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Old Nov 5, 2007, 8:01 AM   #11
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Oh, and while I think of it, wouldnt a prime for a 4/3 camera be closer to 37mm instead of 50mm? I know that on most DSLRs 50mm is equivelant to a film focal length of 75mm, but on the Oly 50mm is 100mm right? So, 37mm or so would be closer to the same length as a 50mm prime. Does that make sense?
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Old Nov 5, 2007, 8:01 AM   #12
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Unfortunately, the choice of lenses is limited to Olympus and Sigma, plus a few very good but very expensive lensesfrom Panasonic/Leica.

The two lenses that can come with the E-510 are the 14-42mm f3.5-5.6 and the 40-150mm F4.0-5.6 (Which B&H has for $799.95). A 50mm prime would be good on the other dSLRs discussed elsewhere in this topic, but because of the smaller image sensor in the Olympus, 50mm might be too long. For fast lenses, B&H has the Sigma 24mm f/1.8 for $339, and the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 for $429, as well as the Olympus 50mm f/2.0 for $425.
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Old Nov 5, 2007, 12:12 PM   #13
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SNAP!

Yes. A 50mm lens on a Nikon D40 (1.5x Crop Factor) has an angle of view equivalent to that of a 75mm lens on a 35mm film SLR, and on a Canon XT (1.6x Crop Factor) has an angle of view equivalent to that of a 80mm lens.

So an Olympus E-510 would need a 37.5-40mm lens to have an equivalent angle of view. The trouble is, nobody makes one. Olympus makes a 35mm, but it's f/3.5, and point is to have something about f/2.0 or better. I mentioned the Olympus 50mm f/2.0, and there's the Olympus 35-100mm f/2.0, but that's about $2,200. The Sigma 18-50mm f/2.8 might work, and it's about $420. I've got the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 that works well in low light. I used it to take this one of my granddaughter:


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Old Nov 10, 2007, 1:39 PM   #14
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Well I got down to see all of my choices and I have to say I really like the them all. Can't say as I felt like there was that much difference in the handling.All of them did seem to be heavier than I was expecting.For some reason I keep getting drawn to the Canon, looked at the XTI, not sure I could use the small screen of the XT and be happy,and it did seem lighter to me. One question i had for the sales guy was it had said in one of the reviews that on the Pentax you lose the auto ISO if you use the EV? How important is that? Seems like it would be odd to have that happen and is there a work around? The Canon doesn't have the solid feel of the Pentax. I was surprised just how heavy they seem. Makes one appreciate the E510 a lot more. The Canon did seem a little quicker in focusing. Really wish they would include a better lens to start with. I guess I keep getting swayed by so many of the reviews very favorable reviews of the Canon and it being their camera of choice. The Pentax does not allow RAW+JPEG caputre. Do any of you use that and would you miss it? For Pentax users do you find you need to adjust your images or are they fine right out of the camera? I guess I can only afford either camera with the kit lens right now and for awhile. I am torn. I do see that the Pentax is getting harder to find in stock.They must be selling like hot cakes! Any other advice from Pentax users? Thanks for all the great help.
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Old Nov 10, 2007, 1:53 PM   #15
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TCav wrote:
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SNAP!

Yes. A 50mm lens on a Nikon D40 (1.5x Crop Factor) has an angle of view equivalent to that of a 75mm lens on a 35mm film SLR, and on a Canon XT (1.6x Crop Factor) has an angle of view equivalent to that of a 80mm lens.

So an Olympus E-510 would need a 37.5-40mm lens to have an equivalent angle of view. The trouble is, nobody makes one. Olympus makes a 35mm, but it's f/3.5, and point is to have something about f/2.0 or better.
Why would your need that exact focal length for indoors in low light in most home environments (unless you have some special requirements). I'd probably just get a Sigma 30mm f/1.4 if I were going with the Oly. Close Enough (and probably more useful in closer quarters anyway, giving you the same angle of view on an Oly that you'd have using a 60mm lens on a 35mm camera). B&H stocks it.

Sigma 30mm f/1.4 in 4/3 mount for $429 at B&H


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Old Nov 10, 2007, 7:06 PM   #16
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JimC wrote:
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Why would your need that exact focal length for indoors in low light in most home environments (unless you have some special requirements). I'd probably just get a Sigma 30mm f/1.4 if I were going with the Oly. Close Enough (and probably more useful in closer quarters anyway, giving you the same angle of view on an Oly that you'd have using a 60mm lens on a 35mm camera). B&H stocks it.

Sigma 30mm f/1.4 in 4/3 mount for $429 at B&H
You wouldn't. The OP brought up the 50mm primes, and they would be appropriate, as much for the large apertures as the focal length. I mentioned 30mm as an option for the Olympus. For newborns and toddlers, though, the 30mm might not be long enough.
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Old Nov 10, 2007, 7:22 PM   #17
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Perhaps not if you wanted to fill the frame more. I tend to use a 28mm more than a 50mm indoors at home though. From my perspective, the wider lens is better when I want to get more in the frame (i.e., more than one person type of shots), and I just move closer to the subject if I want to fill the frame more.

You can move closer, but you can only back up so far. ;-) I used my 28mm f/2 exclusively at a family reunion weekend before last, even though it was in a wide open banquet hall. lol It's a pretty good lens for that kind of thing.

I guess each user is going to have a lens they prefer for any given subject type/shooting condition.


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Old Nov 10, 2007, 10:12 PM   #18
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Before I got the Pentax dSLR I briefly had a camera that took jpg + raw, and used it at first. However, I found that I was always tweaking the pictures (I had done that with the Sony F717 all the time, too - I enjoy it) so quickly decided that it wasn't worth the extra storage space/memory. I now have the K10 which is capable of raw + jpg and have used it exactly once. It's not something that I use at all, even though I now have the capability with one of my two cameras.

As far as the auto ISO not working when you use EV compensation - I just learned something. I was going to say that you must have been mis-informed about that, but I would have been wrong! I looked at the owners manual to be sure (frankly I had never noticed this) and sure enough, the K100 won't adjust ISO automatically if you use the EV compensation. The K10 will (I even tried it before I started this message), but not the K100. Goes to show you how much of a difference it has made to me. I don't generally use EV compensation (though it's a very useful tool once in a while, and I'm grateful I have it available)- I tend to use spot metering, choosing what I want to expose properly and locking the exposure when the conditions require it. That's probably a personal quirk of mine, rather than a generally acceptable practice, though.

I'm probably not the best person to ask about pictures straight out of the camera. I often tweak the pictures, but as I said before, I've been doing that from the time I got my first digital camera. On the other hand, I've been doing post processing things for long enough that you can make a good picture somewhat better, but you can't make a bad picture into a good one. Also, what I find pleasing might not please you. I personally love the quality of the shots I get out of mytwo Pentax cameras, but that's my personal preference. Others prefer the pictures out of the Canon, so I don't think there's an "absolute" right answer.
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Old Nov 11, 2007, 10:59 AM   #19
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JimC wrote:
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Perhaps not if you wanted to fill the frame more. I tend to use a 28mm more than a 50mm indoors at home though. From my perspective, the wider lens is better when I want to get more in the frame (i.e., more than one person type of shots), and I just move closer to the subject if I want to fill the frame more.

You can move closer, but you can only back up so far. ;-) I used my 28mm f/2 exclusively at a family reunion weekend before last, even though it was in a wide open banquet hall. lol It's a pretty good lens for that kind of thing.

I guess each user is going to have a lens they prefer for any given subject type/shooting condition.
I agree, but when shooting infants/toddlers, a longer lens will get you a full body portrait yet you can keep your distance so as to not distract the subject.I think that will often result in a better environmental portrait.

I generally use my Tamron 17-500 f/2.8 at family ocassions, and I find that, for adults, I use the wider end of the range, but for children, I use the longer end of the range. I like (most of) my family and quickly tire of taking photos, so I usually pass my camera off to my step-son, and he seems to do the same thing.
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Old Nov 11, 2007, 11:14 AM   #20
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I've got a funny story (at least to me) about the downside of a longer fixed focal length lens).

My wife went to a family reunion not long ago and asked if I had a camera she could borrow.

She normally uses a Nikon 35mm body, but I broke the film door latch a while back changing film too fast.

Rather than letting her borrow a different film camera, I suggested that she try my old Nikon Coolpix 950.

I put in a large CompactFlash Card (1GB, which is very large for the small file sizes this old camera produces), along with a freshly charged set of batteries. I suggested she just use the Green Auto Position (i.e., use it as a point and shoot) since I didn't have time to explain all of the controls to her (and she's used to separate dials for shutter speed and aperture on the old Nikon 35mm body). This old camera takes great photos that way (very nice metering accuracy using green auto, especially with flash), and I figured she'd get more keepers with it versus trying to show her how to use a different camera.

When she got back home from the reunion, I transferrred all of the photos she took to my PC and noticed that many were framed a bit "tight" (to put it mildly). When I asked about the photos, she complained that this camera would not let her back up enough to get what she wanted in the frame, hence group shots didn't work at all.

Well, I forgot one small detail when I gave a *very* quick lesson on using the camera (it was literally just a couple of minutes while she was walking out the door). She had never used any type of digital camera before and didn't realize that the camera has a zoom lens (and I didn't show her the zoom controls on it and she's accustomed to twisting the zoom ring on a 35mm lens).

By default, at powerup, this old Nikon digital camera goes to the longest focal length zoom setting. So, all of the images were taken at a 35mm equivalent focal length of 115mm. :-)

I don't mind a fixed focal length lens. But, I'll admit that 115mm would be a bit long for many conditions (and her photos made for good evidence of that).

Yes, 115mm is a little longer than we're discusssing. But, I do tend to lean towards a wider lens for most close quarters indoor use for family snapshots when given a choice (because you can only back up so far). lol

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