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Old Nov 27, 2007, 6:07 AM   #1
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:?Has anyone out there got experience with the E510 +18-180 mm zoom lens.As I am thinking of buying either this combination or the nikon D40x+18-200 V R lens.What I am asking is ,is the inbuilt stabilisation on the Oly good enough at the long end of the tele or is it not up to the job?. I am sure the Nikon V R system would be fine but I like the features on the Oly better ie Dust /live etc.I have been down the several lenses route but I want a more portable and lighter set up,hence the all in one zooms.Canon is not really an option as the 17-85mm has not got enough reach for me and their long version is mega expensive.I would appreciate any input .

At the moment I am using a bridge camera with long zoom and stabilisation,which I have got used to as it allows me to get somegood hand held long shots and low light shots (I got it for portability)but I miss the overall quality of an S L R .

Thanks guys


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Old Nov 27, 2007, 7:53 AM   #2
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First, the Olympus E-510 is a fine camera, as is the Nikon D40x. By all accounts, the sensor shift image stabilization in the E-510 is about on par with the optical image stabilization in Nikon's 18-200 VR lens (See http://www.popphoto.com/cameras/4615...the-shake.html ).

Second, let me say that I'm not a big fan of superzooms. I was burned by a Minolta 18-200 (a rebranded Tamron.) I was satisfied with it until I wanted something better for low light. I got a cheap 50mm f/1.7 used, and that's how I discovered how bad the superzoom was. I now have multiple lenses that, in combination, encompass the range of the 18-200 and more. It is the dimmest, softest lens, with more geometric distortion and chromatic aberration that I own. To be fair, there are better superzooms, but not by much.

Zoom lenses are compromises, and superzooms are supercompromises. Photodo has a review of the Olympus 18-180 that is not flattering (See photodo Review ).PhotoDo's review of the Nikon 18-200 is better, but the difference is not great (See photodo Review). One thing they have in common is that they are both dim lenses, so low light shots are out unless the subject is close enough to use a flash.

One of the significant advantages of a dSLR is the option to choose a lens that is best suited for the subject and the environment. Choosing one lens to do everything may be convenient, but if you miss the overall quality of a dSLR, a superzoom may not satisfy you.

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Old Nov 27, 2007, 10:00 AM   #3
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When using the Zuiko 18-180mm you will have an effective focal length of 36mm to 360mm. That entirely eliminates a very useful wide angle focal length of 28 to 35mm.

You would be much happier, I would estimate with the 14-42mm kit lens (28 to 84mm in 35mm terms) and the 40-150mm lens (80mm to 300mm in 35mm terms) and you would save some money as well.

However, the Nikon D-40X with the 18-55mm kit lens and the 55-200mmVR lens covers 27mm to 300mm (in 35mm terms) and it might be the better outfit for a lesser experienced photographer.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Nov 27, 2007, 10:04 AM   #4
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Thanks for that Tcav,I've been looking at the comparisons site you posted .It pretty well answers my questions.To me the Nikon 18-200Vr looks like its in a league of its own as no one else at 200mm got close to 4 stops gain.I appreciate what you say about prime lenses being the best ,however I am getting on in years now and cant cope with lugging a bag full of lenses around anymore (been there done that).So light and portable is my only option.

Thanks for you help

Regards,

deadshot
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Old Nov 27, 2007, 10:09 AM   #5
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Hi MTclimber,

You are right of course (see my reply to T Cav)

I would get over the lack of 28mm by doing panarama shots and stitching them,as I do at the moment on my F Z7.

Best wishes

deadshot


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Old Nov 27, 2007, 10:25 AM   #6
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deadshot-

If the weight of your kit is the issue, give some consideration to the E-410 with the 18-180mm lens. I use the E-410 and find it to be an excellent camera.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Nov 27, 2007, 10:34 AM   #7
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mtclimber wrote:
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deadshot-

If the weight of your kit is the issue, give some consideration to the E-410 with the 18-180mm lens. I use the E-410 and find it to be an excellent camera.

Sarah Joyce
I like the idea of the i.stab in the E510 as holding the camera still is important to me.

thanks for your interest
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Old Nov 27, 2007, 11:10 AM   #8
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I am a big proponent of IS, so I think the E-510 is a better choice than the E-410 (which has digital IS which is not as effective.)

And, who knows? The Olympus 18-180 may work out for you (at least as long as you never try another lens, like I did. :-))

Olympus does have the advantage of making the smallest, lightest dSLRs available, and for equivalent angles of view, the smallest, lightest lenses as well. So if you decide to get the E-510 + 18-180, you may be very happy with it.

But, perhaps the store will let you take some photos with the combination before you buy it, and maybe you could also take some photos with the 14-42mm and 40-150mm kit lenses mtclimber mentioned. They are dim lenses as well, but they are better, optically, than the 18-180.Maybe the difference in image quality will persuade you to go with the two kit lenses instead of the convenience of the single 18-180.

Either way, good luck, and come back and post something.
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Old Nov 28, 2007, 7:14 AM   #9
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Thanks all,

trouble is I am not computer savvy enough to know how to post pictures on this site.

deadshot
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Old Nov 29, 2007, 9:01 AM   #10
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TCav wrote:
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Zoom lenses are compromises, and superzooms are supercompromises.
TCav,

I like that! May I quote you?

A. C.


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