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Old Aug 24, 2007, 2:39 PM   #11
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Hi OC Man,
Unfortunately every camera has its limitations. And, each person has their own set of expectations, preferences, tolerances and budget. Meaning, some don't mind, or even prefer, to have a larger body camera and lenses. Others are willing to put up with the lesser quality and lesser versatility of a point and shoot. Some can afford to buy the best dSLR with all the lenses they wish and a great point and shoot camera. Somecan afford all that, yet feel that the quality and speed of their point and shoot is just perfect and see no need to get a dSLR.

I bought a dSLR about six months ago. I don't use it that much. I personally just think its too big to carry around. I don't want to be dedicated to only taking pictures when I go do something. But, it does take nicer photos than my point and shoot does and its "easier" for me to be creative with it (for example, because it has a manual focus ring and optical veiwfinder its very easy to see what I am focusing on when I want to create an effect by manually focusing on a specific feature in a scene).

If Ihad to pickone thingthat is better about dSLR, it would in fact be speed. It is alot faster than my point and shoot. However, my point and shoot is an older model and is slower than new models. As Sarah mentioned, you should check out some of the latest point and shoot models and see how they compare to your current camera.

Beyond the speed issue, I would say that the only other things "I" percieve as an advantage over my point and shoot are that the dSLR has better dynamic range,nice opticalveiwfinder andmanual focus ring, and less noise (ALOT less noise, but still, for me its not a huge deal).

My dSLR purchase was definately a learning experience for me. I always thought of dSLR as better, and who doesn't want a "better" anything But the truth is thatthere are pros and cons with both point and shoot and dSLR. Here is a shortlist of things I have learned after buying a dSLR:
-I overlooked how many excellent pictures are actually produced by point and shoot cameras.
- It is nice to have movie mode available. dSLRs don't have movie mode.
- With dSLR you need a macro lens to be able to focus real close on a subject (I'm talking within 5-10 cm), something any point and shoot can do without aproblem.
- Good zoom lenses can be very expensive.
- Wide angle lenses are expensive.
- Lenses that work better in low light are very expensive.
- When you are taking a picture where there is a high contrast of bright and dark elements in the scene, you will still have to either underexpose or risk blowing the highlights.

So, it comes down to your personal set of expectations, preferences, tolerances and budget
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 3:15 PM   #12
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Thanks, Contriver-

You stated the case very well indeed.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 3:21 PM   #13
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My solution is to have a small DSLR and an ultracompact P&S. I use the DSLR for my kids' events like birthday parties, recitals, portraits, and mostly around the house. I use the P&S when it is not practical to carry around the DSLR like going to the play ground with the kids (I would be playing with them). It is not easy to carry around all that DSLR gear stuff when you have little kids to carry or tow around too.

Newer P&S cameras have less shutter lag than older models. I try to get around shutter lag by learning to anticipate the action and pressing the shutter before it takes place. It seems to work with fixed focus P&S cameras and some practice. I can also use the video mode on the P&S to capture all the action like tantrums.



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Old Aug 24, 2007, 3:24 PM   #14
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Sarah: Yes, very true all you said. I am by no means saying P&S cams or superzooms are inferior. Just wanted to put my thoughts and views up on it. I did/do have though, two newer P&S cams, the Canon S3 IS and my wife's Fuji S6000fd. The lag isn't horrible on them, but their definately not as quick as a DSLR.



But on the DSLR witha lens part, I did see (just for comparison) an Olympus? I think online, it was a kit with an 18-180 lens (which on the 4/3rds system is something like 35-350?, cant remember the exact numbers) and it was something like 899.00. So that seemed like a great deal for a DSLR with I.S. and a do it all lens


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Old Aug 24, 2007, 4:33 PM   #15
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Highway-

Be the solution Nikon or Olympus, it does not help the person on this Forum that has just $(US) 200.00 to $(US) 300.00 to spend on their ccamera.

DSLR cameras are fine, but oftentimes, the point and shoots are the only answer for the folks on a limited budget.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 4:40 PM   #16
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Sarah, he asked about DSLR's,
" I've been thinking a lot about high end Pocket-able camera vs. DSLR"
and his final line in his post
" P&S vs Dslr"
I have every right to answer him and give my opinion, thanks much but I don't need anyone getting on me for politely posting my opinion. He never said in his post he only had 300 to spend either. I was curteous to you and expect the same back,


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Old Aug 24, 2007, 6:21 PM   #17
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Highway-

I apologize if I confused the issue. I would agree with you that for you, individually, the Nikon D-40 was a ghreat solution. I am happy for you that it has all worked out so well for you. I find no fault at all with your personal solution.

I was just attempting to speak for the other side of the issue, meaning the folks whose budget constraints do not allow them to seek a DSLR solution. In addition, there are some folks who do not want to carry a full DSLR kit with them all the time. So, they have opted to have both a DSLR camera and a point and shoot camera, and they use either camera based on their own personal determination. In summation, everyone must seek the solution that works well for them.

While shutter lag was a P&S fault some years ago, it no longer appears to be a problem for today's P&S cameras.

I hope that I have now made things clear on this issue.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 6:45 PM   #18
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No problems, I understand. I was merely answering the poster rather than speaking to all who read these forums. Yes, I completely understand as I have two P&S cameras, they are great and can take just as good of pictures as a DSLR. It's all about operation and personal choices. If I could only have one or the other, it would be a tough desicion.

Take care,
Ron
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 6:56 PM   #19
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An article here:

http://www.cameralabs.com/features/D...y_a_DSLR.shtml

I think that anyway if you're going to buy a DSLR, you will still need a P&S as they have some features the DSLR have not (compactness, video, "live view", ...).
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 11:47 PM   #20
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Delius wrote:
Quote:
An article here:

http://www.cameralabs.com/features/D...y_a_DSLR.shtml

I think that anyway if you're going to buy a DSLR, you will still need a P&S as they have some features the DSLR have not (compactness, video, "live view", ...).
As some of the others have mentioned. The best thing to do is to go to a Best Buy or any good camera shop and test a few models. Take some shots. You'll find in most cases that there really isn't much if any shutter lag. Where there would be lag is when you're using the flash. Some will power up faster for the next shot than other P&S cameras.

Actually many more DSLR's these days have "live view". First there were the Olympus DSLRs.Now there is the recentlyannounced Canon 40D (3" LCD, can use AF if you press AF-ON....previously you had to be in manual mode only). Then there is the newly announced Nikon D300 and D3. Both with 2 modes of AF shooting via "live view". Taking it to the next level.

I'm using a Sony DSC-H1. A decent P&S. With some of the abiilities of a DSLR (e.g. P/S/A/M, 12x optical zoom) and of course some limitations of a P&S. Haven't noticed any shutter lag when not using the flash. Even then there really isn't shutter lag. You're just waiting for the flash to power up for the next shot.

I'm in the market for my first DSLR. And now that the Canon G9 has RAW support again (the previous model, the G7,Canon decided to not include RAW support...why? I have no idea as that was one of the major selling points of the G series cameras).I might pick one of those up too later. As there are times where you'd love to be able to have a compact quality digicam with you where ever you go. To grab that chance of a lifetime shot. When you can't carry around your DSLR, a few lenses, flash and tripod. As some of the others mentioned.

The H1 is good but not compact.
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