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Old Nov 22, 2007, 1:08 PM   #1
fg
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This is a cross-forum camera/lens purchase query, I guess, but here will do. I've been unhappy with my xti/tamron 28-300 combination because of the lack of image stabilization. I'm a one-lens camera-always-with-me, even sometimes when running, spur of the moment shooter who likes to play with Camera Raw and Photoshop. Currently I carry a Gorrilapod but it's a hassle. Too many chances escape me. The moment of truth came when I missed a dozen hawks sailing oddly together across Taboose Creek canyon in the Sierra.

So I'd been considering dumping thexti for the new 12 mp Sony and adding a Sony/Minolta same zoom tamron again, in a couple of months once the Sony come down in price. But now I see Tamron will be out with a stabilized 28-300. My question is how will Tamron's rolling-ball stabilization compare with Sony's in-camera?

I imagine Sony's is electronic??? In-camera sounds superior to me on a hunch, but I'm no engineer. Are there alternatives I'm overlooking?

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Old Nov 22, 2007, 1:56 PM   #2
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I am currently using the Sony A-100 and K-M 5D with the new Tamron 18-250mm lens as a single lens solution, and have been very pleased with the stabilization and the image quality produced. I would imagine that it would be even better with the 12mp A-700. Here is a sample photo.

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Old Nov 22, 2007, 6:05 PM   #3
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Here is the same photo taken with the KM 5D and using the Sigma 18-125mm lens. You will see that the results are indeed quite consistent.

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Old Nov 22, 2007, 9:32 PM   #4
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The new 12MP Sony is heavy, so I'm not sure you would want to be carrying it around with you all the time, especially when running.

The Sensor Shift image stabilization in both the 10MP Sony α100 andthe new 12MP α700 is very good, and would solve your problem. And there's no need to add a lens containing optical image stabilization to it; the combination will overcompensate for camera shake and produce a blurred image anyway.

The Tamron 28-300 is an ok lens, but you might be better off with Sony's 18-250 that mtclimber recommended. Optically, it's the same as the Tamron 18-250 that has been receiving rave reviews, plus it appears to be geared to focus faster on the Sony dSLRs than the Tamron version.
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Old Nov 23, 2007, 6:45 AM   #5
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The IS system in the KM and the Sony DSLR cameras is mounted around the imager, and from personal experience I have found it to be quite effective. I would agree with TCav that adding a IS equipped lens would probably not be effective as the two systems would be working against each other.

I can recall when that Tamron 28-300mm lens (non IS version) sold for $139.

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Old Nov 23, 2007, 11:27 AM   #6
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TCav wrote:
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The new 12MP Sony is heavy, so I'm not sure you would want to be carrying it around with you all the time, especially when running.
It's not from my perspective.

I think it "feels" lighter than my Maxxum 5D with equivalent lenses on them, probably because it's weight is spread out more with a larger grip surface, better balance with more lenses, etc. The weight of the A100 or KM Maxxum 5D is concentrated in a smaller area.

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Old Nov 23, 2007, 11:32 AM   #7
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JimC wrote:
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TCav wrote:
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The new 12MP Sony is heavy, so I'm not sure you would want to be carrying it around with you all the time, especially when running.
It's not from my perspective.

I think it "feels" lighter than my Maxxum 5D with equivalent lenses on them, probably because it's weight is spread out more with a larger grip surface, better balance with more lenses, etc. The weight of the A100 or KM Maxxum 5D is concentrated in a smaller area.
I was think more about carrying it than handling it.
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Old Nov 23, 2007, 11:52 AM   #8
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There's not a huge difference from my perspective once you include the weight of things like the lens and battery with these cameras, and the A700 is the lightest camera in it's market niche (compared to models like the Canon EOS-40D, Nikon D300, Pentax K10D and new Olympus E-3)

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Old Nov 23, 2007, 1:58 PM   #9
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But speaking to the cheaper altrnative, keeping the xti and replacing my unstabilized Tamron with the new stabilized 28-300--How effective is Tamron's rolling-ball stabilization likely to be? Would it be less effective than Sony's in-camera?

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Old Nov 23, 2007, 2:34 PM   #10
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The stabilization system built into the Sony A700 is outstanding. Sony claims 2.5 to 4 stops with it (improved over previous Sony and Konica Minolta DSLR models).

I think it's perfectly capable of delivering that, and more. I've been *very* impressed with it. The new shutter and mirror mechanism dampening in this model is also nice, and seems to eliminate the much of blur you'd usually see from mirror bounce vibration at very slow shutter speeds.

Take this indoor snapshot without a flash as an example.

Sony DSLR-A700 at ISO 800, wearing a Konica Minolta 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 DT Autofocus Lens at 55mm and f/5.6. Hand held at 1/5 second.



I would heed the others and forget the Tamron 28-300mm AF lens. It's really not a very good lens from most perspectives (higher Chromatic Aberrations/Purple Fringing compared to some of the newer designs, softer at it's longest zoom settings, etc.).

Buy a newer lens design like the Tamron or Sony 18-250mm f/3.5-5.6 if you want to go with an Ultra Zoom type lens. It's also got some of the same faults. But, it's a much better lens if you want a walk around lens with a wide focal range from wide to long.

In addition. it's starting focal length of 18mm makes it more usable in more conditions (sometimes, you won't be able to back up enough to get what you want in the frame using a lens that starts out at 28mm like the Tamron 28-300mm).

You're also getting 12MP to work with in a model like the Sony A700, so you've got a little more room for cropping.

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