Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 12, 2007, 8:36 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

I don't do a lot of very large prints, so I tip my hat to you folks.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 12:41 AM   #32
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 29
Default

such great info, i'm so glad i found this board. upon further reading i found out that the 510 (in manual focus mode i assume) uses "motorised manual focusing". can someone explain this to me? if a motor is moving the lens to focus, then it isn't manual is it?:?
alleyooptroop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 6:24 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

alleyooptroop wrote:
Quote:
upon further reading i found out that the 510 (in manual focus mode i assume) uses "motorised manual focusing". can someone explain this to me? if a motor is moving the lens to focus, then it isn't manual is it?:?
Typically, a camera's lens would have a foucsing ring that you would use to manually focus the lens, but the Olympus E-510 uses a motor that you control to focus the lens. The difference is that you'd be grasping the lens and twisting your wrist to manually focus on a typical dSLR. On the E-510, you'll be pushing some buttons.

In autofocus mode, the camera would focus the lens itself and decide what to focus on. In manual focus mode, you still focus the lens; you're just using a motor todo the twisting.

The E-510 has a feature/handicap that most other dSLRs don't have. The E-510 allows you to have a live image on the electronic viewfinder before you take the shot. This is typical of the average P&S digicam, but unusual for a dSLR because the image sensor is covered by the mirror that projects the image onto the focusing screen in the viewfinder. The disadvantage of this system is that the E-510 can't autofocus while the live image is being displayed. Those two features can't be used simultaneously, so you'd be trading one feature for another.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 7:05 AM   #34
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

TCav wrote:
Quote:
Typically, a camera's lens would have a foucsing ring that you would use to manually focus the lens, but the Olympus E-510 uses a motor that you control to focus the lens. The difference is that you'd be grasping the lens and twisting your wrist to manually focus on a typical dSLR. On the E-510, you'll be pushing some buttons.
The E series lenses still have a focus ring, and you still twist this focus ring to use manual focus. It works the same way it does on a typical DSLR lens from the other major manufacturers in that respect.

The difference is that it's a "fly by wire" system and a motor moves the actual elements in the lens, versus the focus ring being mechanically coupled.

The E System models also have a menu option that lets you choose the direction of the focus ring. So, if you prefer a clockwise rotation to go from infinity to close focus or vice-versa, you can set it as preferred.

Note that so far, the Sigma lenses in this mount retain a mechanically coupled focus ring.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 7:33 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

My mistake. Thank you, JimC,for catching that.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 4:30 PM   #36
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 29
Default

as i haven't made up my mind yet, what are your guys and gals thoughts on buying refurbished cameras? i found a refurbished canon d20 for just a little more than my original budget. is it at all a risk or will i be able to get more camera for my buck?
alleyooptroop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 4:33 PM   #37
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,397
Default

Depends who has done the recon and what the guarantee is, if it is all with Canon and you get a full year then I would entertain the idea if not personally I would not be too keen (and don't forgetI shoot with 2 Canon dSLRs).
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 4:58 PM   #38
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

alleyooptroop-

Mark is very correct. Who actually did the refurb job is important. The number of shutter actuations is also important, as is what kind of guarantee are they willing to provide to you as the buyer. I would also hang in there to get a full year guarantee.

Then it would somewhat like buying a new camera. You just don't want to buy somebodyelse's problem camera. Because of their fast burst mode (5 fps), Canon 20D's sometimes do hard duty with sports photography and the like. That is why knowing the number of shutter actuations is a measure of use and wear.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 6:28 PM   #39
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 29
Default

it's through adorama refurbished by canon. i talked to a csr and he said canon does not include any warantee but adorama gives their own 90 day. is it worth it? here's the link:

http://www.adorama.com/ICA20DKR.html
alleyooptroop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 13, 2007, 6:46 PM   #40
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

I have had excellent dealings with Adorama. The price is right. However, I did not see their evaluation of the camera condition. It is usually a letter code.

The 90 day warranty does mean something and I think that Adorama will stand behind it. I don't mean to bug you, but if you could weedle 6 months out of them, instead of just 90 days,I would say go for it.

The reason that I say 6 months is that you are going to have to go through a learning curve with a camera such as the canon 20D, and you will have less usage in the first three months, and then you will pick up speed.

Another possibility is to buy it "subject to personal inspection." That is not an unusual thing when you are buying it sight unseen. Tell them nothing more than that, then pay an experienced Canon camera repairman to take a look at it. It will probably cost you $35 to $60 but it would be worth it just for the peace of mind.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:44 AM.