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Old Aug 12, 2007, 12:51 PM   #21
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The idea of an Olympus E-510 with the Zukio 14-54mm lens is a nice idea, and that particular lens is a very nice lens. However the total cost of that package is almost $(US) 1,150.00. That leaves precious little for the other items that might be needed to put together a workable kit.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 12, 2007, 1:06 PM   #22
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i hear what you're saying sarah. thing is, i will be able to get the 510 kit for under $600 so it's very tempting. and i'm still confused about the smaller sensor. wouldn't a bigger sensor make better quality photos with all other things being equal? (sorry for the noobish question)
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Old Aug 12, 2007, 1:24 PM   #23
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alleyooptroop wrote:
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i will be able to get the 510 kit for under $600...
Suggested Reading:

How to Buy a Digital Camera without being Robbed

Always check out any vendor you consider using http://www.resellerratings.com

If they're not listed, I'd avoid them.

If they have a small number of reviews, I'd avoid them (since vendors have been known to "pad" their own ratings with glowing reviews, and the same old scammers with new business names and web sites pop up often).


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Old Aug 12, 2007, 1:28 PM   #24
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thanks for looking out for me JimC. i would actually be buying through olympus as my work had a discount program with them. trust me, i've read plenty of horror stories about some of those retailers in nyc.
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Old Aug 12, 2007, 5:35 PM   #25
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alleyooptroop wrote:
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i think i need a little more education on the smaller sensor. what are the advantages/disadvantages to the smaller sensor?
Short answer:

The Olympus camera and lenses will be smaller and lighter, and will have a greater depth of field than offerings from the other brands. You decide if these are advantages or disadvantages.

Long answer:

The sensor in the Olympus E-510 is 17.3 x 13.0mm, while the sensor in the Canon XT is 22.2 x 14.8mm, and 23.5mm x 15.7mm in the Pentax K100D. This means that, if all these cameras have lenses of the same focal length attached, the Olympus will have a narrower field of view than the Canon, which will have a slightly narrower field of view than the Pentax. This is good because lenses on the Olympus will have a greater apparent magnification than on the others, so for the Olympus to have the same field of view as the others, it's lens can be smaller and lighter. It doesn't help so much with wide angle lenses, though, and it seems that will be your primary use.

Another effect of having the smaller sensor is that the Olympus will have a greater depth of field for the same field of view and the same aperture. Depth of field is the range in front of, and behind, the subject you've focused on, that will still be in focus.

As an example, if the Pentax had a 50mm lens attached, and the Olympus had a 37.5mm lens attached, they would both have the same field of view. If they both were focused on a subject 50 feet away, andwere usingan apertureof f/2.8, on the Pentax, objects that were from 37 to 76 feet away would be in focus. On the Olympus, however, objects that were from 32 to 92 feet away would be in focus. (see http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.htmlfor more info.)

Now, sometimes you want a lot of depth of field, and sometimes you want very little depth of field. You can increase the depth of field by using a smaller aperture, and decrease the depth of field by using a larger aperture. But because the Olympus has a smaller sensor, it starts off with more depth of field and there's only so much you can do to lessen it.

For the most part, it's an artistic decision, but the Olympus gives you less to play with in that single regard.
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Old Aug 12, 2007, 5:53 PM   #26
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alleyooptroop wrote:
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i hear what you're saying sarah. thing is, i will be able to get the 510 kit for under $600 so it's very tempting. and i'm still confused about the smaller sensor. wouldn't a bigger sensor make better quality photos with all other things being equal? (sorry for the noobish question)
That is VERY cheap for the E510. Make sure that its not the E500, which is the old, discontinued model. The E500 (my camera) is a nice camera in its element, but the E510 has made some nice improvements and is certainly worth more money.

The E510 added stabilization, as well as much improved high ISO performance. If its the E510 you are pricing, I'd go for it at that price. That's a couple hundred less than normal pricing.


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Old Aug 12, 2007, 7:11 PM   #27
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And if you go with the E-510, I'd try to get just the body and the 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5. The kit lens (14-42mm f/3.5-5.6) won't be much use to you.
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Old Aug 12, 2007, 7:22 PM   #28
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Alleyooptroop-

I sincerely think that one element of rather important info is being left out of our discussion. Simply stated: if you wanted to make a 16" X 20" enlargement from an Olympus image, because of the smaller initial image it is going to require greater or added enlargement of that original image to get your 16" X 20" enlargements.

Whenever you blow something up larger, as would be required for the Olympus image, you run a greater chance of seeing pixelation and showing artefactsthan you would with the Pentax image.

Its just a thought.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 12, 2007, 7:46 PM   #29
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mtclimber wrote:
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Alleyooptroop-

I sincerely think that one element of rather important info is being left out of our discussion. Simply stated: if you wanted to make a 16" X 20" enlargement from an Olympus image, because of the smaller initial image it is going to require greater or added enlargement of that original image to get your 16" X 20" enlargements.

Whenever you blow something up larger, as would be required for the Olympus image, you run a greater chance of seeing pixelation and showing artefactsthan you would with the Pentax image.

Its just a thought.

Sarah Joyce
I've been watching this topic as it was interesting but didn't think I could add anything to it, however I'm not sure that I agree with this statement. Assuming we are talking about a good lens and not stupid high ISO meaning noise is an issue then the above is surely a factor or camera resolution rather than sensor size. The size of the sensor is taken out of the equation as the field of view is maintained by the use of a shorter lens. Pixelation is the ability to see pixels due to the size they have needed to be blow up to, so if you have one 6pm camera next to another for arguments sake then the pixel count is the same so each pixel is the same size when printed. It is only when going to larger pixel counts can you reduce pixelisation (obviously interpellation can help out here) so not sure the sensor size is a consideration.

Personally I would go for a Canon, Nikon or Pentax as I think the systems are the best on the market currently.

Just my 2 pence (I have to put some britishness into this LOL),

Mark
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Old Aug 12, 2007, 8:08 PM   #30
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mtclimber wrote:
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I sincerely think that one element of rather important info is being left out of our discussion. Simply stated: if you wanted to make a 16" X 20" enlargement from an Olympus image, because of the smaller initial image it is going to require greater or added enlargement of that original image to get your 16" X 20" enlargements.
I think that you're confusing the size of the image sensor with the size of the image. Of the original three, and now four dSLRs that alleyooptroop is considering, the Olympus dSLRsactually produce the largest images at 10MP. The Canon XT creates 8MP images, and the Pentax K100D creates 6MP images. All should work well for 11x14 prints, but for 16x20, I'd prefer to start with a 10MP image.

But I've got a shot I took with my Nikon CoolPix 880 3MP P&S that I cropped to about 80% and printed at 8x10, and you need an eye loupe to see the pixelation.
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