and Olympus also offer some great cameras that are very feature rich. Just make sure whatever camera and system you buy into offers you the features YOU want and need not what we here tell you that you need. You'll get some folks that tell you high ISO performance is a must so buy a certain camera. Or, in body stabilization is critical so buy this camera. Or that an upgrade path to pro level cameras is important so buy that camera. My advice is to be weary of people that tell you a certain feature is critical without knowing what you intend to shoot. Remember, everything comes at a cost - sometimes that cost is in $$$ and sometimes it is in something you lose out on by not buying a different camera or a different system.

Having said that - is there a specific area or areas of photography that interest you? If so, there may be certain features that are important or very beneficial to have. No one camera or system is the best at everything - they all have their strengths and weaknesses. So, specifics about what you intend to shoot could make certain cameras / systems a better match to your needs.

I agree with the suggestion to handle the cameras.
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Old Aug 5, 2007, 4:23 PM   #5
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mtclimber wrote:
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guppies-

A good deal of your decision has to do with:

(1) what kind of photos you take
(2) how many super size (greater than 8" X 10) prints you make
(3) how much cropping you do
(4) if you need more than 6mp to work with

The D-40 is an excellent camera, the D-80 adds more features and more mp, as does the Canon XTi. So the first question to be answered is how many mp do you need in your camera? If 6mp is sufficient, then consider the Nikon D-40 and the Pentax K-100, which would give you camera boy IS which Pentax calls SR, or shake reduction. The SR in the camera body allows you to use non stabilized lenses with ease and save some cash. Keep in mind that as you add mp there will also be a small increase in noise. Moving upstream, there are the D-80 and the Canon XTi to consider, but you also might want to consider the Sony Alpha A-100, which would gives camera body stabilization, just like the Pentax K-100.

The Nikkor 18-55mm kit lens is quite good, better in fact than the Canon XTi's kit lens. The Nikkor 18-70mm lens was the so called kit lens for the D-70 camera. It is also a good lens. The Nikkor 18-135mm lens was the kit lens for the D-80, when the D-80 was introduced. It is a good lens, it is very sharp, but it has its detractors. The Nikkor 55-200mm lens is quite good, as well as being an economical second lens.

Most folks purchasing the D-40 go with the kit lens, the Nikkor 18-55mm, and add the Nikkor 55-200mm lens to complete the kit. That will work quite well for most folks, but it is not suitable for wildlife and bird photography, where there is the need for 300 and 400mm lenses.

You did not mention it, but you should probably figure in the cost of an external flash such as the SB-600 or SB-800. Some folks like the smallness of the SB-400, and it is handy. However, while it tilts, it does not swivel.

I am sure others will mention other options, features, and decision points, but this should be sufficient to get the discussion started.

Sarah Joyce
Thank you all for great information.

Th Answer you question :

For now I will use the camera for

Family picture = 90 %

print picture large than 8x10 = 5% (if I shot some nice one I will blow it up)

Cropping = 30% - 40%

So I think I am going to get :

OPtion A. D40 with kit 18-55 mm + 55 - 200 mm VR.

For Option B : If I go for the D80 :

Should I go for the 18-70mm as kit instead of 18-135mm then add the 55 - 200 mm VR ?

OPtion C : just get the D40 or D80 body and add a 18-200mm VR for now.

Which option will you select ?

For Flash I will look into it the next fews days. Since I will use the Camera mostly at day time. Humm I remember back to the good old days I need the flash to take picture File camera (135mm) at day time if the background are too bright (like facing the sun)

Thanks !

Guppies
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Old Aug 5, 2007, 5:39 PM   #6
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guppies-

I am not conversant with Canadian prices. However, Option A is the least expensive solution, while providing you with excellent lenses. Option B is more expensive, and Option C is even more expensive.

Here in the USA you cannot buy just the D-40 body alone, so there is no savings, at least here in the USA,by replacing the Nikkor 18-55mm kit lens with the Nikkor 18-200mm VR lens called for in Option C.

Don't worry, at least for the time being, about an external flash, just plan for it in your budget. As a Digital Camera Instructor I have lots of cameras, as well as some of the DSLR cameras. Based on my use of them I would guess that the D-40 will present the easiest learning curve while making the transition from a digicam to the D-40. The D-40's in camera photo processing has a digicam look to it, so you will also feel at home there as well. And the D-40 images will present the lowest need for post processing.

You mentioned cropping, but that might be a factor if you are not into post processing your images. The images out of the D-40 are excellent. Certainly the 6mp of the D-40 allows for 16" X 20" enlargements, if youkeep the cropping to a real minimum.

You mention Optios A, B, and C, what kind of budget have you allocated for this purchase? I ask that because there will be follow-on items that you will most probably desire such as a camera case, the external flash and the like. if you do go with the D-80, the Nikkor 18-70mm is an excellent choice and can be paired with the Nikkor 55-200mm VR lens with only a small focal length overlap. Keep in mind that the NIkkor 18-200mmVR will cost more than the D-40 kit, at least it does in the USA. The Nikkor 18-200mm lens will work equally well on either the D-40, the D-40X, the D-80, and the D-200. It is a high quality lens. However some folks do not like its rather large physical size.

You have not told us much about your photo background and experience. For folks who have used a film SLR the transition isa good dealeasier. All of us stand ready to help you with this decision and suggestions, I guess the next step is to decide whether it will be Option A, B, or C. Please be sure to physically handle these cameras to ascertain that they feel very good in hand, and that your reach to the various controls is comfortable and easily accomplished.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 6, 2007, 1:08 AM   #7
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Thank you for the reply. That is crazy I check the pricing for the same Camera between Canada and U.S. The different is at least 20% - 30% different or more

Example : Nikon 55 - 200 VR selling at state is $ 229.95. IN Canada is $ 339.99

D40 kit at state is $524.95 Canada sell for 700.00

Exchange rate is $ 1.00 Cdn = 0.95 $ us

My lord.

Myknowledge with SLR from a scale 1 to 10. I think I am at 4...lol

I love taking picture with my Nikon 135mm file camera before. I am looking at to spend around $ 1500.00 for now.

Since I am going on Holiday soon within 4 days. Maybe I am going to get a Canon 850IS or a Nikon P5000 for now and go down state to purchase the SLR (is only 3 hrs drive) next month. And bye sometime to select the right one

Or I am going back to the store and purchase Just the D40 kit

for now to play and learn and see they will drop the pricing a little.

Since there isat least $ 170.00 different. Since I am going to Japan maybe I can pick up one other there if the pricing is right.



Thanks !

Guppies
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Old Aug 6, 2007, 10:37 AM   #8
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guppies-

The USA pruchase option is the better option. I was recently in Japan and was very surprised to learn how high the prices were on cameras. Enjoy your vacation, take some great photos, and we will be right here to help you when you return from you holidays.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 6, 2007, 11:13 AM   #9
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mtclimber wrote:
Quote:
guppies-

The USA pruchase option is the better option. I was recently in Japan and was very surprised to learn how high the prices were on cameras. Enjoy your vacation, take some great photos, and we will be right here to help you when you return from you holidays.

Sarah Joyce
Quote:
Thanks ! I just went to some site in Japan there prices is pretty high. Lol
Quote:
I think Nikonor othershould take a lesson like Ipod, Xbox, and even Wii for pricing structure their pricing are very close worldwide maybe +/- 5%.
Quote:
Sometime it make me feeling bad, trying to get back to learn taking pictures and l already got ripe off by the dealer in Canada to start with.
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Thanks !
Quote:
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