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Old Aug 18, 2007, 11:49 AM   #1
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I have been taking photos for years but nothing really serious mostly just for keepsake but have always been intrigued with photography and want to start taking it seriously now and someday would like to freelance for a small profit. I have reviewed numerous cameras and am wondering what would be the best purchase with alot of options and numerous lense capability and computer friendly since I am just starting out
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Old Aug 18, 2007, 12:29 PM   #2
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dmxdragon,

I think you'll get better responses in the "what camera should I buy" forum
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Old Aug 18, 2007, 1:03 PM   #3
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Moved.

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Old Aug 18, 2007, 2:05 PM   #4
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dmx-

Welcome to this folder of the Forum. When you mention "body" does that mean that you might be thinking of purchasing a DSLR camera? In terms of seriously learning more about photography, there are many avenues you can take.

You might check out the courses being offered by your local Community College. That would be a good start in terms of learning the basics of photography.

All of the current crop of DSLR cameras can produce excellent photos. Currently, the K-100D which has "in body" Image Stabilization, which Pentax calls "SR" for Shake Reduction, is the current low price leader among the consumer DSLR cameras due to the Pentax Summertime Rebates now going on until September 30th.

Please tell us a bit more about the kind of photos you like to take and the cameras that interest you. I have attachededseveral photo from the Pentax K100D camera for your reference.

Sarah Joyce





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Old Aug 18, 2007, 4:20 PM   #5
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dmxdragon wrote:
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... what would be the best purchase with alot of options and numerous lense capability and computer friendly ...
Without knowing what type of photography you would like to do, I can only say that Canon and Nikon have the broadest selection ofoptions and lenses. If you can find a Canon or a Nikon dSLR body you are comfortable with, it will serve you well, wherever photography takes you.

Other cameras might have features that Canon and Nikon don't offer, or they may be cheaper, but they don't have the broad selection of lenses and accessories that Canon and Nikon have.

But if you could be more specific about what your plans are, someone might be able to advise you about an alternative that might suit you better.
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 10:50 AM   #6
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Yes I am thinking about the Nikon D40 since I am kind of an advanced beginner. I want the capability to shoot landscape, portrait, action, close up and just about anything that comes to mind at the time. I am intrigued by photography and have studied it off and on for the last 20 years but have never really taken it serious as a potential future in the business. I want to freelance and maybe someday get noticed. Let me know if you think the Nikon D40 is a good starter for what I am looking for since I don't want to invest in alot upfront and what would be the best multipurpose lenses to get starting out. Thanks for any help
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 11:57 AM   #7
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The Nikon D-40 is one of the most popular of the consumer level DSLR cameras on the market today. it is also one of the easiest consumer level DSLR cameras to transition to from a point and shoot camera. While the Nikon 18-200mmVR lens is the preferred single lens solution, a much more economical strategy is also available. It is made up of the kit lens (Nikon's 18-55mm Series II lens) and the Nikon 55-200mmVR lens, which is a great deal less expensive than the Nikon 18-200mm VR lens.

This would be a good time to sharpen your photographic skills. Look into the courses being offered by your local Community College. Most Community Colleges have a number of very good courses in Photography. Cut your teeth on the Nikon D-40 and then with your lenses in hand, you can move up the Nikon food chain.

If budget or money is a factor, the Pentax K100D with the kit lens and the Pentax 50-200mm lens can be had for an all time low price of around $(US) 540 to $(US) 560, thanks to the Pentax Summertime Rebate Program which remains in effect until 30 September.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 1:13 PM   #8
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The D40/D40x is a very good entry level DSLR. It has two major drawbacks as a DSLR but otherwise is very nice:

1. Only 3 focus points. This is a disadvantage for composition and a disadvantage for sports shooting. For composition purposes it requires a lot more focus / recompose. For action it can be very difficult because you only have 3 focus points in the entire screen to either track your subject or, if you prefer using single focus point you again have less choice in your composition - and with action you can't focus/recompose. There are those that would argue that a center focus point is really all anyone needs. To that I counter - then why do professional cameras have 45 focus points? A number of other consumer DSLR cameras have 7 or 9 focus points.

2. Does not have a focus motor. What this means is you lose autofocus with quite a few lenses other Nikon cameras CAN autofocus with. Now, Nikon has enough lenses that WILL autofocus to cover all the focal ranges you may be interested in. However, realize going in which lenses are left OUT of that arsenal. First - fast primes. 2.0, 1.8 or 1.4 aperture prime lenses - popular for portrait work, essential for low light work and indoor action. I believe there is one or two fast primes available. Second category of lenses missing - low cost consumer grade lenses - either from Nikon, or third party manufacturers like Tamron, Tokina or Sigma. To get autofocus you are forced to buy higher end lenses - either Sigma EX lenses or Nikon's af-s lenses.

On the plus side - you get Nikon's excellent sensor technology, color and crispness. An excellent array of flashes and excellent lenses. And, very importantly you have a nice upgrade path if you do want to get more advanced. Right now, as TCAV said - Nikon and Canon have the most robust systems. So buying into those systems if you've an eye for eventual professional work is a smart thing.

Unfortunately I find those two strip-downs (take out focus points and take out focus motor) really cripple the D40 compared to other choices. They hit two different markets though. The lack of focus motor hits the penny-conscious buyer because they lose out on a number of very fine (but not exceptional) consumer grade lenses. The advanced ameteur loses out because fast primes won't autofocus and because you're stuck with just 3 focus points (again Nikon used to include 7 or 9 focus points on their entry level models).


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Old Aug 19, 2007, 5:12 PM   #9
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Thankyou for the insight and I think that I am going to jump into the D40 to cut my teeth as you say. Thanks again and don't be a stranger. :|
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 5:17 PM   #10
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I understand theadvantage of multiple focus points for tracking rapidly moving objects, e.g., sports action and birds in flight. But if professional cameras have 45 focus points,are cameras with only 7 to 9 focus points suitable for this type of photography? This isn't one of my current interests and one focus point is enough for me at present, but I presume that a 45 focus point camera is a sigificant performance and cost upgrade from an entry level DSLR (like going from a Mustang to a Ferrari).
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