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Old Sep 12, 2007, 6:25 PM   #31
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Hand held, full zoom, no pp other than resizing, camera sharpness set to Normal, moving target...

the Hun

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Old Sep 12, 2007, 7:56 PM   #32
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That's a great looking shot, Rinnie!

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 8:47 PM   #33
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Thanks Sarah.

the Hun

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Old Sep 12, 2007, 9:07 PM   #34
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Thanks Rinnie,

As Sarah said a very nice shot.

I think one last question should do it for me....or so I think :-)

Will all of these cameras be able to print out larger prints with good quality?

I saw where someone said that its not the camera that takes the great picture its the photographer. Not sure if that was on this forum or not but I thought it was a good point.

Also I believe Sarah showed where she took a great shot with a lower priced camera. Couldnt find the thread quickly again.

These examples tell me I will need to take a class no matter the camera I get. I just missed the classes that were offered at out local college. But I will be on the look out for the next one.

David
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 10:00 PM   #35
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Oh, David-

You are so correct. I am indeed one of those local Community College teachers. I also teach for our state university as well, but I will confidentally share with you that the best student-teacher interchanges seem to take place at the Community College level.

Yes, you can do it on your own. That is true. But various studies reveal that it usually takes many years, 6 to 10 to be exact. With the help of formal classroom training, the learning curve is dramatically cut to 2 to 3 years. So choose whichever pathway you desire, but, if it takes 6 to 10 years, think of all those photos that you will miss!

It is all up to you, dm67, David. Choose whichever camera and flash that appeals to you, but please get a bit of classrom training, it will really make a difference!

FWIIW, I still like the Sony H-2, followed by the S-5IS (due to the hot shoe), followed by the S-3IS. And I own a Fuji S-6000 camera as well. The lack of IS, IMHO is a HUGE difference.

Here is a Sony H-2 photo for your reference.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 10:40 PM   #36
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Sarah, that is a great picture. Just to make sure the cameras number is this correct, Sony DSC-H2?

This weekend while I am going back and forth to the stores I will definately pick it up and see how it feels and fits to me. The reviews I looked at were good as well. I believe dpreview eeked it out over the S3 IS for overall.

You are right the lack of IS is a concern for me and why I originally dropped it from my list.

I think it will all come down to how the cameras feel in my hand and my experience in the stores while going through the menus and buttons. Then pull in the learnings from this forum. And finally just gut feel I guess :-).

Also Alex, I did know about the different cards....but forgot about that when considering the samples....and thinking about buying possibly 3 cards may not be worth it....I think I would do better to apply to one of these cameras......thanks for the reminder though!

If only I could buy them all:G.

David
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Old Sep 13, 2007, 9:05 AM   #37
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David-

A word of caution. Yes, I feel that IS is essential, as you get far more photos that are "keepers" when your camera has IS. The current Sony H-series cameras on the dealer's shelves does NOT include the Sony H-2. The new models are the H-7 and H-9 models. IMHO, the newer models are not as good, as either the H-2 or H-5, which were the twin models from last year. The H-2, at least for me, is more preferable than its more expensive twin, the H-5 model. So you will have to find the Sony H-2 or H-5 cameras as "close-outs" or as used cameras. That is why I mentioned that OfficeMax was closing-out their inventory of Sony H-2 cameras at $(US) 199.95 to you. I have three model H-2 cameras that I keep for students to use in completing their assignments. There is always something of a race to see who gets to use the H-2 cameras, as they are that popular and so easy to use.

Please keep in mind, David, that there are three primary factors that come into play when choosing a camera:

(1) Your budget

(2) The camera's physical size. Will it meet your needs and expectations?

(3) How that camera feels "in hand."

Personally, I would caution you against buying three cards or chips to use in a single camera. I can quickly count sixteen cameras sitting here on the desk, and I have only 5 chips sitting on my computer ready for use. Three chips for a single camera, is a bit of "overkill," and least for me. Rather than more chips, David, you should be thinking about the flash or camera case that you will need.

One final word, David. Your photos will be only as good as your photographic knowledge. So please follow through on your intentions of getting some classroom training in photography, as well. Good luck to you and have fun shopping.

Sarah Joyce

Personally I would
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Old Sep 13, 2007, 3:05 PM   #38
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dm67 wrote:
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Cameras I am considering:

3) Canon Powershot S3 IS....vs the S5 IS - Seems for overall package these are good but image may not be the best of the bunch?
Just check the photos on my page below. All, except 3-4 photos from older worse cameras, are from my Canon S3. Most of the macros are taken with a pretty cheap, but high quality, closeup-lens.

sebastianfoto.se

I think you'll be totally fine with one of the superzooms, which one is up to you.
But you should feel confident that any modern superzoom you choose will print beautifully 8x10 and even larger, as long as you keep ISO really low.
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Old Sep 14, 2007, 2:48 AM   #39
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sebastianr,

Those were very good pictures. If I understand right you did most of those with the S3 and the macros had another lens attached to the existing lens? Is this what is called a teleconverter? If so I read in the forums that a teleconverter can damage a fuji barrel. Will it also for the other cameras under consideration if not supported?

Also thanks for the information on the printouts of 8x10. I assume low ISO is 200 or below and preferably 100 or 80 if camera supports it. I was looking for this. However, since they all can do well the decision is still hard!


Sarah, yep I will be saving my money on the memory cards and card reader. Put it to better use towards the camera, flash etc...

After seeing the photos from various examples I definately will be taking lessons. I also need to learn the post processing techniques as well. From what I have seen you can take an outstanding picture and frame it as is. Or take that picture and by either using camera technique and/or post processing and have a work of art. Those two ideas are the some of the reasons I want a nice quality image camera. So I can hang art work on my walls....art work that I made! :-)

David
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Old Sep 14, 2007, 12:31 PM   #40
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Yes all pics, except four I think, are from my S3.
Almost all macros are with a closeup-lens. Nothing to do with teleconverter, and I cant imagine a closeup-lens damaging a camera
Teleconverter are for increasing the focal length. Closeup-lenses are for decreasing the near-limit at full tele.

None of my pics are retouched in any way, just finetuned levels and cropped a bit where needed. So sure, a bit of Photoshop or similar is nice to know, even if you dont want to retouch and "cheat".

I would say ISO 200 is the highest usable for a fairly large print.
If you want to do even larger like 18x12 or so, be prepared for ISO 100 or below.
The noise shows up very well on larger prints. At least thats my experience.
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