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Old Dec 1, 2007, 9:32 AM   #1
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Hi,

Currently my wife and I own a Canon digital elph. Probably about 3 years old having gone through 3 kids it is pretty beaten up but does a good job. Recently We had a problem with it and Canon fixed it and refurbed the entire camera for no charge. It is light and portable and very easy to use. Great to carry in my front pocket.

I do like taking photos and with 3 boys I never take enough. I really want to take more of them they are getting big so fast.

Anyway, I have had this thought in my head that I would like a DSLR. Not I am told they take much better photos. I am usually a point a and shoot guy and have no idea about any of the digital camera settings except some of the color filters.

So the first question is should I get a DSLR? Or possibly upgrade my 3 year old digital elph.

If I get a DSLR originally I was thinking of a canon rebel XT or XTI. Now I also see the D-40 and D-40x as well a s the EVOLT 500. From a birds eye view the olympus seems like the best deal because of the 2 lenses but not sure when I would switch the 2? and not sure if I would want to carry both lenses with me at all times.

I saw a circular in my local paper the other day and the pricing I found are very low. Canon Digital XT with Lens $479, Digital XTI with Lens $599, Nikon D40X $579, and the Olympus EVOLT 500 $499 with 2 lenses.

By the way the difference between the eos xt and xti is????

Sorry for all of the questions.. I guess in summary. Should I get a bug bulk DSLR instead of my nice small elph. If I do which one is best for my needs and the best value for the money.
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 9:44 AM   #2
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For a pocket camera, I'd keep what you have. What's the exact model? Chances are, it takes photos just as nice or better than newer ones in most conditions if it's around 3 years old and Canon just refurbished it at no charge.

As for a DSLR model, what do you like to take photos of? They can shoot at higher ISO speeds (which makes the sensor more sensitive to light so that you can use faster shutter speeds).

They also have a lot of lens choices available, depending on what you want to shoot (some lenses are brighter and better suited to photography in low light, some are wider, some are longer (more apparent magnification), etc.

I'd let members know what you shoot more of, and in what conditions. Low light sports without a flash is one thing, family snapshots with one is another. ;-) So, think about conditions you shoot in and get blurry photos, etc. and that may help make a better choice. If most photos are in better condtiions (outdoors in the daytime, or indoors with a flash), then there is not as much difference between systems. But, in more demanding conditions (sports, low light shots without a flash, etc.), the camera and lenses you decide on will be more important if you want better photos.


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Old Dec 1, 2007, 10:15 AM   #3
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The point and shoot I have is the Canon Power Shot 400.

In terms of what i take photos of.... Really general photography is there is such a thing. Mostly people. Could be anything from the kids blowing out their birthday cakes to them on the soccer field, or on the beach, or playing a game in the house.

One thign I do find useful which I would miss on A DSLR is the quick time movie mode.
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 10:37 AM   #4
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The other thign is if I do buy a digital SLR camera chances I I won't be buying an new lenses. So if that were the case does it make sense to just gt the EVOLT 500 because it comes with the 2 lenses?
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 12:04 PM   #5
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Most of the DSLR models have kit lenses available (one or two lens kits), or if you go with a body only, you can buy lenses separately.

That's not a real big deal. For example, with an entry level DSLR model, you may want a wider lens for general photography, and a longer focal length zoom for your hockey photos.

I'd look at the models in Steve's Best Cameras List for starters.

Make sure to read the review conclusion sections. That's where you'll see more information on how models within a given market niche compare (Autofocus Speed and relibility, cycle times between photos in single shot and continuous modes, how they compare at higher ISO speeds settings, with discussion on image qualith indoors and outdoors and more).


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Old Dec 1, 2007, 6:04 PM   #6
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Why is it that you want a dSLR? Is it because you are told they take better pictures (they can but it often takes more than just pointing the camera to something and pushing the shutter speed)? Or is there something specific that you find lacking with your current camera? There are advantages and disadvantages both ways.

Disadvantages of the dSLRs are - bulk, weight, having much more to think about, easier to make mistakes, much higher expense, and it doesn't end with the camera (I now have 5 lens I carry all the time, want another one and yesterday bought a flash). There's no one-answer-fits-all-situations with them. How interested are you in learning some of the basic photography principles (what changes in aperture does, mostly, something you don't have to worry about much with a p&s camera). I love it all and have great fun with photography but it's not for everyone.

As far as which one - I happen to love my Pentax K100 but will readily admit that any of the lower priced dSLR camerasare capable of takingawesome pictures. Some have specificfeatures that will be important to certain people, but not to others. If you are just doing a bit of everything, then go to a camera store and handle them all - they are different sizes, the controls are in slightly different locations and the viewfinders are different. You might find one is too small/too large/uncomfortable/confusing etc. Remember that the best camera in the world can't take good pictures if it is in your closet because you hate carrying it.
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 7:22 PM   #7
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You make a very valid point about what i am looking for. I will tell you I am definitly not the guy that will carry around 5 different lenses and a big carry bag.

My brother has a rebel XT and he says it takes amazing photos. He keeps it in auto all of the time. He also originally purchased the camera with like an 18 to 200 lense. He then upgraded to an 18-300 lense so he told me I can have his old one . He does not typicaly switch lenses.
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 11:37 PM   #8
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benalexe wrote:
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....I am definitly not the guy that will carry around 5 different lenses and a big carry bag.
I am like that, too! There is a half-way house to dSLR, and that's a 'superzoom hybrid'. Some of these are quite small & light (and even cheap), will take surprisingly good images, and have a huge zoom range to cover a lotthat your SLR lenses would. I have finally sold my OM-10 film SLR and all its lenses & adapters.

I have a Kodak Z712is that would fit in a big pocket, but I carry it & spare batteries & a tiny tripod in a small camera bag (see below). It has image stabilisation, and some useful features absent from many dSLRs, notably an electronic viewfinder with live preview, which gives a good idea of the image you'll get.

The dSLRvs hybrid issue is well discussed by my local camera shop at http://www.wrexham-cameras.com/WHATS...ST-KOD-CAN.htm.

As well as the Z712, I also regularly use my breast-pocketable little Casio EX-Z750, when I can't even be bothered with the Z712's bag, so I don't think you should give up on tiny ones. With such brilliant value around, you can afford both for the price of a dSLR.

Good luck in your camera-hunting!
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Old Dec 1, 2007, 11:53 PM   #9
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Alan-

While I agree wholeheartedly with you concerning reducing the weight of your kit. After years of trying to make do with bridge or ultrazoom cameras, I find myself once again enjoying small DSLR cameras such as the Olympus E-410 with the two lens combination or the E-410 and the Olympus 18-180mm lens.

Comparing the cameras (the Olympus E-410 and the Kodak Z-712) the size differential is really not that great and the image quality is decidedly better with the Olympus E-410. It sure is an idea to ponder when you want to reduce the size and the weight of your kit while obtaining the very best image quality.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 2, 2007, 11:43 AM   #10
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I found what I think is an incredible deal on a digital rebel xti for $599 with lense 18-55.

Is the 18-55 as good as the zoom on a small point and shott like the canon powershot?

My brother also told me he has a lense for his rebel xt which is 18-200. I can alwyas use that one instead. But I wonder is the zoom on the 18-55 good?
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