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Old Aug 19, 2007, 5:56 AM   #1
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Hi All,

A newbie to both the forum & photoraphy in general:idea:. Have read alot of posts on here -alot of very useful and insightful information. As someone else said in the forum - the more you research - the more confused you become:shock:.

A bit of background.....am trying to decide - a mid range P & S or an entry level DSLR

I bought my first digital some five years ago :shock:. Am now looking to replace -however the difficulty - it's a bday present for the g/f. She needs one for both travel, and her business which she is shooting people moving around primarily indoors, printing out in 8 by 10 sized pictures and posting to her website. Since she is new to photography she is under the misnomer that the larger the pixels the better (not necessarily) and that you have to spend about $2,000 to get a half decent camera. I was leaning towards either the Canon 570IS or the Canon Rebel. Quite a price delta. However, I want something that will last well into the future.

Comments/thoughts/ideas:idea:
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 9:57 AM   #2
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foxx-

The first thing that comes to mind is that there could be a rather sizeable skill challenge by accellerating from ground zero to even a consumer level DSLR camera. Perhaps you can tell us a bit more about the circumstances of the "indoor interview with a photo kind of situation" in which your girl friend is involved.

(a) How much ambient light will there be?

(b) Is using flash a possibility?

(c) Is there an action involved that must be stopped?

(d) If these photos are to be published on her website, why the need for 8" X10" prints?

If there was not a lot of action that had to be stopped, if she could use flash, and if she was within 10 feet of the people being photographed, a Canon A-570IS might do the job and it is very user friendly with 7mp, an optical viewfinder, and a size that would easily fit into her handbag.

If flash could not be used, if there was a need only to stop minimal action, the Fuji F-series might be appropiate.

Beyond that, it is going to have to be a larger camera, such as a DSLR, but that also poses a few problems as well due to the learing curve, perhaps the need to post process photos and the like. So please tell us more about the photo environment, the lighting, the action, and your girl friend's adaptibility to using a larger camera with more gear to carry. TGhen we can be more specific.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 2:09 PM   #3
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Sarah,

To answer your questions:

(a) How much ambient light will there be?

Answer: It depends – could vary widely from a little bit of light to lots of light



(b) Is using flash a possibility?

Answer: Possibility of using a flash.



(c) Is there an action involved that must be stopped?

Answer: Yes there's action. Could also be taking posed pictures of people. In all circumstances –there will be people involved



(d) If these photos are to be published on her website, why the need for 8" X10" prints?

Answer: Because she is going to hand out the picture to the client and charge for it.



Basically, I don't want to buy her crap – it has to be a camera that could evolve with her learning – am not concerned about the learning curve .



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Old Aug 19, 2007, 2:19 PM   #4
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Interesting set of criteria.You are right that more megapixels don't necessarily make better pictures, depends on the camera,and the outputdesired.

My first thought was to focus on the travel and think that a P&S would be the way to go because they are lighter and easier to carry around. Then I thought about 8 x 10 prints and selling your work and think the rebel would be a better way to go. The rebel would probably do fine with one lens for the work side of things, but I'd suspect she'd want a second lens (at least) for travel and now you've got additional expense as well as more junk to carry around. Before you buy the rebel (still not sure this would be the best solution), make sure she's willing to carry around the extras, and that she's willing to invest time in learning how to get the most out of the camera.
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 2:42 PM   #5
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foxx-

mtngal has really touched on the key points in question, concerning this photo application. So as I understand it, the work will sort of be as the "roving photographer."

Keep in mind that as this nation becomes more security conscious, I find more and more folks in the general public who are adverse to having their photos take, particularly of their children. There may also be a legality issue revovlving around privacy. It could become rather complex.

I agree that most probably this is an application for a DSLR camera. A consumer level DSLR camera can be purchased for less the $(US) 500 now, so that still fits your budget. The question revolves then around the necessary learning curve and the size of the kit necessary to do a good job.

How does your girlfriend feel about the learning curve and thesize of the kit?Perhaps you could help her as well. Well, anyway it is an idea.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 3:25 PM   #6
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Hi All,



The photos are people in action as part of the business –releases would be obtained to use their photos in any promotional material whether it be website, collateral/brochures etc.



So if the consensus is to go the DSLR route –which ones/models would, you look at? I had mentioned the Rebel as one I was leaning towards as it has a lot of good reviews. There are some pluses and minuses to the Rebel such as the smaller LCD screen. Also, from what I understand – there are a lot of third party lens manufacturers so if and when she needs another lens –there's ample supply/choice in terms of lenses.


Another thought in terms of camera choices - how about something in between the A570IS and the Rebel. Was thinking of analternative at the higher end of the P & S category such as the Canon S3 or S5?


Haven't asked her as it's a surprise –birthday present so can't exactly ask her



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Old Aug 19, 2007, 4:33 PM   #7
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foxx-

The Canon S-5IS is certainly a possibility, and it would be able to produce the needed 8" X 10" photos. However, you would have to depend on using a good external flash, as the S-5IS is not really capable of operating in a low light level environment with ease. The S-5IS does best when used at or below ISO 200, that is the reason for the needed external flash to mount on the S-5IS's hotshoe. The S-5IS ir really best when it is out of doors, and in a sinlit environment.

For only around $100 to $150 more you could easily get into either the Nikon D-40 or the Pentax K-100d. The extra money would be well spent on the K-100 or the D-40, as eitherwould certainly give you a lot more flexibility and photo ease in the type of photo situation you describe.

However, in all fairness I must say that you should likewise be aware of the fact that as you move from a point and shoot camera to a DSLR camera, more post processing of your photos will most probably be required. That would require an added learning curve.

I have attached an indoor test photo that I quickly snapped with my S-5IS equipped with an external flash for your reference.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 19, 2007, 4:43 PM   #8
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Sarah,



Thanks for the info –so sounds like the S-series from Canon is off the list. Not sure on the Nikon D40 –read a bad review on it –they said for a bit more money you could get the Rebel. However, it's a slippery slope from a cost/budget perspective. At some point, I have to draw a line in the sand as to what is a reasonable cost for what I need it for. Am not really concerned about the learning curve –at least you wouldn't "outgrow" the camera.



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Old Aug 19, 2007, 6:23 PM   #9
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foxx-

Thanks for your reply. If you can find a Canon 350D/XT model that would save you some cash. The XT is running around $(US) 550 to $(US) 600. Otherwise the jump to the Canon XTi is fairly substantial $$-wise, although do get 10mp.

I am glad to hear that the learning curve is not a negative factor.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 20, 2007, 3:30 AM   #10
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http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Digital-...398&sr=8-1 here is the link to the rebel XT at amazon for under $600 with lens.

btw, the rebel is a more than decent camera, and i recently got my 30D - a very decent camera - for well under $2000.
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