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Old Aug 20, 2007, 4:57 AM   #11
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I currenty own a Fuji s6000fd. It is in the same family as the superzoom Canon's mentioned above, but works well even at ISO 400 and 800 so there is less need for flash in low light situations. This camera would help her to learn a bit more of the manual controls required to get deeper into photography wihtout breaking the bank. Can be had for about $350-400 USD including all the accessories (memory, bag, UV filter, rechargable batteries, etc)

You can see some of my pictures here to get an idea of the high image quality that can be obtained from this camera (although most are in daylight)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sounddust/

or search s6000fd or s6500fd for more examples on flickr

Different models of this camera, the s9000 specifically have a hotshoe so you can add an external flash if that is a necessity.

In terms of going to DSLR, I am considering that move myself but not so much for a displeasure with the Fuji, but moreso to pursue certain types of photography that can really only be obtained by using a range of lenses designed fo specific purposes.

Just wanted to throw the Fuji in the hat as an option though, as I've been pretty happy with. It is at least worth researching.


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Old Aug 20, 2007, 5:34 AM   #12
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Hi All,



Thanks for the info on the Fuji –never really considered Fuji in my short list – was leaning towardseitherCanon or Nikon.



Being relatively a newbie myself to photography myself –have owned a P & S camera for about 5 years –but all I knew was to press the shutter button and out comes a picture. So…from a newbies perspective – my understanding is that you should try and get image stabilization in any digi camera. With this in mind –here's what one of the well known technology sites said in their review of the FujiS6000 –good optical zoom – bad no optimal image stabilization – auto white balance is poor under artificial light. Overall, the Fuji lacks true image stabilization.

From what I'm learning on the forum and in general - it would seem that a good compromise between a mid range P & and a DSLR would be to go the superzoom route. So, I think one of the keycriterion that I need to look for is a camera that can take pictures in low light conditions/possibilities. Hence, why I was leaning towards Canon's S3/S5. Other than the S series or the Fuji S6000FD what otherSuper Zooms should I look at keeping in mind the low light requirements.



Foxx

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Old Aug 20, 2007, 11:52 AM   #13
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Foxx-

Canon's point and shoot cameras, and in particular the S-2, S-3, and S-5 are certainly not cameras that do well in a low light level shooting environment, that is why I immediately asked about the possibility of using flash.

The Fuji cameras are excellent in low light, but do not currently feature any stabilization. the Sony H-5, which do have IS, is an ultazoom that does better in low light. However, its performance is limited to ISO 400 and below, thus slow shutterspeeds become a problem.

That takes us back, once more to DSLR cameras, whose larger CMOS imager makes them much better low light level performers. If cost is a factor, purchase the Pentax K-100D body and a Pentax 16-45mm lens with the current rebate, and you will have a great camera and lens combination with IS in the body of the camera, and you will get a $(US) 150.00 rebate as well. And the camera will have a professional look to it as well.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 20, 2007, 12:46 PM   #14
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Hi Sarah,



Thanks for the info – the specific Pentax offer I wouldn't qualify for – I don't live in the States. Besides, I'd prefer to either stick with Canon or Nikon. However, it doesn't look like Nikon have a comparable product(s) to the S2/S3/S5. I think going digital SLR is overkill at the moment. If I was going that route – I might as well spend $2K on a Camera which is ridiculous. I think the Super zoom cameras are going to be a sufficient camera choice for the present time.



Foxx

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Old Aug 20, 2007, 1:06 PM   #15
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foxx-

I will respect your superzoom selection. However, how are you going to get some sort of IS with a real low light capability? The Sony H-5 is the closest that I can think of among the superzooms.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 20, 2007, 10:00 PM   #16
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Foxx, why the need for a superzoom if you will take the pictures mostly indoor? Indoor, the zoom will not be that useful. A wide angle is more interesting and I think the Fuji has it. It has no IS but a tripod is all you need to fix that.

Of course, a cheap entry-level DSLR would even do better but remember that you loose the video mode and you cannot use the LCD to frame your picture (unless you go with Olympus).

If you still prefer a superzoom, consider the Canon S5 or the Panasonic FZ50. They both have a hot shoe.
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 5:44 AM   #17
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Delius wrote:
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Foxx, why the need for a superzoom if you will take the pictures mostly indoor? Indoor, the zoom will not be that useful. A wide angle is more interesting and I think the Fuji has it. It has no IS but a tripod is all you need to fix that.

Of course, a cheap entry-level DSLR would even do better but remember that you loose the video mode and you cannot use the LCD to frame your picture (unless you go with Olympus).

If you still prefer a superzoom, consider the Canon S5 or the Panasonic FZ50. They both have a hot shoe.
The need for the superzoom is for outside pictures - need to capture scenery and nature - again for the business. As previously mentioned -at this point - a DSLR is overkill - perhaps thats the next camera but for the near term - I think a super zoom will suit. Am leaning towards Canon - don't like Panasonic and my other choice is Nikon - however - I don't think Nikon makes a super zoom P & S.
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 6:58 AM   #18
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The Pana FZ50 is probably the best non-DSLR superzoom not only because of its image quality but also because it has the best handling of the bunch. If you go to a website like Photography of the Day, you will see that it's one of the most popular camera for the advanced amateur (amongst the non-DSLR).

Now aside from Canon, there are also other superzooms:
- Olympus SP-550UZ : 18X zoom! (like the upcoming Fuji and Pana FZ18)
- Kodak Z612, Z712, Z812. They are very cheap. The last one is interesting if you are into video: it can do 1280x720 at 30fps.
- And the Fuji

The best bangs for the bucks right now are probably the FZ8 and the Canon S3 IS if you don't need all the manual controls of the FZ50. A used FZ30 could be a great bargain too.

And of course, go to a store to try them...
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