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Old Sep 16, 2007, 2:27 PM   #1
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I just found out that Beach Camera (a reputable dealer) has the K100D with kit lens on sale for $395 + free shipping, after the $50 mail-in rebate. (See http://beachcamera.com/shop/product....ku=PKK100D1855 .)

I was considering the Fuji S6000 ($319 + tax), but now I'm intrigued by the K100D deal. I wanted the S6000 for the manual controls, wide angle lens, and low-light shooting. However, the K100D has image stabilization, but the kit lens is not as wide as the Fuji lens. And, I presume that the Pentax would have better image quality.

Do you think that the Pentax would be a better purchase than the S6000? On the one hand, I'm not interested in video capabilities and 10x zoom of the Fuji. On the other hand, I won't have the cash to upgrade the lens or buy additional lenses for the Pentax (at least for a couple of years--I'm a student). My photography interests are landscapes, street photography, and maybe portraits--photos to "showcase" in my home :-). I'm a newbie and want to have access to manual controls (without drilling down menus).

I'm looking forward to your opinions!
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Old Sep 16, 2007, 2:43 PM   #2
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jmd-

The Pentax K-100D with the kit lens is a much better deal than the Fuji S-6000. The wide angle position on the S-6000 is 28 degree (expressed in 35mm terms) The wide angle on the Pentax K-100D is roughly 27.5 degrees. So as far as wide angle capabilities go, the cameras are just about equal.

Where the big difference comes is:

(1) In the SR, or shake reduction which is Pentax's name for "in body" image stabilization.

(2) In the much larger imager on the Pentax K-100 when compared to the S-6000.

(3) And in the pure camera flexability that ony a DSLR can provide.

The K-100D with the kit lens will serve you very well for now and you can add another lens when you budget allows. IMHO this is a very easy choice.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 16, 2007, 2:54 PM   #3
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Actually the kit lens of the K100D is slightly more wide angle than the S6000. The Fuji is 28mm equivalent, and the Pentax kit lens is 27mm equivalent. However, the kit lens does have some noticeable vignetting at full wide angle and the Fuji probably doesn't, though you'll likely have to do your own investigating to see if this is a serious problem for you.

The biggest drawback of the Pentax versus the Fuji will be the lack of zoom. You might not think you'll need the reach so much, but you might find later on that you wish you had it. 75mm equivalent is not much compared to 300mm, and with the kit lens not having very wide apertures, the Fuji at longer zoom might have better looking bokeh for portraits.

As far as the kinds of photography you mentioned, the Pentax is definitely better suited if you really want professional looking images. In particular, if you can learn to work with RAW files you'll really be getting excellent quality images.

You say that you can't afford to upgrade to additional lenses, but that could change in the future. If you later decide that you do want some more zoom, or that you want a much brighter lens for low light or portraits, for between $150-$200 you can get another lens that will do the job, whereas with a P&S camera like the Fuji you have no such options.

Anyway, when shopping for cameras, particularly those on the cheaper side, everything is a compromise. The Fuji would be the more convenient, all-in-one solution, whereas the Pentax with the kit lens is more specialized and higher quality. Compared to other DSLRs, the Pentax has it's own pluses and minuses. As much advice as we can offer, you'll really need to do your own research and look at some images and handle the cameras so that you can come to your own decision about what you really need.

Good luck.
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Old Sep 16, 2007, 3:14 PM   #4
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The Fuji has a 6.2-66.7mm lens (because of the smaller image sensor, it provides an angle of view equivalent to a 28-300mm lens on a 35mm film camera), while the Pentax kit lens is an 18-55 (equivalent to a 27-82.5mm lens on a 35mm film camera.) So the Pentax actually provides a wider field of view, albeit only very slightly. The Fuji has a maximum aperture of f/2.8 at its shortest focal length, to f/4.9 at its longest focal length, while the Pentax has a maximum aperture of f/3.5-5.6, so, yes, the Fuji has afaster lens. The Pentax 18-55 has a minimum focusing distance of 10 inches, while the lens on the Fuji may only focus as close as 3 feet (depending on the focal length).

They both have the same maximum ISO setting (3200), though the Pentax only goes down to 200, while the Fuji goes down to 100. (I don't consider this difference significant.) They also have the same range of available shutter speeds. The Pentax has a good reputation for image quality, but so does the Fuji. The Pentax can shoot up to2.8 frames per second, but the Fuji maxes out at 2.2. In addition to the shake reduction, the Pentax also has exposure compensation and exposure bracketing. (I consider this difference significant.)The Pentax uses SD flash memory cards, while the Fuji uses xD Cards. SD Cards are cheaper, faster, available in higher capacities,and more widely available than xD Cards. (All by itself, that would decide it for me.)

So, the Pentax has ashorter, slightly dimmer lens, and it costs more, but it has shake reduction, exposure compensation, exposure bracketing, it uses SD Cards, and you can add other lenses later.

When you buy the Fuji, you're done. When you buy the Pentax, you're just getting started.

Good luck with your decision.


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Old Sep 16, 2007, 7:21 PM   #5
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Let's compare apples to apples, jmd...in order to have the same zoom range as the S6000 with the K100D, you'll need to purchase the 50-200mm lens. You can add it to your shopping cart at Beach for and additional $238 (also with a $50 mail-in rebate). Bottom line, you'll have to shell out a total of $638. Of course you'll be getting $100 back in the mail - eventually. Of course, you'll still have to buy an SD card...but don't worry, they're cheap and widely available. Or, you can buy the S6000 at Amazon for $309.99. And, there's a $50 Fuji mail-in rebate in effect until 10/31. Naturally, you will have to buy an xD card, but don't worry, unless you live on the moon (or perhaps Maryland) there are plenty of them around.

You stated in an earlier post that you were interested in nature and sports photography. If that is still true, then I'm afraid your K100D kit lens would be essentially useless. Even for portraiture it comes up a little short. Since Pentax doesn't offer an 18-200mm lens, you're essentially forced to purchase two lenses to cover the equivalent 28-300mm range.

Just thought you should know.

the Hun


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Old Sep 16, 2007, 9:51 PM   #6
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There isn't a right or wrong answer to this question. For me the answer was to get the K100 - I originally bought an FZ30 and couldn't get the quality of pictures I wanted with it. The K100 does - and that ended up being my bottom line (which actually surprised me). The kit lens is not bad at all - I don't have as much vignetting at its widest as some others do. I still use it for anything wider than 50mm. It does a reasonably good job with street photography, landscapes and close ups (it's not a macro but can do flowers quite well). It's an excellent value, considering it doesn't cost much. If you know that you aren't going to be using telephoto right away, I'd say go for it. You can add the 50-200, or something else later on, when you've become familiar with the camera and your shooting style. After all - there's always Christmas for adding lenses, perhaps birthdays etc. If you don't mind manual lenses, there's always the used lens market (though top quality lenses have gotten expensive) - any lens made for a Pentax camera will work on the K100.
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Old Sep 17, 2007, 5:22 PM   #7
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I certainly agree with mtngal-

When one compares the two cameras (Fuji S-6000 and the Pentax K-100D) the Pentax K-100D clearly has the best longterm capability outcome potential. I have nothing against the S-6000, I own one.

However, as I understand the original post, the K-100D best meets the present needs of the original poster, and offers extensive future capabilities, more so than a fixed lens non IS equipped camera.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 17, 2007, 7:45 PM   #8
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Thanks to everyone for your detailed and thoughtful responses. I was looking for a camera to do sports photography a while back. In the meantime, I've been using a friend's Elph and my Sears KSX manual film camera t shoot photos, favoring the Elph because it's digital and I don't have to spend cash to process film. Unfortunately, I never shot any sports photos because I was usually on the court playing and seldom on the sidelines. However, I did find myself shooting landscapes, "still life and objects", and some street shots. One of my major concerns is image quality and I wanted to get folks' opinions about that (as if I haven't read tons of opinions already--some quite heated). Right now, I'm leaning toward the Pentax. I'll make prints of some of the images I've found in these forums (fora?) and let my eyes make the decision. :-)

Thanks!
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Old Sep 17, 2007, 8:45 PM   #9
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Well, I quickly scoured the web and found these two photos for you. Both are done with the Pentax 18-55mm kit lens. The first is a landscape take with a K-10 not a K-100D. The second is a bird macro taken with a K-100D and the Pentax K-100D. Yes, we try harder for you!

Sarah Joyce

The Landscape:



The Macro:




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Old Sep 20, 2007, 7:57 AM   #10
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In your last post, jmd, you mention sports photography as a possible interest. I own both the s6000fd and the Pentax K10d. The s6000 is a wonderful camera, and I got some terrific shots with it last soccer season, however, it simply can't compare with the overal quality of a DSLR. Last Friday night, I had the opportunity to have both cameras on the sideline in a HS football game to do a side-by-side comparison. I can't afford a really dedicated long f2.8 sports lens, so my K10 shots were done with a MF f2.8 135mm Takumar lens that I bought off ebay for 20 bucks. The results of the comparison are posted in the Sports and Action forum,

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=82

I could not be happier with my s6000. With static photos, it's hard to beat, particularly in low light situations. The places where the DSLR begins to pull away are any time the subject is in motion, and in flexibility.
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